Lactose Intolerant... Except They Don't really Seem to Know Their Own Diet?

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Generic

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Ever have someone who is lactose intolerant but doesn't really know what foods they can and can't eat? Or those who claim that are lactose intolerant but aren't really... or are actually milk protein intolerant (after you buy them the damn lactose-free milk?)
I've had a few lately that don't seem to know the low lactose items from the high lactose items. For example, whipping cream, yogurt, cottage cheese, butter, cream cheese and cheddar cheese are all considered low lactose items, which most can tolerate, but not all.
Does this happen to everyone, or are they just booking at my place?
 

Alibi Ike

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We don't even get into those details. If someone says 'no lactose' or 'no gluten' that is exactly what they get. If everyone else has cheese, they don't. If everyone else has french toast, they don't. Unless a guest says, 'I'm lactose intolerant but hard cheese is ok,' they get nothing that started out coming from a cow.
I don't know or care what individual diets can or cannot comprise.
Tomorrow it is no pork, no mushrooms and no nuts. So, the coffee cake will be sans peanut topping. (I don't take chances with nut allergies.) Two omelets will not have mushrooms and the other person won't get sausage.
I think that leaves 13 regular breakfasts. Altho, this morning one person skipped altogether and just had cereal. Who knows what she'll want tomorrow.
 

Generic

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No milk, no lactose and low-lactose are all different. For example, no lactose means I can use lactose-free milk, but no milk means that I can't. Low lactose means I should be able to use the items on that list, including small amounts of butter. Hey, I can work with all of them, but they should know what is high and low in lactose, no?
 

Breakfast Diva

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When I get a lactos intolerant guest, I always ask if they can have butter and clarify if they can have a little hard cheese. A lot of times butter is fine and a little cheese is fine. It makes my life much easier if I can use those two items, so I ask.
 

Alibi Ike

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Nothing about what people do and do not know about their particular dietary restrictions amazes me anymore!
Guests who have no idea they are not supposed to eat grapefruit and take statins still boggles the mind. We don't even serve grapefruit anymore it got so bad.
 

Copperhead

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I handle these more like Ike... it is easier that way. If a lactose guest says 'but I like soy milk' then at least I know that I can use it if I wish - But I do not ask, I will just make something else.
I think some people are on a certain diet just to be 'special' - we have talked about that before.... eating cookies from the cookie jar when their reservation says they need gluten free.
 

toddburme

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I am lactose intolerant and even the "lactose free" milk can get me. My kids too. The hardest thing for the cook is that butter and milk show up faster and tend to hit harder. The indigestible lactose moves through the system faster in liquid form so I am more likely to have a reaction.
I cook with soy milk and a butter substitute as it is impossible to avoid every bit of lactose so I go with the “don’t over do it” versus avoid every bit of it. I have had it for 20 years so I just hit a drive through on the way to people’s dinner parties and then just poke my way through it. I get it. Cooking without butter, milk and cheese is a pain and there is no way to make it taste the same.
 

Alibi Ike

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I am lactose intolerant and even the "lactose free" milk can get me. My kids too. The hardest thing for the cook is that butter and milk show up faster and tend to hit harder. The indigestible lactose moves through the system faster in liquid form so I am more likely to have a reaction.
I cook with soy milk and a butter substitute as it is impossible to avoid every bit of lactose so I go with the “don’t over do it” versus avoid every bit of it. I have had it for 20 years so I just hit a drive through on the way to people’s dinner parties and then just poke my way through it. I get it. Cooking without butter, milk and cheese is a pain and there is no way to make it taste the same..
This is why I don't even ask. We had guests a few weeks ago who could not have milk or cheese but we could cook with butter. The kids knew the whole routine and explained it to me. In one ear and out the other as far as I was concerned. Just tell me and let me deal.
But, that's the problem. Everyone is different. The diabetics with different types of diabetes. One says don't bother, I'll eat anything and the next says they can't have anything that isn't protein.
Which is why I have gone to turning it back on the guest. Don't tell me, 'I have XYZ ailment,' and expect me to know what you can and cannot eat. Just tell me what is ok.
Today's guests are no naked eggs (we have planned the whole weekend around this one issue), no hazelnuts, no pork, no mushrooms (yeah, they're still here). Someone emailed that they wanted pancakes. Well, we had pancakes on Friday morning and those guests are still here. So, no pancakes for these new guests. I wish I had a short order cook and a bigger kitchen so everyone could have exactly what they want.
No, not really. I think the guests should try to expand their horizons beyond pop tarts.
 

JBloggs

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Back to my theory (that has been tested and is tried and true) - whenever I do a total special breakfast due to one guest that guest either no-shows or won't eat it or much anyway. I personally wonder if they think we are tricking them and are not really making this special diet for them. That is why I don't do all of that, no meat, no problem, no gluten no problem, beyond that let them eat what they can and leave everything else.
But again, we rarely have that issue here. It is usually certain guests from certain parts of the country. I mean old people = more diabetes. (Although, of course, they are the ones who adore the sweeter breakfasts and want them!)
Lactose free is pretty easy for me, scrambled eggs I use a tsp of water - no milk. Pancakes - if it is okay to be cooked dairy then I can use a mix.
 

Alibi Ike

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Back to my theory (that has been tested and is tried and true) - whenever I do a total special breakfast due to one guest that guest either no-shows or won't eat it or much anyway. I personally wonder if they think we are tricking them and are not really making this special diet for them. That is why I don't do all of that, no meat, no problem, no gluten no problem, beyond that let them eat what they can and leave everything else.
But again, we rarely have that issue here. It is usually certain guests from certain parts of the country. I mean old people = more diabetes. (Although, of course, they are the ones who adore the sweeter breakfasts and want them!)
Lactose free is pretty easy for me, scrambled eggs I use a tsp of water - no milk. Pancakes - if it is okay to be cooked dairy then I can use a mix..
We found a mix with no dairy and requires no dairy when you mix it up. Grocery store brand. We got it for those kids who couldn't have dairy. They were in heaven.
 

gillumhouse

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Back to my theory (that has been tested and is tried and true) - whenever I do a total special breakfast due to one guest that guest either no-shows or won't eat it or much anyway. I personally wonder if they think we are tricking them and are not really making this special diet for them. That is why I don't do all of that, no meat, no problem, no gluten no problem, beyond that let them eat what they can and leave everything else.
But again, we rarely have that issue here. It is usually certain guests from certain parts of the country. I mean old people = more diabetes. (Although, of course, they are the ones who adore the sweeter breakfasts and want them!)
Lactose free is pretty easy for me, scrambled eggs I use a tsp of water - no milk. Pancakes - if it is okay to be cooked dairy then I can use a mix..
We found a mix with no dairy and requires no dairy when you mix it up. Grocery store brand. We got it for those kids who couldn't have dairy. They were in heaven.
.
Alibi Ike said:
We found a mix with no dairy and requires no dairy when you mix it up. Grocery store brand. We got it for those kids who couldn't have dairy. They were in heaven.
When I want to do pancakes and they are no dairy. I just use water instead of milk. works nicely and no extra costs.
 

Generic

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I am lactose intolerant and even the "lactose free" milk can get me. My kids too. The hardest thing for the cook is that butter and milk show up faster and tend to hit harder. The indigestible lactose moves through the system faster in liquid form so I am more likely to have a reaction.
I cook with soy milk and a butter substitute as it is impossible to avoid every bit of lactose so I go with the “don’t over do it” versus avoid every bit of it. I have had it for 20 years so I just hit a drive through on the way to people’s dinner parties and then just poke my way through it. I get it. Cooking without butter, milk and cheese is a pain and there is no way to make it taste the same..
This is why I don't even ask. We had guests a few weeks ago who could not have milk or cheese but we could cook with butter. The kids knew the whole routine and explained it to me. In one ear and out the other as far as I was concerned. Just tell me and let me deal.
But, that's the problem. Everyone is different. The diabetics with different types of diabetes. One says don't bother, I'll eat anything and the next says they can't have anything that isn't protein.
Which is why I have gone to turning it back on the guest. Don't tell me, 'I have XYZ ailment,' and expect me to know what you can and cannot eat. Just tell me what is ok.
Today's guests are no naked eggs (we have planned the whole weekend around this one issue), no hazelnuts, no pork, no mushrooms (yeah, they're still here). Someone emailed that they wanted pancakes. Well, we had pancakes on Friday morning and those guests are still here. So, no pancakes for these new guests. I wish I had a short order cook and a bigger kitchen so everyone could have exactly what they want.
No, not really. I think the guests should try to expand their horizons beyond pop tarts.
.
Special orders aren't a problem... we have a $50 charge for that, though. You should see how many special orders disappear when they hear that.
 

toddburme

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I am lactose intolerant and even the "lactose free" milk can get me. My kids too. The hardest thing for the cook is that butter and milk show up faster and tend to hit harder. The indigestible lactose moves through the system faster in liquid form so I am more likely to have a reaction.
I cook with soy milk and a butter substitute as it is impossible to avoid every bit of lactose so I go with the “don’t over do it” versus avoid every bit of it. I have had it for 20 years so I just hit a drive through on the way to people’s dinner parties and then just poke my way through it. I get it. Cooking without butter, milk and cheese is a pain and there is no way to make it taste the same..
This is why I don't even ask. We had guests a few weeks ago who could not have milk or cheese but we could cook with butter. The kids knew the whole routine and explained it to me. In one ear and out the other as far as I was concerned. Just tell me and let me deal.
But, that's the problem. Everyone is different. The diabetics with different types of diabetes. One says don't bother, I'll eat anything and the next says they can't have anything that isn't protein.
Which is why I have gone to turning it back on the guest. Don't tell me, 'I have XYZ ailment,' and expect me to know what you can and cannot eat. Just tell me what is ok.
Today's guests are no naked eggs (we have planned the whole weekend around this one issue), no hazelnuts, no pork, no mushrooms (yeah, they're still here). Someone emailed that they wanted pancakes. Well, we had pancakes on Friday morning and those guests are still here. So, no pancakes for these new guests. I wish I had a short order cook and a bigger kitchen so everyone could have exactly what they want.
No, not really. I think the guests should try to expand their horizons beyond pop tarts.
.
Special orders aren't a problem... we have a $50 charge for that, though. You should see how many special orders disappear when they hear that.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
Special orders aren't a problem... we have a $50 charge for that, though. You should see how many special orders disappear when they hear that.
Nice idea!
 

Generic

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I am lactose intolerant and even the "lactose free" milk can get me. My kids too. The hardest thing for the cook is that butter and milk show up faster and tend to hit harder. The indigestible lactose moves through the system faster in liquid form so I am more likely to have a reaction.
I cook with soy milk and a butter substitute as it is impossible to avoid every bit of lactose so I go with the “don’t over do it” versus avoid every bit of it. I have had it for 20 years so I just hit a drive through on the way to people’s dinner parties and then just poke my way through it. I get it. Cooking without butter, milk and cheese is a pain and there is no way to make it taste the same..
This is why I don't even ask. We had guests a few weeks ago who could not have milk or cheese but we could cook with butter. The kids knew the whole routine and explained it to me. In one ear and out the other as far as I was concerned. Just tell me and let me deal.
But, that's the problem. Everyone is different. The diabetics with different types of diabetes. One says don't bother, I'll eat anything and the next says they can't have anything that isn't protein.
Which is why I have gone to turning it back on the guest. Don't tell me, 'I have XYZ ailment,' and expect me to know what you can and cannot eat. Just tell me what is ok.
Today's guests are no naked eggs (we have planned the whole weekend around this one issue), no hazelnuts, no pork, no mushrooms (yeah, they're still here). Someone emailed that they wanted pancakes. Well, we had pancakes on Friday morning and those guests are still here. So, no pancakes for these new guests. I wish I had a short order cook and a bigger kitchen so everyone could have exactly what they want.
No, not really. I think the guests should try to expand their horizons beyond pop tarts.
.
Special orders aren't a problem... we have a $50 charge for that, though. You should see how many special orders disappear when they hear that.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
Special orders aren't a problem... we have a $50 charge for that, though. You should see how many special orders disappear when they hear that.
Nice idea!
.
toddburme said:
Eric Arthur Blair said:
Special orders aren't a problem... we have a $50 charge for that, though. You should see how many special orders disappear when they hear that.
Nice idea!
People read about some of our special dishes, like my White Chocolate Orange French Toast and well, I may have guests that are here for two weeks and I've served it to them, already. So I would have to make two seperate breakfasts... so it's a $50 charge for the special breakfast request (not per person, but just to make a special breakfast.)
And I really do make two different breakfasts. That's not to say that I won't modify a breakfast here or there, but if it's really unplanned, it's $50, thank you!
 

EmptyNest

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I am lactose intolerant and even the "lactose free" milk can get me. My kids too. The hardest thing for the cook is that butter and milk show up faster and tend to hit harder. The indigestible lactose moves through the system faster in liquid form so I am more likely to have a reaction.
I cook with soy milk and a butter substitute as it is impossible to avoid every bit of lactose so I go with the “don’t over do it” versus avoid every bit of it. I have had it for 20 years so I just hit a drive through on the way to people’s dinner parties and then just poke my way through it. I get it. Cooking without butter, milk and cheese is a pain and there is no way to make it taste the same..
This is why I don't even ask. We had guests a few weeks ago who could not have milk or cheese but we could cook with butter. The kids knew the whole routine and explained it to me. In one ear and out the other as far as I was concerned. Just tell me and let me deal.
But, that's the problem. Everyone is different. The diabetics with different types of diabetes. One says don't bother, I'll eat anything and the next says they can't have anything that isn't protein.
Which is why I have gone to turning it back on the guest. Don't tell me, 'I have XYZ ailment,' and expect me to know what you can and cannot eat. Just tell me what is ok.
Today's guests are no naked eggs (we have planned the whole weekend around this one issue), no hazelnuts, no pork, no mushrooms (yeah, they're still here). Someone emailed that they wanted pancakes. Well, we had pancakes on Friday morning and those guests are still here. So, no pancakes for these new guests. I wish I had a short order cook and a bigger kitchen so everyone could have exactly what they want.
No, not really. I think the guests should try to expand their horizons beyond pop tarts.
.
Special orders aren't a problem... we have a $50 charge for that, though. You should see how many special orders disappear when they hear that.
.
I LOVE IT!
Aside from some real health dietary restrictions...this would be a good policy. Cooks Choics folks, take or leave it...or pay $50 for your special order. What a good idea!!!
 

Alibi Ike

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I am lactose intolerant and even the "lactose free" milk can get me. My kids too. The hardest thing for the cook is that butter and milk show up faster and tend to hit harder. The indigestible lactose moves through the system faster in liquid form so I am more likely to have a reaction.
I cook with soy milk and a butter substitute as it is impossible to avoid every bit of lactose so I go with the “don’t over do it” versus avoid every bit of it. I have had it for 20 years so I just hit a drive through on the way to people’s dinner parties and then just poke my way through it. I get it. Cooking without butter, milk and cheese is a pain and there is no way to make it taste the same..
This is why I don't even ask. We had guests a few weeks ago who could not have milk or cheese but we could cook with butter. The kids knew the whole routine and explained it to me. In one ear and out the other as far as I was concerned. Just tell me and let me deal.
But, that's the problem. Everyone is different. The diabetics with different types of diabetes. One says don't bother, I'll eat anything and the next says they can't have anything that isn't protein.
Which is why I have gone to turning it back on the guest. Don't tell me, 'I have XYZ ailment,' and expect me to know what you can and cannot eat. Just tell me what is ok.
Today's guests are no naked eggs (we have planned the whole weekend around this one issue), no hazelnuts, no pork, no mushrooms (yeah, they're still here). Someone emailed that they wanted pancakes. Well, we had pancakes on Friday morning and those guests are still here. So, no pancakes for these new guests. I wish I had a short order cook and a bigger kitchen so everyone could have exactly what they want.
No, not really. I think the guests should try to expand their horizons beyond pop tarts.
.
Special orders aren't a problem... we have a $50 charge for that, though. You should see how many special orders disappear when they hear that.
.
I LOVE IT!
Aside from some real health dietary restrictions...this would be a good policy. Cooks Choics folks, take or leave it...or pay $50 for your special order. What a good idea!!!
.
I always ask if guests want meat with their main course. Many do not but do not think to mention that when booking. Today I asked if a guest would like sausage with the pancakes. He said, 'What are my choices?' I wasn't sure what he meant about 'choices' so I said, 'With sausage or without, that's the choice.' Then I said, 'Or, some of my friends say, "Take it or leave it."' He laughed.
 

Samster

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Maybe they're just figuring out what they can tolerate in the milk/dairy realm, Eric.
I know that it took me awhile. I can't tolerate regular milk or creamer, but cheese and the rest of it seem to be OK. I just don't bother mentioning it to innkeepers because I don't expect to be served cereal & milk usually and I just use the creamer that's available and deal with it. I'll usually just have one cup of coffee (decaf).
 

Joey Camb

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Back to my theory (that has been tested and is tried and true) - whenever I do a total special breakfast due to one guest that guest either no-shows or won't eat it or much anyway. I personally wonder if they think we are tricking them and are not really making this special diet for them. That is why I don't do all of that, no meat, no problem, no gluten no problem, beyond that let them eat what they can and leave everything else.
But again, we rarely have that issue here. It is usually certain guests from certain parts of the country. I mean old people = more diabetes. (Although, of course, they are the ones who adore the sweeter breakfasts and want them!)
Lactose free is pretty easy for me, scrambled eggs I use a tsp of water - no milk. Pancakes - if it is okay to be cooked dairy then I can use a mix..
We have done scrambled eggs with goats milk and soya before and it has turned out really well - ie had the goats milk in for them to have tea and cereal asked for scrambled eggs so we gave it a whirl with the alternative milk.
 

Generic

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Incidentally, at the supermarket yesterday we found that they now have lactose-free 35% cream. First time I saw it. We don't have many lactose-free products in Canada, so it surprised me. It's from Agropur, a local co-op.
 

YellowSocks

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I've had a run of non-milk guests lately. Not just lactose, they can't do milk, hard cheese, butter, any of it. But... well, the one lady went to Melt in Cleveland and as it's a recently developed issue, she ate the cheese sandwich anyway... and puked all the way home. Hmmm... that must be why your boyfriend was very specific about what you couldn't eat, even though YOU love it, HE knows you'd better not.
Another guest, who has now been here several times, happened to first come the day that long time repeats had requested biscuits and gravy for breakfast. He didn't tell me about his issues, planned to pick around his breakfast, ate the fruit and couldn't eat much else. On his next visit, he was the only guest here, and he admitted that he can't eat any kind of milk product, but he hates to put me out. His breakfast of choice? A bit of fruit, hard boiled eggs and a slice of brown toast. I can do that...
I think part of the issue is that the people with the special diets really, really want to eat what they're not supposed to eat... and kind of hope you'll serve it to them! (At least some of them!)
=)
Kk.
 
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