Pet Peeves

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Mtatoc

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Odd, I have found the bedskirts are too long and I am hemming all of them this month. I will say that I got a great bedskirt at JCP that actually has added matching fabric where it drapes over the boxspring so on that one bed I never see the muslin part of the bedskirt.
Peeve 5- One 50 gallon trash container's worth from one room on a one night stay.
Peeve 6- Please don't show up on the wrong day and blame me.
My peeves are pretty standard-
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning.
)
Don't show up 6 hours early and expect to check in..
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!

.
copperhead said:
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!
Note I said 'no reason'. Anything that comes up in the morning is unreasonable.

I really need to think that thru now. How to handle the morning breakfast issues they neglected to tell us about after all the opportunities to do so.
I guess what really gets me is the guest then expects us to make what they want. 'I can't have that, but I can have this...' something not at all on the agenda. There are days we really, seriously do NOT have whole wheat bread to make toast with. This is considered a crime of some sort by some guests.
'OK, then, I'll have a muffin. No muffins??!! How about some banana bread? Really? No banana bread??? What exactly are you running here if I can't get breakfast?'
The list of things I've been asked for when a guest doesn't want what's being served is amazing.
.
Okay, I guess the discussion should start with how you are doing breakfast that they feel that they can do this to you. I've had only one or two people try this, ever. So, something in the way that you set up breakfast is making them feel entitled to do this...
I'll explain how we have things set up and they maybe we can look at how you do it.
When a guest arrives for breakfast we have both a table of 6 set up and a counter for 2 set up. (We can push it to 8 and 3 if we have to.) On the table is the orange juice, milk, water. There is also usually a plate of something like muffins, danish, cheese or meat on the table as well. The first dish (ie yogurt, fruit, etc) is set up for them as well. In the centre of the table is jam, honey, nutella, etc along with spoons so that they don't cross contaminate. Sugar and cream are there as well. Coffee is in a carafe on the table and labelled. (I've never had anyone ask for other juices, either, but then we don't stock any other juices, really.)
On the far wall are two stations. Station 1 has cereal including oatmeal with bowls and packets for hot chocolate. Station 2 has a hot water dispenser, our coffee maker (coffee has been poured into the carafe to keep it hot, but the coffee maker is set up to make another pot in an emergency. And next to this is a pod brewer in case we need decaf or they want flavoured brown water. On the mantle is a selection of teast including green, decaf and black. On the counter next to the two spots are bagel and bread and the toaster. Then we usually announce saying "... and today we are making..." and that's that. We leave no room for orders, we don't ask. If they have an issue they will usually tell me that they don't want what I'm serving and at that point I simply say "enjoy the other items." or if I have time, offer a plain omelette or french toast.
If I have someone who is gluten free, I usually point out the items we have and tell them that if they want bread or toast to tell me, since we keep it frozen. If I have prepared for them, I have usually done it, first, so nothing cross contaminates and I can rewarm or reuse what is left for the rest of the guests.
If they tell me a food issue at the breakfast table, I'm attentive, but if impossible to accomodate I simply say that I'm sorry they didn't tell me ahead of time so we could prepaer something and offer the alternatives that are available. I don't take orders and I don't ask them what they want, ever! When you ask question you invite people to fill them in as they wish... and eggs benedict can be a possibility and it's too many steps! Can I make you a plain omelette instead?
As for bread, we usually only carry a whole wheat and not white, we carry bagels (sliced in half) and we can pull frozen bagels out of the freezer in an emergency. But they don't get a selection of bread either. It's what's next to the toaster. They make do.
.
We don't have anything out except the juice, coffee & tea. And the cereal, which is out all the time. If bread is part of the meal it's plated along with the entree. We have been telling the guests, 'This is what is for breakfast,' when they arrive. That way, the assumption was, if there was an issue they forgot to mention, now's the time.
We may stop that and announce breakfast in the morning, as has happened to us everywhere we have ever gone!
What makes guests think they can request anything is not my asking them what else can we get for them if they can't eat what we're serving. I don't know what it is. If someone suddenly discovers at 8 AM that they are gluten intolerant on a day we have FT then I will offer, if it is at all possible, scrambled eggs. But I ask the cook first if there are enough eggs for that. And if he feels like going out of his way.
We've had parents say to their kids, 'What would you like honey? Pancakes? Eggs? Waffles? FT?' I have to stop them right there and say, 'The breakfast is this...' A lot of times the parents will say, 'Then just a bagel for me.' WHERE did they see a bakery sign anywhere in my house?
Lots and lots of spouses will come to the kitchen after they see someone else being served and say, 'My spouse can't eat that.' Why the spouse didn't mention it when told what was coming is always a mystery.
Another one is someone saying they'll have bacon with the breakfast when sausage was given to them.
I had the patriarch of a family of 4, when a potato pie was set in front of them (after they were told what was coming) tell me, 'We do not eat potatoes for breakfast.' Period. Dad pushed the plate back at me. We were new at the time so we made that family a whole different breakfast. (Same family demanded we handle their lost luggage claim while they went out for the day and dented my car. They were just in the wrong place.)
My guess is that guests of all kinds were able to order breakfast to suit at other B&B's. Or the only other B&B's they've ever stayed at have a menu. (There are 2 of them in my town...just about anything you want is available every morning.)
We really do not keep frozen anything except breakfast meats.
The backup plan is scrambled eggs for gluten-intolerant guests and cereal and toast for egg intolerant guests. Everyone who wants it can have the breakfast meat with those choices.
The problem really lies in treating these complaining guests differently than other guests who are still sitting there eating something they may not have wanted either, but being 'good sports' about it. I don't want to delve into someone's medical problems in front of other people, but there are times I do. 'So sorry you are not able to eat bread, here are your scrambled eggs.' Or, 'My dad is allergic to eggs, too, I know how annoying it can be at breakfast to have to eat oatmeal when everyone else is having eggs.'
.
Maddie, I think for some reason that because your kitchen is actually visible to the guests, that it somehow makes them feel entitled to "order" breakfast. Do you think this is part of it? This is the only explanation that I can come up with because I think most of us have handled guests requesting something else than what is on the menu for the morning pretty much the same way that y'all have.
The only other thing that might be different is that you shop very often and don't keep much on hand, which might affect your flexibility?
I actually stopped posting the next morning's menu the evening before, because most guests said to me that they liked being surprised to see what was being served when they were seated. Our average LOS was 3 nights....did this have something to do with it? I don't know.
It's hard to tell...all B&Bs are different - location, types of guests, how we do breakfast, etc. Sorry that this continues to be an issue for you!
.
We're ok being flexible as long as people don't expect us to bend over and kiss their butts with off the cuff 'can't haves and won't eats'.

A lot of guests expect that we have a freezer full of items we will just thaw out. I pretend outrage that they think I would serve them a frozen waffle, a frozen quiche or a frozen muffin. It's freshly made or it's not on the menu. (Except the breakfast meat, that we do freeze when there's a big sale.)
I'm not sure if seeing the cook at work implies they can ask for whatever they want. Maybe it does. (Of course, if you email me a month in advance of your arrival and request something you love, that we already make, we will serve it.)
Oddly, I would think the opposite. We have an apt-sized fridge in the kitchen so I'm not understanding where they think all the ingredients are going to materialize from!
And it's really not an overwhelming problem. If it were we would really need to ask the guests why they thought it was a 'cook to order' breakfast. (Again, especially as we have told them all what was coming.)
.
Maddie, My kichen is in view as well but haven't had a problem. Only once someone saw I was making omelots and asked me to be sparse on the cheese. I state chef's choice and accomodate those who have told me in advance of thier preferences.
I have a small kichen, too, with a small refrig! We are just alike!
 

Madeleine

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Odd, I have found the bedskirts are too long and I am hemming all of them this month. I will say that I got a great bedskirt at JCP that actually has added matching fabric where it drapes over the boxspring so on that one bed I never see the muslin part of the bedskirt.
Peeve 5- One 50 gallon trash container's worth from one room on a one night stay.
Peeve 6- Please don't show up on the wrong day and blame me.
My peeves are pretty standard-
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning.
)
Don't show up 6 hours early and expect to check in..
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!

.
copperhead said:
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!
Note I said 'no reason'. Anything that comes up in the morning is unreasonable.

I really need to think that thru now. How to handle the morning breakfast issues they neglected to tell us about after all the opportunities to do so.
I guess what really gets me is the guest then expects us to make what they want. 'I can't have that, but I can have this...' something not at all on the agenda. There are days we really, seriously do NOT have whole wheat bread to make toast with. This is considered a crime of some sort by some guests.
'OK, then, I'll have a muffin. No muffins??!! How about some banana bread? Really? No banana bread??? What exactly are you running here if I can't get breakfast?'
The list of things I've been asked for when a guest doesn't want what's being served is amazing.
.
Okay, I guess the discussion should start with how you are doing breakfast that they feel that they can do this to you. I've had only one or two people try this, ever. So, something in the way that you set up breakfast is making them feel entitled to do this...
I'll explain how we have things set up and they maybe we can look at how you do it.
When a guest arrives for breakfast we have both a table of 6 set up and a counter for 2 set up. (We can push it to 8 and 3 if we have to.) On the table is the orange juice, milk, water. There is also usually a plate of something like muffins, danish, cheese or meat on the table as well. The first dish (ie yogurt, fruit, etc) is set up for them as well. In the centre of the table is jam, honey, nutella, etc along with spoons so that they don't cross contaminate. Sugar and cream are there as well. Coffee is in a carafe on the table and labelled. (I've never had anyone ask for other juices, either, but then we don't stock any other juices, really.)
On the far wall are two stations. Station 1 has cereal including oatmeal with bowls and packets for hot chocolate. Station 2 has a hot water dispenser, our coffee maker (coffee has been poured into the carafe to keep it hot, but the coffee maker is set up to make another pot in an emergency. And next to this is a pod brewer in case we need decaf or they want flavoured brown water. On the mantle is a selection of teast including green, decaf and black. On the counter next to the two spots are bagel and bread and the toaster. Then we usually announce saying "... and today we are making..." and that's that. We leave no room for orders, we don't ask. If they have an issue they will usually tell me that they don't want what I'm serving and at that point I simply say "enjoy the other items." or if I have time, offer a plain omelette or french toast.
If I have someone who is gluten free, I usually point out the items we have and tell them that if they want bread or toast to tell me, since we keep it frozen. If I have prepared for them, I have usually done it, first, so nothing cross contaminates and I can rewarm or reuse what is left for the rest of the guests.
If they tell me a food issue at the breakfast table, I'm attentive, but if impossible to accomodate I simply say that I'm sorry they didn't tell me ahead of time so we could prepaer something and offer the alternatives that are available. I don't take orders and I don't ask them what they want, ever! When you ask question you invite people to fill them in as they wish... and eggs benedict can be a possibility and it's too many steps! Can I make you a plain omelette instead?
As for bread, we usually only carry a whole wheat and not white, we carry bagels (sliced in half) and we can pull frozen bagels out of the freezer in an emergency. But they don't get a selection of bread either. It's what's next to the toaster. They make do.
.
We don't have anything out except the juice, coffee & tea. And the cereal, which is out all the time. If bread is part of the meal it's plated along with the entree. We have been telling the guests, 'This is what is for breakfast,' when they arrive. That way, the assumption was, if there was an issue they forgot to mention, now's the time.
We may stop that and announce breakfast in the morning, as has happened to us everywhere we have ever gone!
What makes guests think they can request anything is not my asking them what else can we get for them if they can't eat what we're serving. I don't know what it is. If someone suddenly discovers at 8 AM that they are gluten intolerant on a day we have FT then I will offer, if it is at all possible, scrambled eggs. But I ask the cook first if there are enough eggs for that. And if he feels like going out of his way.
We've had parents say to their kids, 'What would you like honey? Pancakes? Eggs? Waffles? FT?' I have to stop them right there and say, 'The breakfast is this...' A lot of times the parents will say, 'Then just a bagel for me.' WHERE did they see a bakery sign anywhere in my house?
Lots and lots of spouses will come to the kitchen after they see someone else being served and say, 'My spouse can't eat that.' Why the spouse didn't mention it when told what was coming is always a mystery.
Another one is someone saying they'll have bacon with the breakfast when sausage was given to them.
I had the patriarch of a family of 4, when a potato pie was set in front of them (after they were told what was coming) tell me, 'We do not eat potatoes for breakfast.' Period. Dad pushed the plate back at me. We were new at the time so we made that family a whole different breakfast. (Same family demanded we handle their lost luggage claim while they went out for the day and dented my car. They were just in the wrong place.)
My guess is that guests of all kinds were able to order breakfast to suit at other B&B's. Or the only other B&B's they've ever stayed at have a menu. (There are 2 of them in my town...just about anything you want is available every morning.)
We really do not keep frozen anything except breakfast meats.
The backup plan is scrambled eggs for gluten-intolerant guests and cereal and toast for egg intolerant guests. Everyone who wants it can have the breakfast meat with those choices.
The problem really lies in treating these complaining guests differently than other guests who are still sitting there eating something they may not have wanted either, but being 'good sports' about it. I don't want to delve into someone's medical problems in front of other people, but there are times I do. 'So sorry you are not able to eat bread, here are your scrambled eggs.' Or, 'My dad is allergic to eggs, too, I know how annoying it can be at breakfast to have to eat oatmeal when everyone else is having eggs.'
.
Maddie, I think for some reason that because your kitchen is actually visible to the guests, that it somehow makes them feel entitled to "order" breakfast. Do you think this is part of it? This is the only explanation that I can come up with because I think most of us have handled guests requesting something else than what is on the menu for the morning pretty much the same way that y'all have.
The only other thing that might be different is that you shop very often and don't keep much on hand, which might affect your flexibility?
I actually stopped posting the next morning's menu the evening before, because most guests said to me that they liked being surprised to see what was being served when they were seated. Our average LOS was 3 nights....did this have something to do with it? I don't know.
It's hard to tell...all B&Bs are different - location, types of guests, how we do breakfast, etc. Sorry that this continues to be an issue for you!
.
We're ok being flexible as long as people don't expect us to bend over and kiss their butts with off the cuff 'can't haves and won't eats'.

A lot of guests expect that we have a freezer full of items we will just thaw out. I pretend outrage that they think I would serve them a frozen waffle, a frozen quiche or a frozen muffin. It's freshly made or it's not on the menu. (Except the breakfast meat, that we do freeze when there's a big sale.)
I'm not sure if seeing the cook at work implies they can ask for whatever they want. Maybe it does. (Of course, if you email me a month in advance of your arrival and request something you love, that we already make, we will serve it.)
Oddly, I would think the opposite. We have an apt-sized fridge in the kitchen so I'm not understanding where they think all the ingredients are going to materialize from!
And it's really not an overwhelming problem. If it were we would really need to ask the guests why they thought it was a 'cook to order' breakfast. (Again, especially as we have told them all what was coming.)
.
Maddie, My kichen is in view as well but haven't had a problem. Only once someone saw I was making omelots and asked me to be sparse on the cheese. I state chef's choice and accomodate those who have told me in advance of thier preferences.
I have a small kichen, too, with a small refrig! We are just alike!
.
Mtatoc said:
Maddie, My kichen is in view as well but haven't had a problem. Only once someone saw I was making omelots and asked me to be sparse on the cheese. I state chef's choice and accomodate those who have told me in advance of thier preferences.
I have a small kichen, too, with a small refrig! We are just alike!
Are you sure it's not because your DH is standing there with his shotgun?

 

InnBloom

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1- people who are super reluctant to pay the night before/on arrival even if they are only staying 1 night.
2- went to trip a fuse box in room 2 which is located above the ensuite in a sort of false sealing operated by a trapdoor and only accessible by at the very least climbing on a chair. found some reject had put takeaway boxes in there and they were going mouldy! absolutely disgusting!!!.
2- went to trip a fuse box in room 2 which is located above the ensuite in a sort of false sealing operated by a trapdoor and only accessible by at the very least climbing on a chair. found some reject had put takeaway boxes in there and they were going mouldy! absolutely disgusting!!!
OMG. I have now officially heard everything. Nothing can surprise me after this one.

 

EmptyNest

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Odd, I have found the bedskirts are too long and I am hemming all of them this month. I will say that I got a great bedskirt at JCP that actually has added matching fabric where it drapes over the boxspring so on that one bed I never see the muslin part of the bedskirt.
Peeve 5- One 50 gallon trash container's worth from one room on a one night stay.
Peeve 6- Please don't show up on the wrong day and blame me.
My peeves are pretty standard-
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning.
)
Don't show up 6 hours early and expect to check in..
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!

.
copperhead said:
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!
Note I said 'no reason'. Anything that comes up in the morning is unreasonable.

I really need to think that thru now. How to handle the morning breakfast issues they neglected to tell us about after all the opportunities to do so.
I guess what really gets me is the guest then expects us to make what they want. 'I can't have that, but I can have this...' something not at all on the agenda. There are days we really, seriously do NOT have whole wheat bread to make toast with. This is considered a crime of some sort by some guests.
'OK, then, I'll have a muffin. No muffins??!! How about some banana bread? Really? No banana bread??? What exactly are you running here if I can't get breakfast?'
The list of things I've been asked for when a guest doesn't want what's being served is amazing.
.
Okay, I guess the discussion should start with how you are doing breakfast that they feel that they can do this to you. I've had only one or two people try this, ever. So, something in the way that you set up breakfast is making them feel entitled to do this...
I'll explain how we have things set up and they maybe we can look at how you do it.
When a guest arrives for breakfast we have both a table of 6 set up and a counter for 2 set up. (We can push it to 8 and 3 if we have to.) On the table is the orange juice, milk, water. There is also usually a plate of something like muffins, danish, cheese or meat on the table as well. The first dish (ie yogurt, fruit, etc) is set up for them as well. In the centre of the table is jam, honey, nutella, etc along with spoons so that they don't cross contaminate. Sugar and cream are there as well. Coffee is in a carafe on the table and labelled. (I've never had anyone ask for other juices, either, but then we don't stock any other juices, really.)
On the far wall are two stations. Station 1 has cereal including oatmeal with bowls and packets for hot chocolate. Station 2 has a hot water dispenser, our coffee maker (coffee has been poured into the carafe to keep it hot, but the coffee maker is set up to make another pot in an emergency. And next to this is a pod brewer in case we need decaf or they want flavoured brown water. On the mantle is a selection of teast including green, decaf and black. On the counter next to the two spots are bagel and bread and the toaster. Then we usually announce saying "... and today we are making..." and that's that. We leave no room for orders, we don't ask. If they have an issue they will usually tell me that they don't want what I'm serving and at that point I simply say "enjoy the other items." or if I have time, offer a plain omelette or french toast.
If I have someone who is gluten free, I usually point out the items we have and tell them that if they want bread or toast to tell me, since we keep it frozen. If I have prepared for them, I have usually done it, first, so nothing cross contaminates and I can rewarm or reuse what is left for the rest of the guests.
If they tell me a food issue at the breakfast table, I'm attentive, but if impossible to accomodate I simply say that I'm sorry they didn't tell me ahead of time so we could prepaer something and offer the alternatives that are available. I don't take orders and I don't ask them what they want, ever! When you ask question you invite people to fill them in as they wish... and eggs benedict can be a possibility and it's too many steps! Can I make you a plain omelette instead?
As for bread, we usually only carry a whole wheat and not white, we carry bagels (sliced in half) and we can pull frozen bagels out of the freezer in an emergency. But they don't get a selection of bread either. It's what's next to the toaster. They make do.
.
We don't have anything out except the juice, coffee & tea. And the cereal, which is out all the time. If bread is part of the meal it's plated along with the entree. We have been telling the guests, 'This is what is for breakfast,' when they arrive. That way, the assumption was, if there was an issue they forgot to mention, now's the time.
We may stop that and announce breakfast in the morning, as has happened to us everywhere we have ever gone!
What makes guests think they can request anything is not my asking them what else can we get for them if they can't eat what we're serving. I don't know what it is. If someone suddenly discovers at 8 AM that they are gluten intolerant on a day we have FT then I will offer, if it is at all possible, scrambled eggs. But I ask the cook first if there are enough eggs for that. And if he feels like going out of his way.
We've had parents say to their kids, 'What would you like honey? Pancakes? Eggs? Waffles? FT?' I have to stop them right there and say, 'The breakfast is this...' A lot of times the parents will say, 'Then just a bagel for me.' WHERE did they see a bakery sign anywhere in my house?
Lots and lots of spouses will come to the kitchen after they see someone else being served and say, 'My spouse can't eat that.' Why the spouse didn't mention it when told what was coming is always a mystery.
Another one is someone saying they'll have bacon with the breakfast when sausage was given to them.
I had the patriarch of a family of 4, when a potato pie was set in front of them (after they were told what was coming) tell me, 'We do not eat potatoes for breakfast.' Period. Dad pushed the plate back at me. We were new at the time so we made that family a whole different breakfast. (Same family demanded we handle their lost luggage claim while they went out for the day and dented my car. They were just in the wrong place.)
My guess is that guests of all kinds were able to order breakfast to suit at other B&B's. Or the only other B&B's they've ever stayed at have a menu. (There are 2 of them in my town...just about anything you want is available every morning.)
We really do not keep frozen anything except breakfast meats.
The backup plan is scrambled eggs for gluten-intolerant guests and cereal and toast for egg intolerant guests. Everyone who wants it can have the breakfast meat with those choices.
The problem really lies in treating these complaining guests differently than other guests who are still sitting there eating something they may not have wanted either, but being 'good sports' about it. I don't want to delve into someone's medical problems in front of other people, but there are times I do. 'So sorry you are not able to eat bread, here are your scrambled eggs.' Or, 'My dad is allergic to eggs, too, I know how annoying it can be at breakfast to have to eat oatmeal when everyone else is having eggs.'
.
Maddie, I think for some reason that because your kitchen is actually visible to the guests, that it somehow makes them feel entitled to "order" breakfast. Do you think this is part of it? This is the only explanation that I can come up with because I think most of us have handled guests requesting something else than what is on the menu for the morning pretty much the same way that y'all have.
The only other thing that might be different is that you shop very often and don't keep much on hand, which might affect your flexibility?
I actually stopped posting the next morning's menu the evening before, because most guests said to me that they liked being surprised to see what was being served when they were seated. Our average LOS was 3 nights....did this have something to do with it? I don't know.
It's hard to tell...all B&Bs are different - location, types of guests, how we do breakfast, etc. Sorry that this continues to be an issue for you!
.
We're ok being flexible as long as people don't expect us to bend over and kiss their butts with off the cuff 'can't haves and won't eats'.

A lot of guests expect that we have a freezer full of items we will just thaw out. I pretend outrage that they think I would serve them a frozen waffle, a frozen quiche or a frozen muffin. It's freshly made or it's not on the menu. (Except the breakfast meat, that we do freeze when there's a big sale.)
I'm not sure if seeing the cook at work implies they can ask for whatever they want. Maybe it does. (Of course, if you email me a month in advance of your arrival and request something you love, that we already make, we will serve it.)
Oddly, I would think the opposite. We have an apt-sized fridge in the kitchen so I'm not understanding where they think all the ingredients are going to materialize from!
And it's really not an overwhelming problem. If it were we would really need to ask the guests why they thought it was a 'cook to order' breakfast. (Again, especially as we have told them all what was coming.)
.
Sam may be on to something here! Think of all the short order restaurants, you see the cook in action!
And while they may only see an apt. size fridge, they think you have a stock room with a large freezer.
One additional thought is the breakfast page, could be with all the pictures they think you have a menu. With pictures saying 100 words, why read!

How about trying this: Instead of posting the next mornings meal, just have "Chef's Choice - join us for something yummy."
.
copperhead said:
One additional thought is the breakfast page, could be with all the pictures they think you have a menu. With pictures saying 100 words, why read!

How about trying this: Instead of posting the next mornings meal, just have "Chef's Choice - join us for something yummy."
That might just work. Except I know I am going to get, 'If he hasn't decided yet, then we want...' and if I say he has decided, 'Then what is it?' Maybe just 'Join us for breakfast- 8AM - 9:30 AM.'
And, yes, several guests have assumed every meal on the breakfast page was going to be available every day. It's kind of disconcerting to hear, 'So, when do I get the pancakes (omelet, FT, eggs and bacon)?' And then to be accused of pulling a fast one. 'I thought everything on the breakfast page was cooked every day. That's the only reason I stayed here.' Ouch.
.
Oh brother :-( How can they get that idea? If they read...ha ha...most don't...you clearly state Cooks Choice. Oh well.
 

Joey Camb

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1- people who are super reluctant to pay the night before/on arrival even if they are only staying 1 night.
2- went to trip a fuse box in room 2 which is located above the ensuite in a sort of false sealing operated by a trapdoor and only accessible by at the very least climbing on a chair. found some reject had put takeaway boxes in there and they were going mouldy! absolutely disgusting!!!.
2- went to trip a fuse box in room 2 which is located above the ensuite in a sort of false sealing operated by a trapdoor and only accessible by at the very least climbing on a chair. found some reject had put takeaway boxes in there and they were going mouldy! absolutely disgusting!!!
OMG. I have now officially heard everything. Nothing can surprise me after this one.

.
I could not BELIEVE IT!!"!!!! we are one of the few B&B's who allow food in rooms round here and I do it because my work men like it and so they stay with me long term ie have 4 chaps in till april which is nice steady money and they are imaculately tidy (ie clean cups and change the trash can bag and thats's it!) why on earth would you do it? mind you the BB person on here that had people who kept taking cutlery and crockery from the help youself area and hiding them all over would I am sure agree with me!
 

Copperhead

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Odd, I have found the bedskirts are too long and I am hemming all of them this month. I will say that I got a great bedskirt at JCP that actually has added matching fabric where it drapes over the boxspring so on that one bed I never see the muslin part of the bedskirt.
Peeve 5- One 50 gallon trash container's worth from one room on a one night stay.
Peeve 6- Please don't show up on the wrong day and blame me.
My peeves are pretty standard-
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning.
)
Don't show up 6 hours early and expect to check in..
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!

.
copperhead said:
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!
Note I said 'no reason'. Anything that comes up in the morning is unreasonable.

I really need to think that thru now. How to handle the morning breakfast issues they neglected to tell us about after all the opportunities to do so.
I guess what really gets me is the guest then expects us to make what they want. 'I can't have that, but I can have this...' something not at all on the agenda. There are days we really, seriously do NOT have whole wheat bread to make toast with. This is considered a crime of some sort by some guests.
'OK, then, I'll have a muffin. No muffins??!! How about some banana bread? Really? No banana bread??? What exactly are you running here if I can't get breakfast?'
The list of things I've been asked for when a guest doesn't want what's being served is amazing.
.
Okay, I guess the discussion should start with how you are doing breakfast that they feel that they can do this to you. I've had only one or two people try this, ever. So, something in the way that you set up breakfast is making them feel entitled to do this...
I'll explain how we have things set up and they maybe we can look at how you do it.
When a guest arrives for breakfast we have both a table of 6 set up and a counter for 2 set up. (We can push it to 8 and 3 if we have to.) On the table is the orange juice, milk, water. There is also usually a plate of something like muffins, danish, cheese or meat on the table as well. The first dish (ie yogurt, fruit, etc) is set up for them as well. In the centre of the table is jam, honey, nutella, etc along with spoons so that they don't cross contaminate. Sugar and cream are there as well. Coffee is in a carafe on the table and labelled. (I've never had anyone ask for other juices, either, but then we don't stock any other juices, really.)
On the far wall are two stations. Station 1 has cereal including oatmeal with bowls and packets for hot chocolate. Station 2 has a hot water dispenser, our coffee maker (coffee has been poured into the carafe to keep it hot, but the coffee maker is set up to make another pot in an emergency. And next to this is a pod brewer in case we need decaf or they want flavoured brown water. On the mantle is a selection of teast including green, decaf and black. On the counter next to the two spots are bagel and bread and the toaster. Then we usually announce saying "... and today we are making..." and that's that. We leave no room for orders, we don't ask. If they have an issue they will usually tell me that they don't want what I'm serving and at that point I simply say "enjoy the other items." or if I have time, offer a plain omelette or french toast.
If I have someone who is gluten free, I usually point out the items we have and tell them that if they want bread or toast to tell me, since we keep it frozen. If I have prepared for them, I have usually done it, first, so nothing cross contaminates and I can rewarm or reuse what is left for the rest of the guests.
If they tell me a food issue at the breakfast table, I'm attentive, but if impossible to accomodate I simply say that I'm sorry they didn't tell me ahead of time so we could prepaer something and offer the alternatives that are available. I don't take orders and I don't ask them what they want, ever! When you ask question you invite people to fill them in as they wish... and eggs benedict can be a possibility and it's too many steps! Can I make you a plain omelette instead?
As for bread, we usually only carry a whole wheat and not white, we carry bagels (sliced in half) and we can pull frozen bagels out of the freezer in an emergency. But they don't get a selection of bread either. It's what's next to the toaster. They make do.
.
We don't have anything out except the juice, coffee & tea. And the cereal, which is out all the time. If bread is part of the meal it's plated along with the entree. We have been telling the guests, 'This is what is for breakfast,' when they arrive. That way, the assumption was, if there was an issue they forgot to mention, now's the time.
We may stop that and announce breakfast in the morning, as has happened to us everywhere we have ever gone!
What makes guests think they can request anything is not my asking them what else can we get for them if they can't eat what we're serving. I don't know what it is. If someone suddenly discovers at 8 AM that they are gluten intolerant on a day we have FT then I will offer, if it is at all possible, scrambled eggs. But I ask the cook first if there are enough eggs for that. And if he feels like going out of his way.
We've had parents say to their kids, 'What would you like honey? Pancakes? Eggs? Waffles? FT?' I have to stop them right there and say, 'The breakfast is this...' A lot of times the parents will say, 'Then just a bagel for me.' WHERE did they see a bakery sign anywhere in my house?
Lots and lots of spouses will come to the kitchen after they see someone else being served and say, 'My spouse can't eat that.' Why the spouse didn't mention it when told what was coming is always a mystery.
Another one is someone saying they'll have bacon with the breakfast when sausage was given to them.
I had the patriarch of a family of 4, when a potato pie was set in front of them (after they were told what was coming) tell me, 'We do not eat potatoes for breakfast.' Period. Dad pushed the plate back at me. We were new at the time so we made that family a whole different breakfast. (Same family demanded we handle their lost luggage claim while they went out for the day and dented my car. They were just in the wrong place.)
My guess is that guests of all kinds were able to order breakfast to suit at other B&B's. Or the only other B&B's they've ever stayed at have a menu. (There are 2 of them in my town...just about anything you want is available every morning.)
We really do not keep frozen anything except breakfast meats.
The backup plan is scrambled eggs for gluten-intolerant guests and cereal and toast for egg intolerant guests. Everyone who wants it can have the breakfast meat with those choices.
The problem really lies in treating these complaining guests differently than other guests who are still sitting there eating something they may not have wanted either, but being 'good sports' about it. I don't want to delve into someone's medical problems in front of other people, but there are times I do. 'So sorry you are not able to eat bread, here are your scrambled eggs.' Or, 'My dad is allergic to eggs, too, I know how annoying it can be at breakfast to have to eat oatmeal when everyone else is having eggs.'
.
Maddie, I think for some reason that because your kitchen is actually visible to the guests, that it somehow makes them feel entitled to "order" breakfast. Do you think this is part of it? This is the only explanation that I can come up with because I think most of us have handled guests requesting something else than what is on the menu for the morning pretty much the same way that y'all have.
The only other thing that might be different is that you shop very often and don't keep much on hand, which might affect your flexibility?
I actually stopped posting the next morning's menu the evening before, because most guests said to me that they liked being surprised to see what was being served when they were seated. Our average LOS was 3 nights....did this have something to do with it? I don't know.
It's hard to tell...all B&Bs are different - location, types of guests, how we do breakfast, etc. Sorry that this continues to be an issue for you!
.
We're ok being flexible as long as people don't expect us to bend over and kiss their butts with off the cuff 'can't haves and won't eats'.

A lot of guests expect that we have a freezer full of items we will just thaw out. I pretend outrage that they think I would serve them a frozen waffle, a frozen quiche or a frozen muffin. It's freshly made or it's not on the menu. (Except the breakfast meat, that we do freeze when there's a big sale.)
I'm not sure if seeing the cook at work implies they can ask for whatever they want. Maybe it does. (Of course, if you email me a month in advance of your arrival and request something you love, that we already make, we will serve it.)
Oddly, I would think the opposite. We have an apt-sized fridge in the kitchen so I'm not understanding where they think all the ingredients are going to materialize from!
And it's really not an overwhelming problem. If it were we would really need to ask the guests why they thought it was a 'cook to order' breakfast. (Again, especially as we have told them all what was coming.)
.
Sam may be on to something here! Think of all the short order restaurants, you see the cook in action!
And while they may only see an apt. size fridge, they think you have a stock room with a large freezer.
One additional thought is the breakfast page, could be with all the pictures they think you have a menu. With pictures saying 100 words, why read!

How about trying this: Instead of posting the next mornings meal, just have "Chef's Choice - join us for something yummy."
.
copperhead said:
One additional thought is the breakfast page, could be with all the pictures they think you have a menu. With pictures saying 100 words, why read!

How about trying this: Instead of posting the next mornings meal, just have "Chef's Choice - join us for something yummy."
That might just work. Except I know I am going to get, 'If he hasn't decided yet, then we want...' and if I say he has decided, 'Then what is it?' Maybe just 'Join us for breakfast- 8AM - 9:30 AM.'
And, yes, several guests have assumed every meal on the breakfast page was going to be available every day. It's kind of disconcerting to hear, 'So, when do I get the pancakes (omelet, FT, eggs and bacon)?' And then to be accused of pulling a fast one. 'I thought everything on the breakfast page was cooked every day. That's the only reason I stayed here.' Ouch.
.
Madeleine said:
That might just work. Except I know I am going to get, 'If he hasn't decided yet, then we want...' and if I say he has decided, 'Then what is it?' Maybe just 'Join us for breakfast- 8AM - 9:30 AM.'
And, yes, several guests have assumed every meal on the breakfast page was going to be available every day. It's kind of disconcerting to hear, 'So, when do I get the pancakes (omelet, FT, eggs and bacon)?' And then to be accused of pulling a fast one. 'I thought everything on the breakfast page was cooked every day. That's the only reason I stayed here.' Ouch.
I get asked this on occasion when I ask on arrival about food allergies. I say that I choose what I make after everyone checks in. OR you could say 'If I told you I'd have to shoot you' - Oh wait, you aren't Proud Texan! lol
 

Penelope

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Odd, I have found the bedskirts are too long and I am hemming all of them this month. I will say that I got a great bedskirt at JCP that actually has added matching fabric where it drapes over the boxspring so on that one bed I never see the muslin part of the bedskirt.
Peeve 5- One 50 gallon trash container's worth from one room on a one night stay.
Peeve 6- Please don't show up on the wrong day and blame me.
My peeves are pretty standard-
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning.
)
Don't show up 6 hours early and expect to check in..
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!

.
copperhead said:
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!
Note I said 'no reason'. Anything that comes up in the morning is unreasonable.

I really need to think that thru now. How to handle the morning breakfast issues they neglected to tell us about after all the opportunities to do so.
I guess what really gets me is the guest then expects us to make what they want. 'I can't have that, but I can have this...' something not at all on the agenda. There are days we really, seriously do NOT have whole wheat bread to make toast with. This is considered a crime of some sort by some guests.
'OK, then, I'll have a muffin. No muffins??!! How about some banana bread? Really? No banana bread??? What exactly are you running here if I can't get breakfast?'
The list of things I've been asked for when a guest doesn't want what's being served is amazing.
.
Okay, I guess the discussion should start with how you are doing breakfast that they feel that they can do this to you. I've had only one or two people try this, ever. So, something in the way that you set up breakfast is making them feel entitled to do this...
I'll explain how we have things set up and they maybe we can look at how you do it.
When a guest arrives for breakfast we have both a table of 6 set up and a counter for 2 set up. (We can push it to 8 and 3 if we have to.) On the table is the orange juice, milk, water. There is also usually a plate of something like muffins, danish, cheese or meat on the table as well. The first dish (ie yogurt, fruit, etc) is set up for them as well. In the centre of the table is jam, honey, nutella, etc along with spoons so that they don't cross contaminate. Sugar and cream are there as well. Coffee is in a carafe on the table and labelled. (I've never had anyone ask for other juices, either, but then we don't stock any other juices, really.)
On the far wall are two stations. Station 1 has cereal including oatmeal with bowls and packets for hot chocolate. Station 2 has a hot water dispenser, our coffee maker (coffee has been poured into the carafe to keep it hot, but the coffee maker is set up to make another pot in an emergency. And next to this is a pod brewer in case we need decaf or they want flavoured brown water. On the mantle is a selection of teast including green, decaf and black. On the counter next to the two spots are bagel and bread and the toaster. Then we usually announce saying "... and today we are making..." and that's that. We leave no room for orders, we don't ask. If they have an issue they will usually tell me that they don't want what I'm serving and at that point I simply say "enjoy the other items." or if I have time, offer a plain omelette or french toast.
If I have someone who is gluten free, I usually point out the items we have and tell them that if they want bread or toast to tell me, since we keep it frozen. If I have prepared for them, I have usually done it, first, so nothing cross contaminates and I can rewarm or reuse what is left for the rest of the guests.
If they tell me a food issue at the breakfast table, I'm attentive, but if impossible to accomodate I simply say that I'm sorry they didn't tell me ahead of time so we could prepaer something and offer the alternatives that are available. I don't take orders and I don't ask them what they want, ever! When you ask question you invite people to fill them in as they wish... and eggs benedict can be a possibility and it's too many steps! Can I make you a plain omelette instead?
As for bread, we usually only carry a whole wheat and not white, we carry bagels (sliced in half) and we can pull frozen bagels out of the freezer in an emergency. But they don't get a selection of bread either. It's what's next to the toaster. They make do.
.
We don't have anything out except the juice, coffee & tea. And the cereal, which is out all the time. If bread is part of the meal it's plated along with the entree. We have been telling the guests, 'This is what is for breakfast,' when they arrive. That way, the assumption was, if there was an issue they forgot to mention, now's the time.
We may stop that and announce breakfast in the morning, as has happened to us everywhere we have ever gone!
What makes guests think they can request anything is not my asking them what else can we get for them if they can't eat what we're serving. I don't know what it is. If someone suddenly discovers at 8 AM that they are gluten intolerant on a day we have FT then I will offer, if it is at all possible, scrambled eggs. But I ask the cook first if there are enough eggs for that. And if he feels like going out of his way.
We've had parents say to their kids, 'What would you like honey? Pancakes? Eggs? Waffles? FT?' I have to stop them right there and say, 'The breakfast is this...' A lot of times the parents will say, 'Then just a bagel for me.' WHERE did they see a bakery sign anywhere in my house?
Lots and lots of spouses will come to the kitchen after they see someone else being served and say, 'My spouse can't eat that.' Why the spouse didn't mention it when told what was coming is always a mystery.
Another one is someone saying they'll have bacon with the breakfast when sausage was given to them.
I had the patriarch of a family of 4, when a potato pie was set in front of them (after they were told what was coming) tell me, 'We do not eat potatoes for breakfast.' Period. Dad pushed the plate back at me. We were new at the time so we made that family a whole different breakfast. (Same family demanded we handle their lost luggage claim while they went out for the day and dented my car. They were just in the wrong place.)
My guess is that guests of all kinds were able to order breakfast to suit at other B&B's. Or the only other B&B's they've ever stayed at have a menu. (There are 2 of them in my town...just about anything you want is available every morning.)
We really do not keep frozen anything except breakfast meats.
The backup plan is scrambled eggs for gluten-intolerant guests and cereal and toast for egg intolerant guests. Everyone who wants it can have the breakfast meat with those choices.
The problem really lies in treating these complaining guests differently than other guests who are still sitting there eating something they may not have wanted either, but being 'good sports' about it. I don't want to delve into someone's medical problems in front of other people, but there are times I do. 'So sorry you are not able to eat bread, here are your scrambled eggs.' Or, 'My dad is allergic to eggs, too, I know how annoying it can be at breakfast to have to eat oatmeal when everyone else is having eggs.'
.
Maddie, I think for some reason that because your kitchen is actually visible to the guests, that it somehow makes them feel entitled to "order" breakfast. Do you think this is part of it? This is the only explanation that I can come up with because I think most of us have handled guests requesting something else than what is on the menu for the morning pretty much the same way that y'all have.
The only other thing that might be different is that you shop very often and don't keep much on hand, which might affect your flexibility?
I actually stopped posting the next morning's menu the evening before, because most guests said to me that they liked being surprised to see what was being served when they were seated. Our average LOS was 3 nights....did this have something to do with it? I don't know.
It's hard to tell...all B&Bs are different - location, types of guests, how we do breakfast, etc. Sorry that this continues to be an issue for you!
.
We're ok being flexible as long as people don't expect us to bend over and kiss their butts with off the cuff 'can't haves and won't eats'.

A lot of guests expect that we have a freezer full of items we will just thaw out. I pretend outrage that they think I would serve them a frozen waffle, a frozen quiche or a frozen muffin. It's freshly made or it's not on the menu. (Except the breakfast meat, that we do freeze when there's a big sale.)
I'm not sure if seeing the cook at work implies they can ask for whatever they want. Maybe it does. (Of course, if you email me a month in advance of your arrival and request something you love, that we already make, we will serve it.)
Oddly, I would think the opposite. We have an apt-sized fridge in the kitchen so I'm not understanding where they think all the ingredients are going to materialize from!
And it's really not an overwhelming problem. If it were we would really need to ask the guests why they thought it was a 'cook to order' breakfast. (Again, especially as we have told them all what was coming.)
.
Maddie, My kichen is in view as well but haven't had a problem. Only once someone saw I was making omelots and asked me to be sparse on the cheese. I state chef's choice and accomodate those who have told me in advance of thier preferences.
I have a small kichen, too, with a small refrig! We are just alike!
.
Mtatoc said:
Maddie, My kichen is in view as well but haven't had a problem. Only once someone saw I was making omelots and asked me to be sparse on the cheese. I state chef's choice and accomodate those who have told me in advance of thier preferences.
I have a small kichen, too, with a small refrig! We are just alike!
Are you sure it's not because your DH is standing there with his shotgun?

.
Madeleine said:
Mtatoc said:
Maddie, My kichen is in view as well but haven't had a problem. Only once someone saw I was making omelots and asked me to be sparse on the cheese. I state chef's choice and accomodate those who have told me in advance of thier preferences.
I have a small kichen, too, with a small refrig! We are just alike!
Are you sure it's not because your DH is standing there with his shotgun?
There's your solution ;)
 

Proud Texan

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Odd, I have found the bedskirts are too long and I am hemming all of them this month. I will say that I got a great bedskirt at JCP that actually has added matching fabric where it drapes over the boxspring so on that one bed I never see the muslin part of the bedskirt.
Peeve 5- One 50 gallon trash container's worth from one room on a one night stay.
Peeve 6- Please don't show up on the wrong day and blame me.
My peeves are pretty standard-
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning.
)
Don't show up 6 hours early and expect to check in..
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!

.
copperhead said:
Don't tell me you can't eat that when I set it in front of you. You knew the day before what was for breakfast. (We're getting a little more aggressive on this during the year. Asking again on arrival so there is NO reason for ANY problems in the morning. )
You really think this will solve this? It won't, I can attest to that!
Note I said 'no reason'. Anything that comes up in the morning is unreasonable.

I really need to think that thru now. How to handle the morning breakfast issues they neglected to tell us about after all the opportunities to do so.
I guess what really gets me is the guest then expects us to make what they want. 'I can't have that, but I can have this...' something not at all on the agenda. There are days we really, seriously do NOT have whole wheat bread to make toast with. This is considered a crime of some sort by some guests.
'OK, then, I'll have a muffin. No muffins??!! How about some banana bread? Really? No banana bread??? What exactly are you running here if I can't get breakfast?'
The list of things I've been asked for when a guest doesn't want what's being served is amazing.
.
Okay, I guess the discussion should start with how you are doing breakfast that they feel that they can do this to you. I've had only one or two people try this, ever. So, something in the way that you set up breakfast is making them feel entitled to do this...
I'll explain how we have things set up and they maybe we can look at how you do it.
When a guest arrives for breakfast we have both a table of 6 set up and a counter for 2 set up. (We can push it to 8 and 3 if we have to.) On the table is the orange juice, milk, water. There is also usually a plate of something like muffins, danish, cheese or meat on the table as well. The first dish (ie yogurt, fruit, etc) is set up for them as well. In the centre of the table is jam, honey, nutella, etc along with spoons so that they don't cross contaminate. Sugar and cream are there as well. Coffee is in a carafe on the table and labelled. (I've never had anyone ask for other juices, either, but then we don't stock any other juices, really.)
On the far wall are two stations. Station 1 has cereal including oatmeal with bowls and packets for hot chocolate. Station 2 has a hot water dispenser, our coffee maker (coffee has been poured into the carafe to keep it hot, but the coffee maker is set up to make another pot in an emergency. And next to this is a pod brewer in case we need decaf or they want flavoured brown water. On the mantle is a selection of teast including green, decaf and black. On the counter next to the two spots are bagel and bread and the toaster. Then we usually announce saying "... and today we are making..." and that's that. We leave no room for orders, we don't ask. If they have an issue they will usually tell me that they don't want what I'm serving and at that point I simply say "enjoy the other items." or if I have time, offer a plain omelette or french toast.
If I have someone who is gluten free, I usually point out the items we have and tell them that if they want bread or toast to tell me, since we keep it frozen. If I have prepared for them, I have usually done it, first, so nothing cross contaminates and I can rewarm or reuse what is left for the rest of the guests.
If they tell me a food issue at the breakfast table, I'm attentive, but if impossible to accomodate I simply say that I'm sorry they didn't tell me ahead of time so we could prepaer something and offer the alternatives that are available. I don't take orders and I don't ask them what they want, ever! When you ask question you invite people to fill them in as they wish... and eggs benedict can be a possibility and it's too many steps! Can I make you a plain omelette instead?
As for bread, we usually only carry a whole wheat and not white, we carry bagels (sliced in half) and we can pull frozen bagels out of the freezer in an emergency. But they don't get a selection of bread either. It's what's next to the toaster. They make do.
.
We don't have anything out except the juice, coffee & tea. And the cereal, which is out all the time. If bread is part of the meal it's plated along with the entree. We have been telling the guests, 'This is what is for breakfast,' when they arrive. That way, the assumption was, if there was an issue they forgot to mention, now's the time.
We may stop that and announce breakfast in the morning, as has happened to us everywhere we have ever gone!
What makes guests think they can request anything is not my asking them what else can we get for them if they can't eat what we're serving. I don't know what it is. If someone suddenly discovers at 8 AM that they are gluten intolerant on a day we have FT then I will offer, if it is at all possible, scrambled eggs. But I ask the cook first if there are enough eggs for that. And if he feels like going out of his way.
We've had parents say to their kids, 'What would you like honey? Pancakes? Eggs? Waffles? FT?' I have to stop them right there and say, 'The breakfast is this...' A lot of times the parents will say, 'Then just a bagel for me.' WHERE did they see a bakery sign anywhere in my house?
Lots and lots of spouses will come to the kitchen after they see someone else being served and say, 'My spouse can't eat that.' Why the spouse didn't mention it when told what was coming is always a mystery.
Another one is someone saying they'll have bacon with the breakfast when sausage was given to them.
I had the patriarch of a family of 4, when a potato pie was set in front of them (after they were told what was coming) tell me, 'We do not eat potatoes for breakfast.' Period. Dad pushed the plate back at me. We were new at the time so we made that family a whole different breakfast. (Same family demanded we handle their lost luggage claim while they went out for the day and dented my car. They were just in the wrong place.)
My guess is that guests of all kinds were able to order breakfast to suit at other B&B's. Or the only other B&B's they've ever stayed at have a menu. (There are 2 of them in my town...just about anything you want is available every morning.)
We really do not keep frozen anything except breakfast meats.
The backup plan is scrambled eggs for gluten-intolerant guests and cereal and toast for egg intolerant guests. Everyone who wants it can have the breakfast meat with those choices.
The problem really lies in treating these complaining guests differently than other guests who are still sitting there eating something they may not have wanted either, but being 'good sports' about it. I don't want to delve into someone's medical problems in front of other people, but there are times I do. 'So sorry you are not able to eat bread, here are your scrambled eggs.' Or, 'My dad is allergic to eggs, too, I know how annoying it can be at breakfast to have to eat oatmeal when everyone else is having eggs.'
.
Maddie, I think for some reason that because your kitchen is actually visible to the guests, that it somehow makes them feel entitled to "order" breakfast. Do you think this is part of it? This is the only explanation that I can come up with because I think most of us have handled guests requesting something else than what is on the menu for the morning pretty much the same way that y'all have.
The only other thing that might be different is that you shop very often and don't keep much on hand, which might affect your flexibility?
I actually stopped posting the next morning's menu the evening before, because most guests said to me that they liked being surprised to see what was being served when they were seated. Our average LOS was 3 nights....did this have something to do with it? I don't know.
It's hard to tell...all B&Bs are different - location, types of guests, how we do breakfast, etc. Sorry that this continues to be an issue for you!
.
We're ok being flexible as long as people don't expect us to bend over and kiss their butts with off the cuff 'can't haves and won't eats'.

A lot of guests expect that we have a freezer full of items we will just thaw out. I pretend outrage that they think I would serve them a frozen waffle, a frozen quiche or a frozen muffin. It's freshly made or it's not on the menu. (Except the breakfast meat, that we do freeze when there's a big sale.)
I'm not sure if seeing the cook at work implies they can ask for whatever they want. Maybe it does. (Of course, if you email me a month in advance of your arrival and request something you love, that we already make, we will serve it.)
Oddly, I would think the opposite. We have an apt-sized fridge in the kitchen so I'm not understanding where they think all the ingredients are going to materialize from!
And it's really not an overwhelming problem. If it were we would really need to ask the guests why they thought it was a 'cook to order' breakfast. (Again, especially as we have told them all what was coming.)
.
Maddie, My kichen is in view as well but haven't had a problem. Only once someone saw I was making omelots and asked me to be sparse on the cheese. I state chef's choice and accomodate those who have told me in advance of thier preferences.
I have a small kichen, too, with a small refrig! We are just alike!
.
Mtatoc said:
Maddie, My kichen is in view as well but haven't had a problem. Only once someone saw I was making omelots and asked me to be sparse on the cheese. I state chef's choice and accomodate those who have told me in advance of thier preferences.
I have a small kichen, too, with a small refrig! We are just alike!
Are you sure it's not because your DH is standing there with his shotgun?

.
Madeleine said:
Mtatoc said:
Maddie, My kichen is in view as well but haven't had a problem. Only once someone saw I was making omelots and asked me to be sparse on the cheese. I state chef's choice and accomodate those who have told me in advance of thier preferences.
I have a small kichen, too, with a small refrig! We are just alike!
Are you sure it's not because your DH is standing there with his shotgun?
There's your solution ;)
.
Penelope said:
Madeleine said:
Mtatoc said:
Maddie, My kichen is in view as well but haven't had a problem. Only once someone saw I was making omelots and asked me to be sparse on the cheese. I state chef's choice and accomodate those who have told me in advance of thier preferences.
I have a small kichen, too, with a small refrig! We are just alike!
Are you sure it's not because your DH is standing there with his shotgun?
There's your solution ;)
I call it my PITA widow maker.

 

Silverspoon

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Men who can't hit the toilet.
Women who use our best towels as catch all for the men who can't seem to hit the toilet.
Those heavy tread shoes that track in mud and the people who wear them inside after a muddy walk, day after day. Don't they see all that mud on the carpet?
Early arrivals. They have been verbally told that we do not accept arrivals before 3. It is in writing on their confirmation along side the time they told us they would be arriving. Still, there they are are 1pm wanting to use the bathroom and drop off the luggage.
Moisture rings on the piano from wet glass. We have almost every horizontal surface covered with glass and coasters all over the place. So where do they decide to put the wet glass? Ugh...not just once but over and over.
Then there are the guests who bring half the beach back with them and dump it all over the floor. What doesn't get dumped on the wood floors is in the tub....the rest is clogging the drain pipe.
Wet towels hung on the wooden doors and furniture. Duhhh, that's what all those hooks and towel bars are for!
 

Madeleine

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Men who can't hit the toilet.
Women who use our best towels as catch all for the men who can't seem to hit the toilet.
Those heavy tread shoes that track in mud and the people who wear them inside after a muddy walk, day after day. Don't they see all that mud on the carpet?
Early arrivals. They have been verbally told that we do not accept arrivals before 3. It is in writing on their confirmation along side the time they told us they would be arriving. Still, there they are are 1pm wanting to use the bathroom and drop off the luggage.
Moisture rings on the piano from wet glass. We have almost every horizontal surface covered with glass and coasters all over the place. So where do they decide to put the wet glass? Ugh...not just once but over and over.
Then there are the guests who bring half the beach back with them and dump it all over the floor. What doesn't get dumped on the wood floors is in the tub....the rest is clogging the drain pipe.
Wet towels hung on the wooden doors and furniture. Duhhh, that's what all those hooks and towel bars are for!.
I took my shoes off, put them in the way back of the car and forgot them until yesterday after I traipsed thru a wet field while we were on vacation. I put my slippers on in the driveway of the B&B so I wouldn't track into the house. This is only because of what I've learned in the past few years!
When we first got here, every old-time innkeeper would come to the door and stand on the mat saying, 'I know you just cleaned...'
I kept having to say, 'Come on in, there's a vacuum or a mop for anything you drag in.' But it was very easy to pick out either the new innkeepers or those that had full time help!
 

JBloggs

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Men who can't hit the toilet.
Women who use our best towels as catch all for the men who can't seem to hit the toilet.
Those heavy tread shoes that track in mud and the people who wear them inside after a muddy walk, day after day. Don't they see all that mud on the carpet?
Early arrivals. They have been verbally told that we do not accept arrivals before 3. It is in writing on their confirmation along side the time they told us they would be arriving. Still, there they are are 1pm wanting to use the bathroom and drop off the luggage.
Moisture rings on the piano from wet glass. We have almost every horizontal surface covered with glass and coasters all over the place. So where do they decide to put the wet glass? Ugh...not just once but over and over.
Then there are the guests who bring half the beach back with them and dump it all over the floor. What doesn't get dumped on the wood floors is in the tub....the rest is clogging the drain pipe.
Wet towels hung on the wooden doors and furniture. Duhhh, that's what all those hooks and towel bars are for!.
I took my shoes off, put them in the way back of the car and forgot them until yesterday after I traipsed thru a wet field while we were on vacation. I put my slippers on in the driveway of the B&B so I wouldn't track into the house. This is only because of what I've learned in the past few years!
When we first got here, every old-time innkeeper would come to the door and stand on the mat saying, 'I know you just cleaned...'
I kept having to say, 'Come on in, there's a vacuum or a mop for anything you drag in.' But it was very easy to pick out either the new innkeepers or those that had full time help!
.
You just brought to mind that guest who walked in from the rain and stood on our foyer rug and scraped her feet all up and down it like it was an outside doormat. I have never before seen anyone do that, nor since.

 

Madeleine

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Men who can't hit the toilet.
Women who use our best towels as catch all for the men who can't seem to hit the toilet.
Those heavy tread shoes that track in mud and the people who wear them inside after a muddy walk, day after day. Don't they see all that mud on the carpet?
Early arrivals. They have been verbally told that we do not accept arrivals before 3. It is in writing on their confirmation along side the time they told us they would be arriving. Still, there they are are 1pm wanting to use the bathroom and drop off the luggage.
Moisture rings on the piano from wet glass. We have almost every horizontal surface covered with glass and coasters all over the place. So where do they decide to put the wet glass? Ugh...not just once but over and over.
Then there are the guests who bring half the beach back with them and dump it all over the floor. What doesn't get dumped on the wood floors is in the tub....the rest is clogging the drain pipe.
Wet towels hung on the wooden doors and furniture. Duhhh, that's what all those hooks and towel bars are for!.
I took my shoes off, put them in the way back of the car and forgot them until yesterday after I traipsed thru a wet field while we were on vacation. I put my slippers on in the driveway of the B&B so I wouldn't track into the house. This is only because of what I've learned in the past few years!
When we first got here, every old-time innkeeper would come to the door and stand on the mat saying, 'I know you just cleaned...'
I kept having to say, 'Come on in, there's a vacuum or a mop for anything you drag in.' But it was very easy to pick out either the new innkeepers or those that had full time help!
.
You just brought to mind that guest who walked in from the rain and stood on our foyer rug and scraped her feet all up and down it like it was an outside doormat. I have never before seen anyone do that, nor since.

.
And you with a porch and everything!
We have no outside mat so I have a cheapo (pretty, but cheap) rug right inside the door. It's the only place to wipe feet but I would be peeved if someone had the opportunity to clean up outside and didn't!
 

Copperhead

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Men who can't hit the toilet.
Women who use our best towels as catch all for the men who can't seem to hit the toilet.
Those heavy tread shoes that track in mud and the people who wear them inside after a muddy walk, day after day. Don't they see all that mud on the carpet?
Early arrivals. They have been verbally told that we do not accept arrivals before 3. It is in writing on their confirmation along side the time they told us they would be arriving. Still, there they are are 1pm wanting to use the bathroom and drop off the luggage.
Moisture rings on the piano from wet glass. We have almost every horizontal surface covered with glass and coasters all over the place. So where do they decide to put the wet glass? Ugh...not just once but over and over.
Then there are the guests who bring half the beach back with them and dump it all over the floor. What doesn't get dumped on the wood floors is in the tub....the rest is clogging the drain pipe.
Wet towels hung on the wooden doors and furniture. Duhhh, that's what all those hooks and towel bars are for!.
I took my shoes off, put them in the way back of the car and forgot them until yesterday after I traipsed thru a wet field while we were on vacation. I put my slippers on in the driveway of the B&B so I wouldn't track into the house. This is only because of what I've learned in the past few years!
When we first got here, every old-time innkeeper would come to the door and stand on the mat saying, 'I know you just cleaned...'
I kept having to say, 'Come on in, there's a vacuum or a mop for anything you drag in.' But it was very easy to pick out either the new innkeepers or those that had full time help!
.
You just brought to mind that guest who walked in from the rain and stood on our foyer rug and scraped her feet all up and down it like it was an outside doormat. I have never before seen anyone do that, nor since.

.
Joey Bloggs said:
You just brought to mind that guest who walked in from the rain and stood on our foyer rug and scraped her feet all up and down it like it was an outside doormat. I have never before seen anyone do that, nor since.
Only that once! I can't count the times we had people walk in and do the same on my Persian wool rug after walking over an 8x10 outdoor rug on my veranda. Wool rug now gone from the tile center hall, they now (sometimes) step back out the door.
 

Generic

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Men who can't hit the toilet.
Women who use our best towels as catch all for the men who can't seem to hit the toilet.
Those heavy tread shoes that track in mud and the people who wear them inside after a muddy walk, day after day. Don't they see all that mud on the carpet?
Early arrivals. They have been verbally told that we do not accept arrivals before 3. It is in writing on their confirmation along side the time they told us they would be arriving. Still, there they are are 1pm wanting to use the bathroom and drop off the luggage.
Moisture rings on the piano from wet glass. We have almost every horizontal surface covered with glass and coasters all over the place. So where do they decide to put the wet glass? Ugh...not just once but over and over.
Then there are the guests who bring half the beach back with them and dump it all over the floor. What doesn't get dumped on the wood floors is in the tub....the rest is clogging the drain pipe.
Wet towels hung on the wooden doors and furniture. Duhhh, that's what all those hooks and towel bars are for!.
I took my shoes off, put them in the way back of the car and forgot them until yesterday after I traipsed thru a wet field while we were on vacation. I put my slippers on in the driveway of the B&B so I wouldn't track into the house. This is only because of what I've learned in the past few years!
When we first got here, every old-time innkeeper would come to the door and stand on the mat saying, 'I know you just cleaned...'
I kept having to say, 'Come on in, there's a vacuum or a mop for anything you drag in.' But it was very easy to pick out either the new innkeepers or those that had full time help!
.
You just brought to mind that guest who walked in from the rain and stood on our foyer rug and scraped her feet all up and down it like it was an outside doormat. I have never before seen anyone do that, nor since.

.
How about the idiots who bring their snowy wet shoes up to their room to put on my wood floor. So, I have a wet warped spot with dried grey water marks and gravel, to scratch the varnish.
 

Madeleine

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Joined
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Messages
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Men who can't hit the toilet.
Women who use our best towels as catch all for the men who can't seem to hit the toilet.
Those heavy tread shoes that track in mud and the people who wear them inside after a muddy walk, day after day. Don't they see all that mud on the carpet?
Early arrivals. They have been verbally told that we do not accept arrivals before 3. It is in writing on their confirmation along side the time they told us they would be arriving. Still, there they are are 1pm wanting to use the bathroom and drop off the luggage.
Moisture rings on the piano from wet glass. We have almost every horizontal surface covered with glass and coasters all over the place. So where do they decide to put the wet glass? Ugh...not just once but over and over.
Then there are the guests who bring half the beach back with them and dump it all over the floor. What doesn't get dumped on the wood floors is in the tub....the rest is clogging the drain pipe.
Wet towels hung on the wooden doors and furniture. Duhhh, that's what all those hooks and towel bars are for!.
I took my shoes off, put them in the way back of the car and forgot them until yesterday after I traipsed thru a wet field while we were on vacation. I put my slippers on in the driveway of the B&B so I wouldn't track into the house. This is only because of what I've learned in the past few years!
When we first got here, every old-time innkeeper would come to the door and stand on the mat saying, 'I know you just cleaned...'
I kept having to say, 'Come on in, there's a vacuum or a mop for anything you drag in.' But it was very easy to pick out either the new innkeepers or those that had full time help!
.
You just brought to mind that guest who walked in from the rain and stood on our foyer rug and scraped her feet all up and down it like it was an outside doormat. I have never before seen anyone do that, nor since.

.
How about the idiots who bring their snowy wet shoes up to their room to put on my wood floor. So, I have a wet warped spot with dried grey water marks and gravel, to scratch the varnish.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
How about the idiots who bring their snowy wet shoes up to their room to put on my wood floor. So, I have a wet warped spot with dried grey water marks and gravel, to scratch the varnish.
We put boot trays in all the rooms because of this. I know Canadians take their shoes off at the door, but a lot of other nationalities don't so we prepare for that.
 

Generic

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Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
7,631
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140
Men who can't hit the toilet.
Women who use our best towels as catch all for the men who can't seem to hit the toilet.
Those heavy tread shoes that track in mud and the people who wear them inside after a muddy walk, day after day. Don't they see all that mud on the carpet?
Early arrivals. They have been verbally told that we do not accept arrivals before 3. It is in writing on their confirmation along side the time they told us they would be arriving. Still, there they are are 1pm wanting to use the bathroom and drop off the luggage.
Moisture rings on the piano from wet glass. We have almost every horizontal surface covered with glass and coasters all over the place. So where do they decide to put the wet glass? Ugh...not just once but over and over.
Then there are the guests who bring half the beach back with them and dump it all over the floor. What doesn't get dumped on the wood floors is in the tub....the rest is clogging the drain pipe.
Wet towels hung on the wooden doors and furniture. Duhhh, that's what all those hooks and towel bars are for!.
I took my shoes off, put them in the way back of the car and forgot them until yesterday after I traipsed thru a wet field while we were on vacation. I put my slippers on in the driveway of the B&B so I wouldn't track into the house. This is only because of what I've learned in the past few years!
When we first got here, every old-time innkeeper would come to the door and stand on the mat saying, 'I know you just cleaned...'
I kept having to say, 'Come on in, there's a vacuum or a mop for anything you drag in.' But it was very easy to pick out either the new innkeepers or those that had full time help!
.
You just brought to mind that guest who walked in from the rain and stood on our foyer rug and scraped her feet all up and down it like it was an outside doormat. I have never before seen anyone do that, nor since.

.
How about the idiots who bring their snowy wet shoes up to their room to put on my wood floor. So, I have a wet warped spot with dried grey water marks and gravel, to scratch the varnish.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
How about the idiots who bring their snowy wet shoes up to their room to put on my wood floor. So, I have a wet warped spot with dried grey water marks and gravel, to scratch the varnish.
We put boot trays in all the rooms because of this. I know Canadians take their shoes off at the door, but a lot of other nationalities don't so we prepare for that.
.
We have boot trays at the front of the house and a sign that ask people to kindly remove wet shoes. And I watch when they come in the first time. We even have a spot under the heating element for wet shoes to get warm and dry out. But there is that one idiot who always thinks that their shoes are so precious that they need to ruin the floors. (Oh and they put their shoes on my white towels or wipe the floor with my white towels.) Maybe I should put a boot tray... for the stupid. Do they make boot trays that says "STUPID, THE SHOES GO HERE!"
 

Weaver

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Men who can't hit the toilet.
Women who use our best towels as catch all for the men who can't seem to hit the toilet.
Those heavy tread shoes that track in mud and the people who wear them inside after a muddy walk, day after day. Don't they see all that mud on the carpet?
Early arrivals. They have been verbally told that we do not accept arrivals before 3. It is in writing on their confirmation along side the time they told us they would be arriving. Still, there they are are 1pm wanting to use the bathroom and drop off the luggage.
Moisture rings on the piano from wet glass. We have almost every horizontal surface covered with glass and coasters all over the place. So where do they decide to put the wet glass? Ugh...not just once but over and over.
Then there are the guests who bring half the beach back with them and dump it all over the floor. What doesn't get dumped on the wood floors is in the tub....the rest is clogging the drain pipe.
Wet towels hung on the wooden doors and furniture. Duhhh, that's what all those hooks and towel bars are for!.
I took my shoes off, put them in the way back of the car and forgot them until yesterday after I traipsed thru a wet field while we were on vacation. I put my slippers on in the driveway of the B&B so I wouldn't track into the house. This is only because of what I've learned in the past few years!
When we first got here, every old-time innkeeper would come to the door and stand on the mat saying, 'I know you just cleaned...'
I kept having to say, 'Come on in, there's a vacuum or a mop for anything you drag in.' But it was very easy to pick out either the new innkeepers or those that had full time help!
.
You just brought to mind that guest who walked in from the rain and stood on our foyer rug and scraped her feet all up and down it like it was an outside doormat. I have never before seen anyone do that, nor since.

.
How about the idiots who bring their snowy wet shoes up to their room to put on my wood floor. So, I have a wet warped spot with dried grey water marks and gravel, to scratch the varnish.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
How about the idiots who bring their snowy wet shoes up to their room to put on my wood floor. So, I have a wet warped spot with dried grey water marks and gravel, to scratch the varnish.
We put boot trays in all the rooms because of this. I know Canadians take their shoes off at the door, but a lot of other nationalities don't so we prepare for that.
.
We have boot trays at the front of the house and a sign that ask people to kindly remove wet shoes. And I watch when they come in the first time. We even have a spot under the heating element for wet shoes to get warm and dry out. But there is that one idiot who always thinks that their shoes are so precious that they need to ruin the floors. (Oh and they put their shoes on my white towels or wipe the floor with my white towels.) Maybe I should put a boot tray... for the stupid. Do they make boot trays that says "STUPID, THE SHOES GO HERE!"
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
We have boot trays at the front of the house and a sign that ask people to kindly remove wet shoes. And I watch when they come in the first time. We even have a spot under the heating element for wet shoes to get warm and dry out. But there is that one idiot who always thinks that their shoes are so precious that they need to ruin the floors. (Oh and they put their shoes on my white towels or wipe the floor with my white towels.) Maybe I should put a boot tray... for the stupid. Do they make boot trays that says "STUPID, THE SHOES GO HERE!"
IDK but maybe that could be another income stream!
Boot trays for the challenged! ;-)
 

Madeleine

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Joined
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Messages
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Men who can't hit the toilet.
Women who use our best towels as catch all for the men who can't seem to hit the toilet.
Those heavy tread shoes that track in mud and the people who wear them inside after a muddy walk, day after day. Don't they see all that mud on the carpet?
Early arrivals. They have been verbally told that we do not accept arrivals before 3. It is in writing on their confirmation along side the time they told us they would be arriving. Still, there they are are 1pm wanting to use the bathroom and drop off the luggage.
Moisture rings on the piano from wet glass. We have almost every horizontal surface covered with glass and coasters all over the place. So where do they decide to put the wet glass? Ugh...not just once but over and over.
Then there are the guests who bring half the beach back with them and dump it all over the floor. What doesn't get dumped on the wood floors is in the tub....the rest is clogging the drain pipe.
Wet towels hung on the wooden doors and furniture. Duhhh, that's what all those hooks and towel bars are for!.
I took my shoes off, put them in the way back of the car and forgot them until yesterday after I traipsed thru a wet field while we were on vacation. I put my slippers on in the driveway of the B&B so I wouldn't track into the house. This is only because of what I've learned in the past few years!
When we first got here, every old-time innkeeper would come to the door and stand on the mat saying, 'I know you just cleaned...'
I kept having to say, 'Come on in, there's a vacuum or a mop for anything you drag in.' But it was very easy to pick out either the new innkeepers or those that had full time help!
.
You just brought to mind that guest who walked in from the rain and stood on our foyer rug and scraped her feet all up and down it like it was an outside doormat. I have never before seen anyone do that, nor since.

.
How about the idiots who bring their snowy wet shoes up to their room to put on my wood floor. So, I have a wet warped spot with dried grey water marks and gravel, to scratch the varnish.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
How about the idiots who bring their snowy wet shoes up to their room to put on my wood floor. So, I have a wet warped spot with dried grey water marks and gravel, to scratch the varnish.
We put boot trays in all the rooms because of this. I know Canadians take their shoes off at the door, but a lot of other nationalities don't so we prepare for that.
.
We have boot trays at the front of the house and a sign that ask people to kindly remove wet shoes. And I watch when they come in the first time. We even have a spot under the heating element for wet shoes to get warm and dry out. But there is that one idiot who always thinks that their shoes are so precious that they need to ruin the floors. (Oh and they put their shoes on my white towels or wipe the floor with my white towels.) Maybe I should put a boot tray... for the stupid. Do they make boot trays that says "STUPID, THE SHOES GO HERE!"
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
Maybe I should put a boot tray... for the stupid. Do they make boot trays that says "STUPID, THE SHOES GO HERE!"
They do have boot trays with outlines of shoes...reinforcing what they're for, I guess! Just saw stacks of them at the store today. $3/each. Sure beats the cost and aggro fo cleaning the carpets.
 

JBloggs

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I was ready, I was here at 4pm for check in. They arrived at 930PM last night. I freshened their room today and found movie tickets from yesterday to a 6pm show. The movie theater is three blocks from us, could have checked in first? I am sure they could have.
I will not, I confirm, I will not be held hostage by checking-in every guest in person, I don't care what the heck anyone else says! At 6pm if they are not here or have called first to say they are late, they will have a self check in note.
EVEN SO...as you all know, we wait thinking they might not be able to get in, yeah they should be able to, but people are inacapable of doing some basic things sometimes...
Now, having said all that, they are very nice. Because I do not like waiting 5 1/2 hours past the time they said they would arrive doesn't mean I don't think they are nice people. They are normal people.
 

Copperhead

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I was ready, I was here at 4pm for check in. They arrived at 930PM last night. I freshened their room today and found movie tickets from yesterday to a 6pm show. The movie theater is three blocks from us, could have checked in first? I am sure they could have.
I will not, I confirm, I will not be held hostage by checking-in every guest in person, I don't care what the heck anyone else says! At 6pm if they are not here or have called first to say they are late, they will have a self check in note.
EVEN SO...as you all know, we wait thinking they might not be able to get in, yeah they should be able to, but people are inacapable of doing some basic things sometimes...
Now, having said all that, they are very nice. Because I do not like waiting 5 1/2 hours past the time they said they would arrive doesn't mean I don't think they are nice people. They are normal people.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
They are normal people.
Right! They are focused on being on vacation, not our policies & times. Set out the self check-in note and get on with your family life. They will do what they WANT to do, we can at least do what we can to be normal too.

 
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