New Inn listings for sale - small and huge

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JBloggs

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I am amazed at those 2 bedroom inns for sale (which s/not be called B&B's they are homestays if they are that small), I don't get it, and then there are the 11 room $2.5 mil (which are INNS not B&Bs at that size with hired staff), if you pay that you require staff AND a very high occupancy, you could make more money putting your down payment in a CD to draw interest. Doesn't anyone want a very manageable 5 or 6 room B&B where they can live onsite and enjoy innkeeping, meeting their guests, interacting, cooking, restoration, marketing, etc. ?
Here is the BBonline listing for the latest for sale within 30 days http://www.bbonline.com/forsale/new.cfm
 

EmptyNest

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Oh no...this place is up for sale again. Owners haven't been there for maybe a couple years. We looked at this place wayyyyyy back when with the original owers had it for I think 750K :-(
 

wendydk

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A homestay means that you pay to stay in one of the kids bedrooms, share a living room and a breakfast table with a family. Why is a two room B&B a homestay rather than a B&B, especially if they offer everything a larger Inn might?
Just curious!
 

JBloggs

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Yes, most are sharing the living room and dining room with the family, I have not seen any 2 bedroom (myself) that aren't like this. If they are out there I apologize, typically this small of a B&B are letting out of spare rooms and lack dedicated guest spaces.
 

Morticia

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A homestay means that you pay to stay in one of the kids bedrooms, share a living room and a breakfast table with a family. Why is a two room B&B a homestay rather than a B&B, especially if they offer everything a larger Inn might?
Just curious!.
'Homestay' is pretty broad but I would include any place where I am sitting in the innkeepers' living room with or without them and eating breakfast in the morning with their kids or at least in their personal space. Not necessarily sleeping in their kid's room, as most have a dedicated room if they're serious. But it is much more 'family-like' than what most people expect.
Riki has 2 rooms but I wouldn't call her place a homestay because everyone has their own space. Innkeepers over here, guests over there.
Friends have 5 rooms and I WOULD call theirs a homestay because their kids are in the living room with you, you eat at their dining room table and their kids eat with you. There is no separation of family and guest. (Maybe that's more of the description...no separation.) But you don't sleep in the kids' rooms, they have the other side of the house for their bedrooms.
 

Copperhead

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Well I do not think of a 2 room B&B as a homestay either. We have several here in our area.
I looked up homestay in Wiki and the definition it gave reminds me of a description of what would be a small boarding type house.
 
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Well I do not think of a 2 room B&B as a homestay either. We have several here in our area.
I looked up homestay in Wiki and the definition it gave reminds me of a description of what would be a small boarding type house..
Two accommdations here but I am more like cottages. Breakfast is done room service (on a large tray,family style-not plated). I am listed in some directories as a Cottage & some as a B&B.The only common areas are the hot tub sun room and soon the events barn(arrives July 6 ).My space is private (no guest in my kitchen).Always enjoy the Innkeeper sites but 1/2 the ideas do not pertain to my cottage/B&B.Mary in Bwater.

 

egoodell

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We're two suites right now. We have not yet built our other wing, but have more common space than most, so I would not call my place a homestay. To me a homestay is staying at someone's house in the spare bedroom. We are far from that...
Also can depend on area regs. When we were trying to get setup in Napa, the town of Calistoga would only give a license at the time for a two room B&B. That's a hobby, not a business, so we left.
Riki
 

domsmom

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A homestay means that you pay to stay in one of the kids bedrooms, share a living room and a breakfast table with a family. Why is a two room B&B a homestay rather than a B&B, especially if they offer everything a larger Inn might?
Just curious!.
'Homestay' is pretty broad but I would include any place where I am sitting in the innkeepers' living room with or without them and eating breakfast in the morning with their kids or at least in their personal space. Not necessarily sleeping in their kid's room, as most have a dedicated room if they're serious. But it is much more 'family-like' than what most people expect.
Riki has 2 rooms but I wouldn't call her place a homestay because everyone has their own space. Innkeepers over here, guests over there.
Friends have 5 rooms and I WOULD call theirs a homestay because their kids are in the living room with you, you eat at their dining room table and their kids eat with you. There is no separation of family and guest. (Maybe that's more of the description...no separation.) But you don't sleep in the kids' rooms, they have the other side of the house for their bedrooms.
.
Sometimes my kids eat with the guests, usually if it is ok with the guests. It is extraordinarily difficult to market yourself as a homestay. I provide all the other amenities of a b&b and my children dining with the guests often adds to their wonderful experience. They may have a fantastic interaction or best yet is when grandma types are holding the little one and both thoroughly enjoying it. That is what this all about in my opinion. Sharing Life.
 

Morticia

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A homestay means that you pay to stay in one of the kids bedrooms, share a living room and a breakfast table with a family. Why is a two room B&B a homestay rather than a B&B, especially if they offer everything a larger Inn might?
Just curious!.
'Homestay' is pretty broad but I would include any place where I am sitting in the innkeepers' living room with or without them and eating breakfast in the morning with their kids or at least in their personal space. Not necessarily sleeping in their kid's room, as most have a dedicated room if they're serious. But it is much more 'family-like' than what most people expect.
Riki has 2 rooms but I wouldn't call her place a homestay because everyone has their own space. Innkeepers over here, guests over there.
Friends have 5 rooms and I WOULD call theirs a homestay because their kids are in the living room with you, you eat at their dining room table and their kids eat with you. There is no separation of family and guest. (Maybe that's more of the description...no separation.) But you don't sleep in the kids' rooms, they have the other side of the house for their bedrooms.
.
Sometimes my kids eat with the guests, usually if it is ok with the guests. It is extraordinarily difficult to market yourself as a homestay. I provide all the other amenities of a b&b and my children dining with the guests often adds to their wonderful experience. They may have a fantastic interaction or best yet is when grandma types are holding the little one and both thoroughly enjoying it. That is what this all about in my opinion. Sharing Life.
.
As long as ALL of your guests pre approve dining with your kids, that's fine. Me? I don't want kids at the breakfast table while I'm on vacation. Even kids of guests. I want adult conversation not a bunch of cooing and 'isn't she clever.'
So as not to insult anyone, I would tolerate the innkeeper's kids if everyone else wanted this, but that would be the last you'd see of me. (Which is probably just what you would want! Really, I get that I'm a grump about kids.)
If kids are a usual pat of the 'scenery' that should be noted somewhere on your website. 'Our kids look forward to meeting you, helping with your luggage and joining you at breakfast.'
 

Innkeeper To Go

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A homestay means that you pay to stay in one of the kids bedrooms, share a living room and a breakfast table with a family. Why is a two room B&B a homestay rather than a B&B, especially if they offer everything a larger Inn might?
Just curious!.
'Homestay' is pretty broad but I would include any place where I am sitting in the innkeepers' living room with or without them and eating breakfast in the morning with their kids or at least in their personal space. Not necessarily sleeping in their kid's room, as most have a dedicated room if they're serious. But it is much more 'family-like' than what most people expect.
Riki has 2 rooms but I wouldn't call her place a homestay because everyone has their own space. Innkeepers over here, guests over there.
Friends have 5 rooms and I WOULD call theirs a homestay because their kids are in the living room with you, you eat at their dining room table and their kids eat with you. There is no separation of family and guest. (Maybe that's more of the description...no separation.) But you don't sleep in the kids' rooms, they have the other side of the house for their bedrooms.
.
Sometimes my kids eat with the guests, usually if it is ok with the guests. It is extraordinarily difficult to market yourself as a homestay. I provide all the other amenities of a b&b and my children dining with the guests often adds to their wonderful experience. They may have a fantastic interaction or best yet is when grandma types are holding the little one and both thoroughly enjoying it. That is what this all about in my opinion. Sharing Life.
.
As long as ALL of your guests pre approve dining with your kids, that's fine. Me? I don't want kids at the breakfast table while I'm on vacation. Even kids of guests. I want adult conversation not a bunch of cooing and 'isn't she clever.'
So as not to insult anyone, I would tolerate the innkeeper's kids if everyone else wanted this, but that would be the last you'd see of me. (Which is probably just what you would want! Really, I get that I'm a grump about kids.)
If kids are a usual pat of the 'scenery' that should be noted somewhere on your website. 'Our kids look forward to meeting you, helping with your luggage and joining you at breakfast.'
.
Morticia said:
If kids are a usual pat of the 'scenery' that should be noted somewhere on your website. 'Our kids look forward to meeting you, helping with your luggage and joining you at breakfast.'
Ditto.
 

JBloggs

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Agree 100%, make sure it is known in advance, that kids will be present IN GUEST AREAS, period. Innkeepers from this forum have met our kids, but this is not something we do on a reg basis, our guests seldom even know they are here. We don't have toys in the yard and bikes piled up against the house. They are B&B kids, not average kids. This is part of their fate, so to speak, if we are innkeepers, then they are innkeepers as well. But they are not in the front line, they don't check in guests.
One kid who dined with us in Townsville Australia was drilled by the other guests, I felt sorry for this kid, the same questions we always get he got, and he was just trying to get off to school. "do you like this? I bet you get to meet interesting people?" etc etc Yeah "Sebastian", you have all heard of him before.
 

Joey Camb

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It is more of a feeling rather than a defined building like a kind of MOJO? Homestay is more about being part of a family for a short time and B&B is more of a professional service (that is how it is defined by the AA here) I think is is more about atmosphere.
 

Samster

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Agree 100%, make sure it is known in advance, that kids will be present IN GUEST AREAS, period. Innkeepers from this forum have met our kids, but this is not something we do on a reg basis, our guests seldom even know they are here. We don't have toys in the yard and bikes piled up against the house. They are B&B kids, not average kids. This is part of their fate, so to speak, if we are innkeepers, then they are innkeepers as well. But they are not in the front line, they don't check in guests.
One kid who dined with us in Townsville Australia was drilled by the other guests, I felt sorry for this kid, the same questions we always get he got, and he was just trying to get off to school. "do you like this? I bet you get to meet interesting people?" etc etc Yeah "Sebastian", you have all heard of him before..
Poor Sebastian....did he have his tuba at the breakfast table? :)
 

Samster

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A homestay means that you pay to stay in one of the kids bedrooms, share a living room and a breakfast table with a family. Why is a two room B&B a homestay rather than a B&B, especially if they offer everything a larger Inn might?
Just curious!.
'Homestay' is pretty broad but I would include any place where I am sitting in the innkeepers' living room with or without them and eating breakfast in the morning with their kids or at least in their personal space. Not necessarily sleeping in their kid's room, as most have a dedicated room if they're serious. But it is much more 'family-like' than what most people expect.
Riki has 2 rooms but I wouldn't call her place a homestay because everyone has their own space. Innkeepers over here, guests over there.
Friends have 5 rooms and I WOULD call theirs a homestay because their kids are in the living room with you, you eat at their dining room table and their kids eat with you. There is no separation of family and guest. (Maybe that's more of the description...no separation.) But you don't sleep in the kids' rooms, they have the other side of the house for their bedrooms.
.
Sometimes my kids eat with the guests, usually if it is ok with the guests. It is extraordinarily difficult to market yourself as a homestay. I provide all the other amenities of a b&b and my children dining with the guests often adds to their wonderful experience. They may have a fantastic interaction or best yet is when grandma types are holding the little one and both thoroughly enjoying it. That is what this all about in my opinion. Sharing Life.
.
As long as ALL of your guests pre approve dining with your kids, that's fine. Me? I don't want kids at the breakfast table while I'm on vacation. Even kids of guests. I want adult conversation not a bunch of cooing and 'isn't she clever.'
So as not to insult anyone, I would tolerate the innkeeper's kids if everyone else wanted this, but that would be the last you'd see of me. (Which is probably just what you would want! Really, I get that I'm a grump about kids.)
If kids are a usual pat of the 'scenery' that should be noted somewhere on your website. 'Our kids look forward to meeting you, helping with your luggage and joining you at breakfast.'
.
I am with you 100% on this. I love kids but if I want to eat breakfast with kids, I'll stay somewhere where I have to go endure them at Denny's or a similar place. Frankly, it's not the kids, it's parents and how they let them run amok.
We were just at a resort that we have gone to for many years. Parents are now bringing their children into the cocktail lounges!! What the??? My dh & I went to a very nice lounge in one of the most expensive hotels for a quiet anniversary celebratory cocktail and I was beaned with an ice cube by a tween messing around with their soda. The 2 sets of parents sitting at a separate table from the kids made no apology whatsoever.
Needless to say, I was NOT happy and it put a damper on our celebration. I don't think that's being a grump either.
 

Joey Camb

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My place looks a bit odd at the mo as I have just had the original railings put back up at the front but they come from the place coated in Iron oxside which is a rust colour and then we are painting them blue to match the canopy and other railings but it has rained solidly since the chap installed them so nothing matches oh dear.
 

Morticia

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Ha Ha, check out this NC Inn for sale. Too funny..
Maybe funny, but if I were the owner I wouldn't be laughing. Not the way I would want my inn portrayed...just to get someone to look at the listing
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catlady said:
Maybe funny, but if I were the owner I wouldn't be laughing. Not the way I would want my inn portrayed...just to get someone to look at the listing
And who posts their inn for sale with THIS selection of poor spelling (same place). The photo is coarse and so is the write up.
Of coarse our B&B is beautiful!
 

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