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Don Draper

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I use a Mac, and my internet browser is Safari. For those using Reservation Key on this forum (two who I know, JB and Sunshine), this is the warning message I get when I click on one of your "Book It Now" buttons:
"Safari can't verify the identity of the website "v2.reservationkey.com". The certificate for this website was signed by an unknown certifying authority. You might be connecting to a website that is pretending to be "v2.reservationkey.com", which could put your confidential information at risk. Would you like to connect to the website anyway?"
I then have the option to "Show Certificate", or to cancel, or to continue.
Does anyone else get this security notification using a different browser? Is this just an issue with how the reservation key website/portal is set up? Any of you tech folks think this is an issue?
Thanks.
 

JBloggs

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I have shared this info with John at Rezkey. Thanks for saving the error code, that will help. Cheers!
 

swirt

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Anytime a potential guest gets a "security warning" it is, in my opinion, important. Most people don't fully understand the warning and just assume there is a security issue and run away to the next site that offers what they want but doesn't generate a warning.
 

JBloggs

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I emailed his reply to this to you off forum. It is fairly lengthy and might have the solution if you want to give it another try now.
 

Don Draper

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Just read JB's email response from John at RezKey. I firstly have to say how impressed I am that this inquiry was received AND reconciled ON A SUNDAY...wow! The issue is gone, through Safari I no longer get the security message.
It seems my browser did not have RezKey's SSL issuing company on its list of approved issuers. The issuer is GoDaddy which seems to be a known issue with some browsers not recognizing it, not sure why.
 

Copperhead

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Just read JB's email response from John at RezKey. I firstly have to say how impressed I am that this inquiry was received AND reconciled ON A SUNDAY...wow! The issue is gone, through Safari I no longer get the security message.
It seems my browser did not have RezKey's SSL issuing company on its list of approved issuers. The issuer is GoDaddy which seems to be a known issue with some browsers not recognizing it, not sure why..
Rupert said:
Just read JB's email response from John at RezKey. I firstly have to say how impressed I am that this inquiry was received AND reconciled ON A SUNDAY...wow! The issue is gone, through Safari I no longer get the security message.
It seems my browser did not have RezKey's SSL issuing company on its list of approved issuers. The issuer is GoDaddy which seems to be a known issue with some browsers not recognizing it, not sure why.
I am equally impressed with the reply on a Sunday especially since there are currently problems with my booking system with NO service on the weekend! grrrrr!
I am still a little worried now with RezKey. You knew to come here, a real guest would not. Would they call the B&B? No they would move on. Did John state anywhere the rarity of this type of issue? Given the fact that this is such a small group and one has the issue, my initial thought is that it may be more common that I would like.
Any techies out there - sound off. I sure want this system to be the next one for me.
 

gillumhouse

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Just read JB's email response from John at RezKey. I firstly have to say how impressed I am that this inquiry was received AND reconciled ON A SUNDAY...wow! The issue is gone, through Safari I no longer get the security message.
It seems my browser did not have RezKey's SSL issuing company on its list of approved issuers. The issuer is GoDaddy which seems to be a known issue with some browsers not recognizing it, not sure why..
Rupert said:
Just read JB's email response from John at RezKey. I firstly have to say how impressed I am that this inquiry was received AND reconciled ON A SUNDAY...wow! The issue is gone, through Safari I no longer get the security message.
It seems my browser did not have RezKey's SSL issuing company on its list of approved issuers. The issuer is GoDaddy which seems to be a known issue with some browsers not recognizing it, not sure why.
I am equally impressed with the reply on a Sunday especially since there are currently problems with my booking system with NO service on the weekend! grrrrr!
I am still a little worried now with RezKey. You knew to come here, a real guest would not. Would they call the B&B? No they would move on. Did John state anywhere the rarity of this type of issue? Given the fact that this is such a small group and one has the issue, my initial thought is that it may be more common that I would like.
Any techies out there - sound off. I sure want this system to be the next one for me.
.
To me, the difference is this - we became aware of the problem and it was resolved VERY quickly. How long has the current problem with Weberv been goning on and is it not an even more pressing problem? Call your guet for the cc numbers when they have been told the numbers are secure?????
John & I were on a shared screen on Skype Friday night so he could see what I was seeing to understand the problem I was having. I was waiting for guests - big time difference - so it was around midnight my time. HE was getting ready to go camping. We worked through a few things and had a working "fix" for noe when my gusests arrived. Next morning I tried to make a rez, found it back to the original problem because of a line of code we had removed. Sent an e-mail expecting maybe Monday morning. SATURDAY MORNING he had it fixed to be workable. The glitch that needs to be fixed is very minor. All this to say, customer service and response to problems is superb.
 

Don Draper

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For those interested in the full technie explanation, this is the answer that John at RezKey gave:
Thanks for passing this on to me. I have researched the issue and found what I think should fix it. It turns out that some browsers (especially slightly older versions) don't have our SSL issuing company on their list of approved issuers. The trick is to add another certificate to our server which identifies the SSL certificate as approved. I have now done this and believe the warning should no longer show. I am unable to test it though as all of my browsers do not show the warning. I just downloaded Safari 5 and it did not show any warning there either (I usually use Chrome, Firefox, or IE). If you can test this new setting by going to our site with Safari it would be great to know if this fixed the warning.

Below is some information about this issue i found online. thanks,

John

SSL certificates are commonly known to secure a channel of communications, such as the web and email. The problem when installing GoDaddy SSL certificates on a server is Firefox may prompt you stating that the certificate is from an "Unauthorized Authority".

Why is GoDaddy an unauthorized authority on SSL certificates? Bloggit has a good definition over on his blog, as well as a resolution for stunnel and apache systems. But, we are using IIS so things change a bit for us. The bottom-line is a simple quote from his blog post:

In practice, while Opera and Internet Explorer come [installed] knowing about GoDaddy [as an authorized authority], Firefox and Thunderbird do not. And therefore presumably several other devices also don't. They gripe that GoDaddy is an "Unknown Authority"...
rather than silently accepting it.

To better describe what is happening, think of how an SSL certificate gets authorized by your browser. I am going to take a stab on how I think it works (feel free to correct me in the comments). The browser receives the header information for the SSL certificate upon the first communication to the web server. Within the header of this request is the complete information and public key of the SSL certificate information. But also included in the SSL certificate header information is the reference chain of the issuer, which is GoDaddy (or whomever issued your SSL certificate). If the client's browser does not have GoDaddy listed as a known and authorized issuer of SSL certificates (i.e. Firefox and Thunderbird do not, but IE7 does), the browser will prompt the user of the Unknown Authority. So the fix is to add a known issuer of SSL certificates that is "linked" to GoDaddy's (better known as Intermediate Certificates) at the server level.
 

Copperhead

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For those interested in the full technie explanation, this is the answer that John at RezKey gave:
Thanks for passing this on to me. I have researched the issue and found what I think should fix it. It turns out that some browsers (especially slightly older versions) don't have our SSL issuing company on their list of approved issuers. The trick is to add another certificate to our server which identifies the SSL certificate as approved. I have now done this and believe the warning should no longer show. I am unable to test it though as all of my browsers do not show the warning. I just downloaded Safari 5 and it did not show any warning there either (I usually use Chrome, Firefox, or IE). If you can test this new setting by going to our site with Safari it would be great to know if this fixed the warning.

Below is some information about this issue i found online. thanks,

John

SSL certificates are commonly known to secure a channel of communications, such as the web and email. The problem when installing GoDaddy SSL certificates on a server is Firefox may prompt you stating that the certificate is from an "Unauthorized Authority".

Why is GoDaddy an unauthorized authority on SSL certificates? Bloggit has a good definition over on his blog, as well as a resolution for stunnel and apache systems. But, we are using IIS so things change a bit for us. The bottom-line is a simple quote from his blog post:

In practice, while Opera and Internet Explorer come [installed] knowing about GoDaddy [as an authorized authority], Firefox and Thunderbird do not. And therefore presumably several other devices also don't. They gripe that GoDaddy is an "Unknown Authority"...
rather than silently accepting it.

To better describe what is happening, think of how an SSL certificate gets authorized by your browser. I am going to take a stab on how I think it works (feel free to correct me in the comments). The browser receives the header information for the SSL certificate upon the first communication to the web server. Within the header of this request is the complete information and public key of the SSL certificate information. But also included in the SSL certificate header information is the reference chain of the issuer, which is GoDaddy (or whomever issued your SSL certificate). If the client's browser does not have GoDaddy listed as a known and authorized issuer of SSL certificates (i.e. Firefox and Thunderbird do not, but IE7 does), the browser will prompt the user of the Unknown Authority. So the fix is to add a known issuer of SSL certificates that is "linked" to GoDaddy's (better known as Intermediate Certificates) at the server level.
.
Thanks for posting the info. I was under the impression from the earlier post that it was something on YOUR end that had to be corrected, something that we know our potential guests would not bother with.
This is very impressive to have this type of service. From what I gather and dealt with prior to Webervations purchase by b&b.com, the previous owner was just as hands on as what I gather RezKey is now. I am optimistically hoping that he has enough staff (or will hire as need develops) to keep him from having burnout, while continuing the service he is currently providing.
 

EmptyNest

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For those interested in the full technie explanation, this is the answer that John at RezKey gave:
Thanks for passing this on to me. I have researched the issue and found what I think should fix it. It turns out that some browsers (especially slightly older versions) don't have our SSL issuing company on their list of approved issuers. The trick is to add another certificate to our server which identifies the SSL certificate as approved. I have now done this and believe the warning should no longer show. I am unable to test it though as all of my browsers do not show the warning. I just downloaded Safari 5 and it did not show any warning there either (I usually use Chrome, Firefox, or IE). If you can test this new setting by going to our site with Safari it would be great to know if this fixed the warning.

Below is some information about this issue i found online. thanks,

John

SSL certificates are commonly known to secure a channel of communications, such as the web and email. The problem when installing GoDaddy SSL certificates on a server is Firefox may prompt you stating that the certificate is from an "Unauthorized Authority".

Why is GoDaddy an unauthorized authority on SSL certificates? Bloggit has a good definition over on his blog, as well as a resolution for stunnel and apache systems. But, we are using IIS so things change a bit for us. The bottom-line is a simple quote from his blog post:

In practice, while Opera and Internet Explorer come [installed] knowing about GoDaddy [as an authorized authority], Firefox and Thunderbird do not. And therefore presumably several other devices also don't. They gripe that GoDaddy is an "Unknown Authority"...
rather than silently accepting it.

To better describe what is happening, think of how an SSL certificate gets authorized by your browser. I am going to take a stab on how I think it works (feel free to correct me in the comments). The browser receives the header information for the SSL certificate upon the first communication to the web server. Within the header of this request is the complete information and public key of the SSL certificate information. But also included in the SSL certificate header information is the reference chain of the issuer, which is GoDaddy (or whomever issued your SSL certificate). If the client's browser does not have GoDaddy listed as a known and authorized issuer of SSL certificates (i.e. Firefox and Thunderbird do not, but IE7 does), the browser will prompt the user of the Unknown Authority. So the fix is to add a known issuer of SSL certificates that is "linked" to GoDaddy's (better known as Intermediate Certificates) at the server level.
.
Thanks for posting the info. I was under the impression from the earlier post that it was something on YOUR end that had to be corrected, something that we know our potential guests would not bother with.
This is very impressive to have this type of service. From what I gather and dealt with prior to Webervations purchase by b&b.com, the previous owner was just as hands on as what I gather RezKey is now. I am optimistically hoping that he has enough staff (or will hire as need develops) to keep him from having burnout, while continuing the service he is currently providing.
.
Yes when I first started with web er va tions Willy was always back to me lickety split and so was Drew. Willy is now at Acorn last I heard and I don't know who is left at Web er. But yes, when starting out small service has to be GREAT...let's hope it will continue as they grow.
 

wendydk

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For those interested in the full technie explanation, this is the answer that John at RezKey gave:
Thanks for passing this on to me. I have researched the issue and found what I think should fix it. It turns out that some browsers (especially slightly older versions) don't have our SSL issuing company on their list of approved issuers. The trick is to add another certificate to our server which identifies the SSL certificate as approved. I have now done this and believe the warning should no longer show. I am unable to test it though as all of my browsers do not show the warning. I just downloaded Safari 5 and it did not show any warning there either (I usually use Chrome, Firefox, or IE). If you can test this new setting by going to our site with Safari it would be great to know if this fixed the warning.

Below is some information about this issue i found online. thanks,

John

SSL certificates are commonly known to secure a channel of communications, such as the web and email. The problem when installing GoDaddy SSL certificates on a server is Firefox may prompt you stating that the certificate is from an "Unauthorized Authority".

Why is GoDaddy an unauthorized authority on SSL certificates? Bloggit has a good definition over on his blog, as well as a resolution for stunnel and apache systems. But, we are using IIS so things change a bit for us. The bottom-line is a simple quote from his blog post:

In practice, while Opera and Internet Explorer come [installed] knowing about GoDaddy [as an authorized authority], Firefox and Thunderbird do not. And therefore presumably several other devices also don't. They gripe that GoDaddy is an "Unknown Authority"...
rather than silently accepting it.

To better describe what is happening, think of how an SSL certificate gets authorized by your browser. I am going to take a stab on how I think it works (feel free to correct me in the comments). The browser receives the header information for the SSL certificate upon the first communication to the web server. Within the header of this request is the complete information and public key of the SSL certificate information. But also included in the SSL certificate header information is the reference chain of the issuer, which is GoDaddy (or whomever issued your SSL certificate). If the client's browser does not have GoDaddy listed as a known and authorized issuer of SSL certificates (i.e. Firefox and Thunderbird do not, but IE7 does), the browser will prompt the user of the Unknown Authority. So the fix is to add a known issuer of SSL certificates that is "linked" to GoDaddy's (better known as Intermediate Certificates) at the server level.
.
Thanks for posting the info. I was under the impression from the earlier post that it was something on YOUR end that had to be corrected, something that we know our potential guests would not bother with.
This is very impressive to have this type of service. From what I gather and dealt with prior to Webervations purchase by b&b.com, the previous owner was just as hands on as what I gather RezKey is now. I am optimistically hoping that he has enough staff (or will hire as need develops) to keep him from having burnout, while continuing the service he is currently providing.
.
Yes when I first started with web er va tions Willy was always back to me lickety split and so was Drew. Willy is now at Acorn last I heard and I don't know who is left at Web er. But yes, when starting out small service has to be GREAT...let's hope it will continue as they grow.
.
catlady said:
Yes when I first started with web er va tions Willy was always back to me lickety split and so was Drew. Willy is now at Acorn last I heard and I don't know who is left at Web er. But yes, when starting out small service has to be GREAT...let's hope it will continue as they grow.
Adam Strickland has been my contact for both my Inn's account and for our County group account. I find him to be very quick to respond, and any problem or request I've had has been handled quickly and to my complete satisfaction.
 

Copperhead

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For those interested in the full technie explanation, this is the answer that John at RezKey gave:
Thanks for passing this on to me. I have researched the issue and found what I think should fix it. It turns out that some browsers (especially slightly older versions) don't have our SSL issuing company on their list of approved issuers. The trick is to add another certificate to our server which identifies the SSL certificate as approved. I have now done this and believe the warning should no longer show. I am unable to test it though as all of my browsers do not show the warning. I just downloaded Safari 5 and it did not show any warning there either (I usually use Chrome, Firefox, or IE). If you can test this new setting by going to our site with Safari it would be great to know if this fixed the warning.

Below is some information about this issue i found online. thanks,

John

SSL certificates are commonly known to secure a channel of communications, such as the web and email. The problem when installing GoDaddy SSL certificates on a server is Firefox may prompt you stating that the certificate is from an "Unauthorized Authority".

Why is GoDaddy an unauthorized authority on SSL certificates? Bloggit has a good definition over on his blog, as well as a resolution for stunnel and apache systems. But, we are using IIS so things change a bit for us. The bottom-line is a simple quote from his blog post:

In practice, while Opera and Internet Explorer come [installed] knowing about GoDaddy [as an authorized authority], Firefox and Thunderbird do not. And therefore presumably several other devices also don't. They gripe that GoDaddy is an "Unknown Authority"...
rather than silently accepting it.

To better describe what is happening, think of how an SSL certificate gets authorized by your browser. I am going to take a stab on how I think it works (feel free to correct me in the comments). The browser receives the header information for the SSL certificate upon the first communication to the web server. Within the header of this request is the complete information and public key of the SSL certificate information. But also included in the SSL certificate header information is the reference chain of the issuer, which is GoDaddy (or whomever issued your SSL certificate). If the client's browser does not have GoDaddy listed as a known and authorized issuer of SSL certificates (i.e. Firefox and Thunderbird do not, but IE7 does), the browser will prompt the user of the Unknown Authority. So the fix is to add a known issuer of SSL certificates that is "linked" to GoDaddy's (better known as Intermediate Certificates) at the server level.
.
Thanks for posting the info. I was under the impression from the earlier post that it was something on YOUR end that had to be corrected, something that we know our potential guests would not bother with.
This is very impressive to have this type of service. From what I gather and dealt with prior to Webervations purchase by b&b.com, the previous owner was just as hands on as what I gather RezKey is now. I am optimistically hoping that he has enough staff (or will hire as need develops) to keep him from having burnout, while continuing the service he is currently providing.
.
Yes when I first started with web er va tions Willy was always back to me lickety split and so was Drew. Willy is now at Acorn last I heard and I don't know who is left at Web er. But yes, when starting out small service has to be GREAT...let's hope it will continue as they grow.
.
catlady said:
Yes when I first started with web er va tions Willy was always back to me lickety split and so was Drew. Willy is now at Acorn last I heard and I don't know who is left at Web er. But yes, when starting out small service has to be GREAT...let's hope it will continue as they grow.
Adam Strickland has been my contact for both my Inn's account and for our County group account. I find him to be very quick to respond, and any problem or request I've had has been handled quickly and to my complete satisfaction.
.
LB wrote: Adam Strickland has been my contact for both my Inn's account and for our County group account. I find him to be very quick to respond, and any problem or request I've had has been handled quickly and to my complete satisfaction.
He has for me as well. But not on the weekend during a major problem with their system.... That is not service! I am all for giving slack to them at first when a major problem takes place, and I do know they were there in the office all last weekend dealing the issues.
But given the issues had not been resolved, they should have a contact 24/7 until it is, someone on call. And they should also have someone (at least part time) on call every weekend anyway. This is when we do the most of our business and need access to our data. This was known by the previous owner, but b&b.com is doing with Webervations how they have been handling their directory, with much disregard to the needs of their customers.
 

JBloggs

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Be careful on this forum what you call a problem, and what is not a problem. We tend to over emphasize every little thing and snowball it into a problem. If you don't understand something it is better to go to the source or ask specifically what the impact is on your end as a user and the guest end.
As you know well enough, stuff can be tossed around here to smithereens.
Case in point, by not revealing a policy and discussing it without telling anyone what it is, is almost futile here, it sends people off on all sorts of goose chases. If you have a question, try to be specific (I am referring to another thread) as our imaginations can certainly at times run wild. :)
 

Sunshine

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Sorry Rupert! I've been away from the form, as I had a full house and then some over the weekend! Glad the problem is fixed!
 

Proud Texan

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Switch to Firefox on the Mac. It's a far superior browser.
 
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