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lactose intolerant guest

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Dee C.

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I was just informed by my guest that she is lactose intolerant. No mention of this prior to arrival. Any suggestions for breakfast?
 

muirford

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Omelets, no cheese. Oatmeal (use cider for 1/2 the water and grate an apple into it after cooking to make it different). Make a note to keep a supply of the shelf-stable rice, soy, oat or hemp milks that are available. They are pretty decent substitutes for regular milk in a pinch.
 

Dee C.

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Omelets, no cheese. Oatmeal (use cider for 1/2 the water and grate an apple into it after cooking to make it different). Make a note to keep a supply of the shelf-stable rice, soy, oat or hemp milks that are available. They are pretty decent substitutes for regular milk in a pinch..
Thanks. This is my first experience and I'll be better prepared next time!
 

Morticia

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Ditto scrambled eggs, just use the eggs with a little water.
Ditto having 'milk alternatives' on hand. I usually get sy milk because I'll drink that myself after the guest leaves never having touched the stuff!
 

JBloggs

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bacon and eggs, potatoes, fruit.
sausage, omelets of all varieties...
 

Sanctuary

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I have a couple that visits often. She is lactose intolerant. I keep Lactaid milk on hand for them when they are here.
 

JBloggs

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Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
 

Morticia

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Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
And back to keeping things simple...when faced with this guest, we ALL need to say, IMMEDIATELY, 'How does that impact breakfast? Do you need to have absolutely NO dairy products, limited dairy? What do you usually eat?'
I think that helps all of us when we put the ball in the guest's court to TELL us what they mean by, 'I can't eat...'
 

muirford

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Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
And back to keeping things simple...when faced with this guest, we ALL need to say, IMMEDIATELY, 'How does that impact breakfast? Do you need to have absolutely NO dairy products, limited dairy? What do you usually eat?'
I think that helps all of us when we put the ball in the guest's court to TELL us what they mean by, 'I can't eat...'
.
I do that with almost any allergies these days, especially nuts. "Is this a death allergy?" Big difference cooking for someone who gets hives or indigestion from eating nuts to someone who goes into anaphylactic shock.
 

Morticia

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Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
And back to keeping things simple...when faced with this guest, we ALL need to say, IMMEDIATELY, 'How does that impact breakfast? Do you need to have absolutely NO dairy products, limited dairy? What do you usually eat?'
I think that helps all of us when we put the ball in the guest's court to TELL us what they mean by, 'I can't eat...'
.
I do that with almost any allergies these days, especially nuts. "Is this a death allergy?" Big difference cooking for someone who gets hives or indigestion from eating nuts to someone who goes into anaphylactic shock.
.
muirford said:
I do that with almost any allergies these days, especially nuts. "Is this a death allergy?" Big difference cooking for someone who gets hives or indigestion from eating nuts to someone who goes into anaphylactic shock.
Seriously? 'Is this a death allergy?'

Gomez says, 'Well, we don't want to kill you...'
 

muirford

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Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
And back to keeping things simple...when faced with this guest, we ALL need to say, IMMEDIATELY, 'How does that impact breakfast? Do you need to have absolutely NO dairy products, limited dairy? What do you usually eat?'
I think that helps all of us when we put the ball in the guest's court to TELL us what they mean by, 'I can't eat...'
.
I do that with almost any allergies these days, especially nuts. "Is this a death allergy?" Big difference cooking for someone who gets hives or indigestion from eating nuts to someone who goes into anaphylactic shock.
.
muirford said:
I do that with almost any allergies these days, especially nuts. "Is this a death allergy?" Big difference cooking for someone who gets hives or indigestion from eating nuts to someone who goes into anaphylactic shock.
Seriously? 'Is this a death allergy?'

Gomez says, 'Well, we don't want to kill you...'
.
I don't say it all that seriously, but I do ask the question. 'Is this the kind of allergy where if something has touched a nut it will kill you..."; something along those lines. I get people who tell me they have that kind of chemical sensitivity to a specific item, like insecticide. If we sprayed for bugs or mice, this guest could not stay here. I went to college with a guy who couldn't eat an oatmeal cookie if it had shared a box from home with a peanut butter cookie. He found that out when he did it once. So far no one has been that bad off but you better believe I want to know about it if it's going to happen.
 

gillumhouse

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I know I am late. Been entertaining a friend all day and enjoying every minute!
Make pancakes using water instead of milk if it is a mulitple day stay.
 

JBloggs

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Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
And back to keeping things simple...when faced with this guest, we ALL need to say, IMMEDIATELY, 'How does that impact breakfast? Do you need to have absolutely NO dairy products, limited dairy? What do you usually eat?'
I think that helps all of us when we put the ball in the guest's court to TELL us what they mean by, 'I can't eat...'
.
I do that with almost any allergies these days, especially nuts. "Is this a death allergy?" Big difference cooking for someone who gets hives or indigestion from eating nuts to someone who goes into anaphylactic shock.
.
muirford said:
I do that with almost any allergies these days, especially nuts. "Is this a death allergy?" Big difference cooking for someone who gets hives or indigestion from eating nuts to someone who goes into anaphylactic shock.
I have a guest here right now who said she is allergic to pecans. She put that on the rez and mentioned again at check in. Then she said...:I have an epi pen if you accidentally have some in something"
WHAT!
I thought that was the oddest thing ever, I mean I saw her allergy and mentioned it to her and she was actually being jovial as she said that. No worries, no sneaking pecans into anything for you.
Dh USED TO SAY "Don't worry the hospital is only two blocks from here, you could even walk to it in time" when people would mention "sensitivities" which is a word that S\B used in place of the word ALLERGY in most instances.
Lactose intolerant - means you cannot digest it at all right, or do they have a sensitivity so they belch or they get a queazy stomach? I guess it would fall under "too much information" but life or death - ER vs burping...could be useful info since we are some how now quasi-dietitions. :)
 

Morticia

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Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
Question for those who are lactose intolerant - perhaps you don't actually want a substitute milk product, maybe you just avoid it? Just thinking aloud as people suggest soy/rice/lactaid/lactose free milk etc.
And another thing about lactose intolerance - some people it is not a HUGE deal just gives them gas, so you might be going to a ton of trouble for something - well let's face it some already deal with anyway. LOL! I am jus' sayin'... it might not be a "DIRE" case, just prefers not to have heavy doses of lactose.
And back to keeping things simple...when faced with this guest, we ALL need to say, IMMEDIATELY, 'How does that impact breakfast? Do you need to have absolutely NO dairy products, limited dairy? What do you usually eat?'
I think that helps all of us when we put the ball in the guest's court to TELL us what they mean by, 'I can't eat...'
.
I do that with almost any allergies these days, especially nuts. "Is this a death allergy?" Big difference cooking for someone who gets hives or indigestion from eating nuts to someone who goes into anaphylactic shock.
.
muirford said:
I do that with almost any allergies these days, especially nuts. "Is this a death allergy?" Big difference cooking for someone who gets hives or indigestion from eating nuts to someone who goes into anaphylactic shock.
Seriously? 'Is this a death allergy?'

Gomez says, 'Well, we don't want to kill you...'
.
I don't say it all that seriously, but I do ask the question. 'Is this the kind of allergy where if something has touched a nut it will kill you..."; something along those lines. I get people who tell me they have that kind of chemical sensitivity to a specific item, like insecticide. If we sprayed for bugs or mice, this guest could not stay here. I went to college with a guy who couldn't eat an oatmeal cookie if it had shared a box from home with a peanut butter cookie. He found that out when he did it once. So far no one has been that bad off but you better believe I want to know about it if it's going to happen.
.
I ask about 'contact' allergies because of that. Some guests who are gluten intolerant CAN eat something that has been in the toaster. Others HAVE to have completely separately cooked meals. So, they either go first or they wait until we are able to scrub the griddle for their meal. Different spatula, cannot use the same butter for the griddle as MAYBE the knife touched something with gluten, different pan for their meats, different tongs to pick everything up, etc.
THAT is an allergy that would kill me. I LOVE bread. Everything in my own kitchen has probably got bread crumbs on it! I would have to ban gluten from the house.
 

sgirouard

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A few thoughts here. Two of my three kids have a milk sensitivity (think non-death allergy), so I've been then in plenty of recipes. Theirs is protein based (whay & casein), not lactose.
In baking, I have seen transparent results (can't tell the difference) when using soy, rice or almond milks. Coconut milk is a good subsititute, but the result can be different (for me, it depends whether I use the canned stuff or the refrigerated section stuff). Not bad, just different.
As far as drinking - I would suggest soy as a good choice, but ask what/if they drink. My boys won't really be bothered with any seed ro nut milk as a beverage (unless it's doctored up like faux nog, but I suspect thats' teh sugar & spices talking, KWIM?)
Would it be possible to just keep some of those lactaid tablets on hand, just in case? I have no clue how those work - just a thought.
For coffee - definitely have a soy or something else creamer available. "Non-dairy" creamers virtually all contain caseine, a milk protein. If the lactose intolerant person says it's okay, there's that. Myself, I don't like to take chances with trace contamination.
And, as far as "non-death" allergies. My kids don't get anaphylactic from milk proteins. But one gets a horrible, gross, uncontrollable, very noticable physical response. While this isn't a "death" allergy, it's definitely NOT something I, as a guest, would be comfortable sharing with an innkeeper. Nor, as an innkeeper, is it a detail I would want.
Food allergies/sensitivities, in my experience, are an odd human phenomenon that can be difficult to relate to if you haven't had to live with them. While I don't have the experience most of you all do as innkeepers, I can imagine there are plenty of people with "allergies" who are just, <ahem>, difficult. I have to wonder - If it was all that critical - why didn't she tell you before she arrived?
 

muirford

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A few thoughts here. Two of my three kids have a milk sensitivity (think non-death allergy), so I've been then in plenty of recipes. Theirs is protein based (whay & casein), not lactose.
In baking, I have seen transparent results (can't tell the difference) when using soy, rice or almond milks. Coconut milk is a good subsititute, but the result can be different (for me, it depends whether I use the canned stuff or the refrigerated section stuff). Not bad, just different.
As far as drinking - I would suggest soy as a good choice, but ask what/if they drink. My boys won't really be bothered with any seed ro nut milk as a beverage (unless it's doctored up like faux nog, but I suspect thats' teh sugar & spices talking, KWIM?)
Would it be possible to just keep some of those lactaid tablets on hand, just in case? I have no clue how those work - just a thought.
For coffee - definitely have a soy or something else creamer available. "Non-dairy" creamers virtually all contain caseine, a milk protein. If the lactose intolerant person says it's okay, there's that. Myself, I don't like to take chances with trace contamination.
And, as far as "non-death" allergies. My kids don't get anaphylactic from milk proteins. But one gets a horrible, gross, uncontrollable, very noticable physical response. While this isn't a "death" allergy, it's definitely NOT something I, as a guest, would be comfortable sharing with an innkeeper. Nor, as an innkeeper, is it a detail I would want.
Food allergies/sensitivities, in my experience, are an odd human phenomenon that can be difficult to relate to if you haven't had to live with them. While I don't have the experience most of you all do as innkeepers, I can imagine there are plenty of people with "allergies" who are just, <ahem>, difficult. I have to wonder - If it was all that critical - why didn't she tell you before she arrived?.
sgirouard said:
And, as far as "non-death" allergies. My kids don't get anaphylactic from milk proteins. But one gets a horrible, gross, uncontrollable, very noticable physical response. While this isn't a "death" allergy, it's definitely NOT something I, as a guest, would be comfortable sharing with an innkeeper. Nor, as an innkeeper, is it a detail I would want.
I don't ask for the details of the reactions and would not be that interested in hearing them. Also, I would not be that interested in dealing with the results of those reactions being caused in my inn. So I would expect that if someone had that kind of violent physical reaction to say, a whisk that has been used to make whipped cream now being used to scramble the eggs for their (dairy-free) omelet, they would tell me that when I ask if it's a 'death allergy' or not. Not the reaction, the cause. I don't ever put any dairy in breakfast items if people say they can't have it. Period.
 

JBloggs

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Then there is ye ol' common sense - don't eat it. I mean if someone presented me with something I was allergic to I wouldn't eat it. I think plenty of people don't eat stuff because they don't like anyway, so no big deal.
My husband has an issue with proteins in milk. He still drinks it, just not tons of it.
See the way the author of the thread Dee C mentioned they just were told about lactose intolerant, makes me think it is not a huge issue for the guest.
I am not going to stock specialty foods like that - in fact LET THAT BY MY 2010 pledge/mantra, guess how they can take their coffee? BLACK! Half of our guests drink their coffee black - anyway. Not trying to come on strong, just laughing at the lengths innkeepers will go to and the guest probably just prefers not to have "too much dairy" and said that in a term others would understand. If they need a whitener in their coffee - let them bring their own.
 

JBloggs

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A few thoughts here. Two of my three kids have a milk sensitivity (think non-death allergy), so I've been then in plenty of recipes. Theirs is protein based (whay & casein), not lactose.
In baking, I have seen transparent results (can't tell the difference) when using soy, rice or almond milks. Coconut milk is a good subsititute, but the result can be different (for me, it depends whether I use the canned stuff or the refrigerated section stuff). Not bad, just different.
As far as drinking - I would suggest soy as a good choice, but ask what/if they drink. My boys won't really be bothered with any seed ro nut milk as a beverage (unless it's doctored up like faux nog, but I suspect thats' teh sugar & spices talking, KWIM?)
Would it be possible to just keep some of those lactaid tablets on hand, just in case? I have no clue how those work - just a thought.
For coffee - definitely have a soy or something else creamer available. "Non-dairy" creamers virtually all contain caseine, a milk protein. If the lactose intolerant person says it's okay, there's that. Myself, I don't like to take chances with trace contamination.
And, as far as "non-death" allergies. My kids don't get anaphylactic from milk proteins. But one gets a horrible, gross, uncontrollable, very noticable physical response. While this isn't a "death" allergy, it's definitely NOT something I, as a guest, would be comfortable sharing with an innkeeper. Nor, as an innkeeper, is it a detail I would want.
Food allergies/sensitivities, in my experience, are an odd human phenomenon that can be difficult to relate to if you haven't had to live with them. While I don't have the experience most of you all do as innkeepers, I can imagine there are plenty of people with "allergies" who are just, <ahem>, difficult. I have to wonder - If it was all that critical - why didn't she tell you before she arrived?.
sgirouard said:
And, as far as "non-death" allergies. My kids don't get anaphylactic from milk proteins. But one gets a horrible, gross, uncontrollable, very noticable physical response. While this isn't a "death" allergy, it's definitely NOT something I, as a guest, would be comfortable sharing with an innkeeper. Nor, as an innkeeper, is it a detail I would want.
I don't ask for the details of the reactions and would not be that interested in hearing them. Also, I would not be that interested in dealing with the results of those reactions being caused in my inn. So I would expect that if someone had that kind of violent physical reaction to say, a whisk that has been used to make whipped cream now being used to scramble the eggs for their (dairy-free) omelet, they would tell me that when I ask if it's a 'death allergy' or not. Not the reaction, the cause. I don't ever put any dairy in breakfast items if people say they can't have it. Period.
.
muirford said:
I don't ask for the details of the reactions and would not be that interested in hearing them.
You said it and how! ha ha
 

Don Draper

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Then there is ye ol' common sense - don't eat it. I mean if someone presented me with something I was allergic to I wouldn't eat it. I think plenty of people don't eat stuff because they don't like anyway, so no big deal.
My husband has an issue with proteins in milk. He still drinks it, just not tons of it.
See the way the author of the thread Dee C mentioned they just were told about lactose intolerant, makes me think it is not a huge issue for the guest.
I am not going to stock specialty foods like that - in fact LET THAT BY MY 2010 pledge/mantra, guess how they can take their coffee? BLACK! Half of our guests drink their coffee black - anyway. Not trying to come on strong, just laughing at the lengths innkeepers will go to and the guest probably just prefers not to have "too much dairy" and said that in a term others would understand. If they need a whitener in their coffee - let them bring their own.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
See the way the author of the thread Dee C mentioned they just were told about lactose intolerant, makes me think it is not a huge issue for the guest.
I am not going to stock specialty foods like that - in fact LET THAT BY MY 2010 pledge/mantra, guess how they can take their coffee? BLACK! Half of our guests drink their coffee black - anyway. Not trying to come on strong, just laughing at the lengths innkeepers will go to and the guest probably just prefers not to have "too much dairy" and said that in a term others would understand. If they need a whitener in their coffee - let them bring their own.
This is my response, if they are just telling you about it they can deal with whatever you have to feed them...if it were here they'd be getting scrambled eggs with bacon or sausage, toast with preserves, and fruit.
Now we do have a frequent guest who stays multiple times per year and is lactose intolerant and I've discussed with her preferences...she doesn't want any kind of milk substitute and is happy with the breakfast I described above. She doesn't normally eat breakfast at all so she enjoys the eggs especially.
 

Dee C.

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Then there is ye ol' common sense - don't eat it. I mean if someone presented me with something I was allergic to I wouldn't eat it. I think plenty of people don't eat stuff because they don't like anyway, so no big deal.
My husband has an issue with proteins in milk. He still drinks it, just not tons of it.
See the way the author of the thread Dee C mentioned they just were told about lactose intolerant, makes me think it is not a huge issue for the guest.
I am not going to stock specialty foods like that - in fact LET THAT BY MY 2010 pledge/mantra, guess how they can take their coffee? BLACK! Half of our guests drink their coffee black - anyway. Not trying to come on strong, just laughing at the lengths innkeepers will go to and the guest probably just prefers not to have "too much dairy" and said that in a term others would understand. If they need a whitener in their coffee - let them bring their own.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
See the way the author of the thread Dee C mentioned they just were told about lactose intolerant, makes me think it is not a huge issue for the guest.
I am not going to stock specialty foods like that - in fact LET THAT BY MY 2010 pledge/mantra, guess how they can take their coffee? BLACK! Half of our guests drink their coffee black - anyway. Not trying to come on strong, just laughing at the lengths innkeepers will go to and the guest probably just prefers not to have "too much dairy" and said that in a term others would understand. If they need a whitener in their coffee - let them bring their own.
This is my response, if they are just telling you about it they can deal with whatever you have to feed them...if it were here they'd be getting scrambled eggs with bacon or sausage, toast with preserves, and fruit.
Now we do have a frequent guest who stays multiple times per year and is lactose intolerant and I've discussed with her preferences...she doesn't want any kind of milk substitute and is happy with the breakfast I described above. She doesn't normally eat breakfast at all so she enjoys the eggs especially.
.
I appreciate all the feedback, everyone. What an incredible pleasure it is for a new innkeeper to know I can ask a question, and seconds later have a variety of answers to help me. My guest was delighted with her fruit cup, scrambled eggs ( made with water) and Italian toast with preserves, and black coffee. Thanks, guys!
 
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