Quantcast

special needs

INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources

Help Support INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources:

seashanty

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
5,693
Reaction score
11
the past few nites we've had a guest with parkinson's.
two couples, they stayed here in 2006. they came back because they remembered the first floor guestroom, easy access to the breakfast room and library, and a tiny step into the house from the porch.
what they did not remember is the bank or steps to climb up and then the walk across the lawn ... not even a walkway ... before reaching the porch. she struggled so much with the walker to get in the building! at one point, they asked if they could drive their car up the embankment. son and i decided this was a bad idea ... what if the car got stuck? plus the septic tanks are under the lawn. we were willing to help carry her if need be, but she vetoed that idea.
long story short ... she has mostly stayed here, venturing out only to dinner while the other couple has gone to the lighthouse and to the docks and things. she has a motorized chair thing at home but they did not bring it along. we have had a few guests who negotiated the property with one.
they did not want the chambermaid to fluff their room while here. i am hoping the bathroom sink held because last visit she used it to support herself and pulled it loose from the wall. i have a booster seat on the toilet to help getting up and down, but oh dear. no arm things on the sides of the toilet and it's a standard tub/shower.
she has not complained ... and i'm not either. i just am reminded of obstacles here when someone stays who has mobility issues.
~m*
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,272
Reaction score
134
Us, too, last night with heavy man with one bad leg. Only wanted to use front door to come and go. Left it unlocked last night after we locked up. Nice enough guests but tough going in an old house with floors that go every which way.
 

Sunshine

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2008
Messages
1,124
Reaction score
0
Good discussion. I have often wondered if I should post on my website: "not handicapped accessable." I have a couple of bridge clubs that come here for lunch and then to play bridge afterwards. some of those dear folks move very cautiously. I actually have a set of three cement stairs to go up to my sidewalk and then a set of 4 steps to the house. We only have two rooms that we make available to guests, so we don't have to be "handicap accessable."
We had one sweet lady bring her sister inlaw in a wheel chair (she got a day pass from the nursing home). the dear lady was in her 80's andvery frail her self. She has been here several times, so she knew about the stairs. How she thought she was going to get that wheel chair and her sister in law up all those stairs is beyond me! Fortunately my husband was home that day and helped "carry" the wheel chair (with the woman in it) up and into the house and back afterwards! I did tell the woman who brought her that I really enjoyed having her sister in law here, but that we are not handicap accessable and we were fortunate to have my husband here for help. As gently as I could, I explained that she could not bring her back again.
I think handicap issues are a great topic that we can all benefit from discussing.
So, would you... or do any of you have anything on your web site that states you are not handicap accessable. I do have posted that all my rooms are on the second floor.
 

EmptyNest

Well-known member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
8,741
Reaction score
1
Good discussion. I have often wondered if I should post on my website: "not handicapped accessable." I have a couple of bridge clubs that come here for lunch and then to play bridge afterwards. some of those dear folks move very cautiously. I actually have a set of three cement stairs to go up to my sidewalk and then a set of 4 steps to the house. We only have two rooms that we make available to guests, so we don't have to be "handicap accessable."
We had one sweet lady bring her sister inlaw in a wheel chair (she got a day pass from the nursing home). the dear lady was in her 80's andvery frail her self. She has been here several times, so she knew about the stairs. How she thought she was going to get that wheel chair and her sister in law up all those stairs is beyond me! Fortunately my husband was home that day and helped "carry" the wheel chair (with the woman in it) up and into the house and back afterwards! I did tell the woman who brought her that I really enjoyed having her sister in law here, but that we are not handicap accessable and we were fortunate to have my husband here for help. As gently as I could, I explained that she could not bring her back again.
I think handicap issues are a great topic that we can all benefit from discussing.
So, would you... or do any of you have anything on your web site that states you are not handicap accessable. I do have posted that all my rooms are on the second floor..
As I talk with guests, sometimes special requirements come up and if I am not able to handle them, I will tell them and discourage them from booking. We have lots of steps. So if y ou are the same..maybe a not about NOT being handicap accessible is a good idea. OR, make it very clear how many stairs there are, how far a walk from parking lot etc,
 

gillumhouse

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Supporting Member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
15,518
Reaction score
78
Good discussion. I have often wondered if I should post on my website: "not handicapped accessable." I have a couple of bridge clubs that come here for lunch and then to play bridge afterwards. some of those dear folks move very cautiously. I actually have a set of three cement stairs to go up to my sidewalk and then a set of 4 steps to the house. We only have two rooms that we make available to guests, so we don't have to be "handicap accessable."
We had one sweet lady bring her sister inlaw in a wheel chair (she got a day pass from the nursing home). the dear lady was in her 80's andvery frail her self. She has been here several times, so she knew about the stairs. How she thought she was going to get that wheel chair and her sister in law up all those stairs is beyond me! Fortunately my husband was home that day and helped "carry" the wheel chair (with the woman in it) up and into the house and back afterwards! I did tell the woman who brought her that I really enjoyed having her sister in law here, but that we are not handicap accessable and we were fortunate to have my husband here for help. As gently as I could, I explained that she could not bring her back again.
I think handicap issues are a great topic that we can all benefit from discussing.
So, would you... or do any of you have anything on your web site that states you are not handicap accessable. I do have posted that all my rooms are on the second floor..
Having a DH who is mobility handicap I am familiar with the problems. I post on the web site that all guestrooms are on the second floor. DH used to be able to pull himself up the stairs with the railing but after his 6-way bypass last year must go up (the very rare times he HAS to) on his butt, step by step. I have had folks who once they are up, they are up for the night and those that (like me) do the one-step to get up & down.
A strong railing helps a lot of people who just need that extra pull or balancer. Handicap means many things so I do not say I am not handicap accessible - hearing is in that category also and I have smoke alarms that have a light that comes on if they go off.
I had a pair of 2-tons a couple years ago. I struggled to keep my eyes from bugging out when I opened the door, (I swear there was between 750 and 800 pounds between them!) Iwas grateful they were going to be in the queen bed (each would have taken up a double by themselves) that was already wired together to hold the slats in place. I was hoping that everything would hold and it did. Whew!!
 

swirt

Forum founder. Former Owner.
Joined
May 17, 2008
Messages
3,210
Reaction score
0
Good discussion. I have often wondered if I should post on my website: "not handicapped accessable." I have a couple of bridge clubs that come here for lunch and then to play bridge afterwards. some of those dear folks move very cautiously. I actually have a set of three cement stairs to go up to my sidewalk and then a set of 4 steps to the house. We only have two rooms that we make available to guests, so we don't have to be "handicap accessable."
We had one sweet lady bring her sister inlaw in a wheel chair (she got a day pass from the nursing home). the dear lady was in her 80's andvery frail her self. She has been here several times, so she knew about the stairs. How she thought she was going to get that wheel chair and her sister in law up all those stairs is beyond me! Fortunately my husband was home that day and helped "carry" the wheel chair (with the woman in it) up and into the house and back afterwards! I did tell the woman who brought her that I really enjoyed having her sister in law here, but that we are not handicap accessable and we were fortunate to have my husband here for help. As gently as I could, I explained that she could not bring her back again.
I think handicap issues are a great topic that we can all benefit from discussing.
So, would you... or do any of you have anything on your web site that states you are not handicap accessable. I do have posted that all my rooms are on the second floor..
DIsabilities (handicaps) come in a variety of forms. I wouldn't say "not handicap accessible" as that rules out all disabilities. What you have described is a lack of wheelchair accessibility, so I would say something like "not wheelchair accessible."
 

Sunshine

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2008
Messages
1,124
Reaction score
0
Good discussion. I have often wondered if I should post on my website: "not handicapped accessable." I have a couple of bridge clubs that come here for lunch and then to play bridge afterwards. some of those dear folks move very cautiously. I actually have a set of three cement stairs to go up to my sidewalk and then a set of 4 steps to the house. We only have two rooms that we make available to guests, so we don't have to be "handicap accessable."
We had one sweet lady bring her sister inlaw in a wheel chair (she got a day pass from the nursing home). the dear lady was in her 80's andvery frail her self. She has been here several times, so she knew about the stairs. How she thought she was going to get that wheel chair and her sister in law up all those stairs is beyond me! Fortunately my husband was home that day and helped "carry" the wheel chair (with the woman in it) up and into the house and back afterwards! I did tell the woman who brought her that I really enjoyed having her sister in law here, but that we are not handicap accessable and we were fortunate to have my husband here for help. As gently as I could, I explained that she could not bring her back again.
I think handicap issues are a great topic that we can all benefit from discussing.
So, would you... or do any of you have anything on your web site that states you are not handicap accessable. I do have posted that all my rooms are on the second floor..
DIsabilities (handicaps) come in a variety of forms. I wouldn't say "not handicap accessible" as that rules out all disabilities. What you have described is a lack of wheelchair accessibility, so I would say something like "not wheelchair accessible."
.
Yes, thats good advice. some of the others have said similar things.
thanks for the advice all.
 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

Well-known member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
3,893
Reaction score
0
Good discussion. I have often wondered if I should post on my website: "not handicapped accessable." I have a couple of bridge clubs that come here for lunch and then to play bridge afterwards. some of those dear folks move very cautiously. I actually have a set of three cement stairs to go up to my sidewalk and then a set of 4 steps to the house. We only have two rooms that we make available to guests, so we don't have to be "handicap accessable."
We had one sweet lady bring her sister inlaw in a wheel chair (she got a day pass from the nursing home). the dear lady was in her 80's andvery frail her self. She has been here several times, so she knew about the stairs. How she thought she was going to get that wheel chair and her sister in law up all those stairs is beyond me! Fortunately my husband was home that day and helped "carry" the wheel chair (with the woman in it) up and into the house and back afterwards! I did tell the woman who brought her that I really enjoyed having her sister in law here, but that we are not handicap accessable and we were fortunate to have my husband here for help. As gently as I could, I explained that she could not bring her back again.
I think handicap issues are a great topic that we can all benefit from discussing.
So, would you... or do any of you have anything on your web site that states you are not handicap accessable. I do have posted that all my rooms are on the second floor..
high street victorian said:
Good discussion. I have often wondered if I should post on my website: "not handicapped accessable." I have a couple of bridge clubs that come here for lunch and then to play bridge afterwards. some of those dear folks move very cautiously. I actually have a set of three cement stairs to go up to my sidewalk and then a set of 4 steps to the house. We only have two rooms that we make available to guests, so we don't have to be "handicap accessable."
We had one sweet lady bring her sister inlaw in a wheel chair (she got a day pass from the nursing home). the dear lady was in her 80's andvery frail her self. She has been here several times, so she knew about the stairs. How she thought she was going to get that wheel chair and her sister in law up all those stairs is beyond me! Fortunately my husband was home that day and helped "carry" the wheel chair (with the woman in it) up and into the house and back afterwards! I did tell the woman who brought her that I really enjoyed having her sister in law here, but that we are not handicap accessable and we were fortunate to have my husband here for help. As gently as I could, I explained that she could not bring her back again.
I think handicap issues are a great topic that we can all benefit from discussing.
So, would you... or do any of you have anything on your web site that states you are not handicap accessable. I do have posted that all my rooms are on the second floor.
You are doing it. All rooms are located on second floor. That is it, like yourself I often say "Do guests actually think a kitchen is on the 2nd floor of an old Victorian?" We have had guests SHOCKED that their room was upstairs, altho I have it clearly stated.
I would steer clear of any comments on disabilities or handicaps for the public to read. Unless YOU ARE handicap accessable of course.
 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

Well-known member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
3,893
Reaction score
0
Good discussion. I have often wondered if I should post on my website: "not handicapped accessable." I have a couple of bridge clubs that come here for lunch and then to play bridge afterwards. some of those dear folks move very cautiously. I actually have a set of three cement stairs to go up to my sidewalk and then a set of 4 steps to the house. We only have two rooms that we make available to guests, so we don't have to be "handicap accessable."
We had one sweet lady bring her sister inlaw in a wheel chair (she got a day pass from the nursing home). the dear lady was in her 80's andvery frail her self. She has been here several times, so she knew about the stairs. How she thought she was going to get that wheel chair and her sister in law up all those stairs is beyond me! Fortunately my husband was home that day and helped "carry" the wheel chair (with the woman in it) up and into the house and back afterwards! I did tell the woman who brought her that I really enjoyed having her sister in law here, but that we are not handicap accessable and we were fortunate to have my husband here for help. As gently as I could, I explained that she could not bring her back again.
I think handicap issues are a great topic that we can all benefit from discussing.
So, would you... or do any of you have anything on your web site that states you are not handicap accessable. I do have posted that all my rooms are on the second floor..
DIsabilities (handicaps) come in a variety of forms. I wouldn't say "not handicap accessible" as that rules out all disabilities. What you have described is a lack of wheelchair accessibility, so I would say something like "not wheelchair accessible."
.
Yes, thats good advice. some of the others have said similar things.
thanks for the advice all.
.
high street victorian said:
Yes, thats good advice. some of the others have said similar things.
thanks for the advice all.
For you local elderly folks there for luncheons, we had the same here they expected to use OUR bathroom and come in to OUR kitchen. NOPE. same goes for them, stairs, steps, etc.
Also, we had ONE PERSON pay for the luncheon and the rest of the nickle and dimers can pay HER. I had a few and had all sorts of things happen. The # of people agree upon was also what this key person paid for, in case someone didn't show. We bought the food and it is not our problem.
 
Top