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Colleen848

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I have just received approval for the first B&B in the town where I live.
I believe it's a great site as I am located on a golfcourse have another across the road.
I'm looking to redo the flooring and am torn between new carpeting, laminate flooring or attempting to
restore the original plank flooring.
The house itself is 250+ years, with many updates of course. The sleeping quarters and common areas will be upstairs above me.
Any suggestions or insight would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Colleen848
 

EmptyNest

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Welcome! Congratulations. Is it your current home or were you a lucky one able to get financing for a B& B?
Personally I would go for hardwoods and use area rugs. Easier to take care of and you don't have to worry about cleaning stains and spills from carpeting.
 

gillumhouse

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Congrats!!
Are the originall floors unusable? Could you just sand and seal them?
We (ahem, DH) sanded the floors with a hand sander so he would not have swirls on the floor from the sander. Then we used a water-base ploy that in made in New Berlin, Wisconsin,. Expensive, but worth it. He did 4 or 5 coats on the dining room floor in 1995 - high traffic room - and it is still nice, The thing about the water-based poly is that it does NOT darken the wood as the oil-based does. It let the beauty of the wood show. He did this in all the guest rooms also. Have area rugs in all the rooms with the beautiful showing all around.
Oersonally, if I had a house that was 250+, I would not have carpet - out of place, out of period.
 

Madeleine

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Here's a test...stand downstairs and have some friends walk around upstairs. Have them talk on their phones and maybe turn on a radio or two.
How much sound are you getting downstairs and in the hallways and room to room?
If you can insulate between the floors and walls, keep as much original woodwork as you can. If you can't insulate and it sounds like a herd of buffalo with just a couple of friends doing a test, then you need carpeting to deaden the sound. Maybe a really nice, large area rug with some good padding underneath would give you the best of both.
Good luck with your big project!
 

Weaver

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Living in a 100+ year old farm house, I have refinished the original wood floors in 7 of the 9 rooms. The dining room was too far gone, and the kitchen although had "wood" it was not suitable for finishing, it got tile.
I used the water based poly as well and it is awesome. Teenagers, and a big stupid dog haven't even left a scratch. I agree carpet (ours was pepto pink in the living room) is very out of character. Not only is wood historically correct it is much easier to keep clean.
The best thing about wood floors is you can clean them silently, no vacuum buzzing about. A good dust mop or damp mop (ala Swiffer) and the dust bunnies are toast!
Large area rugs can easily be aired out for deep spring cleaning or shampooing. Wood is always the way to go.
 

Generic

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I don't like carpet flooring at all. To me it just never feels clean. Smal rugs on a wood or laminate floor are preferable. Laminite is easy and you can put good insulation below it. The original wood is also great. Be aware that laminate shouldn't go near water, but if damaged is relatively easy to replace.
 

Joey Camb

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My neighbour has just done real wood laminate (oak i think) and it looks amazing however did point to her as it is in the hall which runs past her bedroom that she might think about a rug as otherwise the clop clop of shoes will keep her awake. My other neighbour has wood laminate in her breakfast room and swears by it and says would never have carpet in there again. However I would buy a more expensive real wood type as it will be more in keeping with your property and lasts longer. I really fancy having my breakfast room done like that but will have to win the lottery!
 

Colleen848

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Here's a test...stand downstairs and have some friends walk around upstairs. Have them talk on their phones and maybe turn on a radio or two.
How much sound are you getting downstairs and in the hallways and room to room?
If you can insulate between the floors and walls, keep as much original woodwork as you can. If you can't insulate and it sounds like a herd of buffalo with just a couple of friends doing a test, then you need carpeting to deaden the sound. Maybe a really nice, large area rug with some good padding underneath would give you the best of both.
Good luck with your big project!.
Thanks for your advice. Actually the area I will be using I had previouly rented out as a 2 bedroom apartment. So I am pretty much aware of the noise level.
With the exception of a teenage girl blasting music I didn't have much sound downstairs.
Other than that, the most noise comes from small children running through the rooms or those "elephant" feet people who stomp up the stairs.
Problem lies in the stairway going upstairs in that it lands on an L shaped hallway with one wall that is curved in an arc. Amazing what they did with horse hair plaster and lath.
I like the simplicity of laminate but a place I called said it was quite costly to put a "nose" on each step.
Guess I will just have to get quotes.
Thanks for your insight and quick reply.
 

Colleen848

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Congrats!!
Are the originall floors unusable? Could you just sand and seal them?
We (ahem, DH) sanded the floors with a hand sander so he would not have swirls on the floor from the sander. Then we used a water-base ploy that in made in New Berlin, Wisconsin,. Expensive, but worth it. He did 4 or 5 coats on the dining room floor in 1995 - high traffic room - and it is still nice, The thing about the water-based poly is that it does NOT darken the wood as the oil-based does. It let the beauty of the wood show. He did this in all the guest rooms also. Have area rugs in all the rooms with the beautiful showing all around.
Oersonally, if I had a house that was 250+, I would not have carpet - out of place, out of period..
I honestly can't remember what the plank flooring looks like since the wall to wall has been down so long. Believe me I got my monies worth.
One of the bedrooms I know I would not be able to restore because I cut through the floor to reinforce a box to install a downstairs ceiling fan.
I had an experience with my ex of sanding a floor before and would NEVER want to do that again.
Guess I'll have to pull the carpeting up and take a look see.
I agree that wood would be more in period with the house.
You reminded me that when an appraiser came through and saw the flooring in my quarters noticed that there were 3 different widths to the boards, excluding the planking. He could date it back to when it was installed by that.
 

Colleen848

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My neighbour has just done real wood laminate (oak i think) and it looks amazing however did point to her as it is in the hall which runs past her bedroom that she might think about a rug as otherwise the clop clop of shoes will keep her awake. My other neighbour has wood laminate in her breakfast room and swears by it and says would never have carpet in there again. However I would buy a more expensive real wood type as it will be more in keeping with your property and lasts longer. I really fancy having my breakfast room done like that but will have to win the lottery!.
I'm tending more towards the laminate with reservations about some of the problems I have addressed to others who commented.
The salesman told me that laminate wears better than real wood.
Anyone know if this is true or not?
 

Colleen848

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I don't like carpet flooring at all. To me it just never feels clean. Smal rugs on a wood or laminate floor are preferable. Laminite is easy and you can put good insulation below it. The original wood is also great. Be aware that laminate shouldn't go near water, but if damaged is relatively easy to replace..
I was told by a salesman today that they have laminate flooring that is guaranteed water resistant. Since there will be no running water in the rooms I am not that concerned.
Unfortunately I am not able to provide separate baths. They will share a huge bathroom with an original claw foot tub that I had re-glazed. You know the kind you could drown in. lol
After pondering what you said I feel you have an excellent point in that carpeting just doesn't feel as clean. It is subject to spills, stains and absorbs odors.
Thanks for the reply
 

Colleen848

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Welcome! Congratulations. Is it your current home or were you a lucky one able to get financing for a B& B?
Personally I would go for hardwoods and use area rugs. Easier to take care of and you don't have to worry about cleaning stains and spills from carpeting..
I am most definitely leaning towards laminate flooring with a visual, imagination block about how to handle the stairs and hallway as I mentioned in other comments.
No, I am not a lucky one that was able to purchase a property for this purpose.
Actually my children who are now all in their 20's are fourth generation here. So there is alot of history.
My grandfather originally purchased this home with the surrounding 150+ acres to farm. After he retired my father put in an airport and then later built the golfcourse I am surrounded by. They are all long deceased.
He had a sad tale that at the age of 70 my stepmother filed for divorce and he was forced to sell. He sectioned off this homestead which I have today.
Long story but that's how it goes.
 

Colleen848

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I appreciate all of your suggestions so much. I was totally amazed at how quickly everyone responded.
Thank you for your insight, suggestions and support.
I am sure I will need much more advice as I continue this adventure.
 

Weaver

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If you love the wood, and want to fix the room with the damage, try taking a piece of flooring to a local mill.
I had damage in what was the original indoor kitchen, now my den, and it was 100 y/o heart pine. The mill matched it perfectly right down to the size and grain. Worth the $.
My personal opinion is wood can be refinished, laminate can't.
You can find the antique square nails online. They are pricey now, more than the wood in my case, but I had tons at the time so saved my back side there. Had I only known, could have put all three kids through college on the nails I didn't save.
 

Colleen848

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If you love the wood, and want to fix the room with the damage, try taking a piece of flooring to a local mill.
I had damage in what was the original indoor kitchen, now my den, and it was 100 y/o heart pine. The mill matched it perfectly right down to the size and grain. Worth the $.
My personal opinion is wood can be refinished, laminate can't.
You can find the antique square nails online. They are pricey now, more than the wood in my case, but I had tons at the time so saved my back side there. Had I only known, could have put all three kids through college on the nails I didn't save..
Ha Ha. I used to have some of those kicking around too but never realized they were so valuable.
 

Weaver

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If you love the wood, and want to fix the room with the damage, try taking a piece of flooring to a local mill.
I had damage in what was the original indoor kitchen, now my den, and it was 100 y/o heart pine. The mill matched it perfectly right down to the size and grain. Worth the $.
My personal opinion is wood can be refinished, laminate can't.
You can find the antique square nails online. They are pricey now, more than the wood in my case, but I had tons at the time so saved my back side there. Had I only known, could have put all three kids through college on the nails I didn't save..
Ha Ha. I used to have some of those kicking around too but never realized they were so valuable.
.
Colleen848 said:
Ha Ha. I used to have some of those kicking around too but never realized they were so valuable.
$3 a nail now
 

muirford

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My neighbour has just done real wood laminate (oak i think) and it looks amazing however did point to her as it is in the hall which runs past her bedroom that she might think about a rug as otherwise the clop clop of shoes will keep her awake. My other neighbour has wood laminate in her breakfast room and swears by it and says would never have carpet in there again. However I would buy a more expensive real wood type as it will be more in keeping with your property and lasts longer. I really fancy having my breakfast room done like that but will have to win the lottery!.
I'm tending more towards the laminate with reservations about some of the problems I have addressed to others who commented.
The salesman told me that laminate wears better than real wood.
Anyone know if this is true or not?
.
Colleen848 said:
The salesman told me that laminate wears better than real wood.
Anyone know if this is true or not?
My real wood floors in a large part of the inn are from 1868. It wears just fine if you take care of it, and can be refinished. A professional can do the job with no left-behind rotary marks, although count on a lot of dust.
 

Madeleine

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My neighbour has just done real wood laminate (oak i think) and it looks amazing however did point to her as it is in the hall which runs past her bedroom that she might think about a rug as otherwise the clop clop of shoes will keep her awake. My other neighbour has wood laminate in her breakfast room and swears by it and says would never have carpet in there again. However I would buy a more expensive real wood type as it will be more in keeping with your property and lasts longer. I really fancy having my breakfast room done like that but will have to win the lottery!.
I'm tending more towards the laminate with reservations about some of the problems I have addressed to others who commented.
The salesman told me that laminate wears better than real wood.
Anyone know if this is true or not?
.
Colleen848 said:
I'm tending more towards the laminate with reservations about some of the problems I have addressed to others who commented.
The salesman told me that laminate wears better than real wood.
Anyone know if this is true or not?
Here's my experience...laminate doesn't show the wear the way that real wood does. Our dog beat our pine floors to death with her nails, running from her bed to the door. Couldn't see a thing with the laminate. Not a scratch or scuff. That said, we yanked the laminate out of the dining room and replaced it with real wood. Why? The laminate looks, feels and sounds like what it is- fake. Now I would bet good money that the laminate that was here was the cheapest thing on the market, so you might be able to find laminate that behaves better.
Laminate cannot be repaired the way real wood can. Think about your own house! The wood has been there for how many years??? And you can still walk on it, it still does the job. It might just need a little TLC. I think if I bought a house and found out there were real wood floors under laminate I would wonder about the sanity of the person who did that.

We have carpet in the bedrooms to deaden the sound. Keep sound transmission in mind whatever you do. If guests can hear each other, they will complain.
 

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