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Tests Show Most Store Honey Isn't Honey

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gillumhouse

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Thank you for this article. I now feel better aboiut paying what I pay for honey - because it is from a local bekeeper. There was a disease a couple years that was killing off bees and hives. It killed off my original honey supple but I have found another locally. It is worth the cost to know it is good honey.
 

toddburme

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I had no idea. It is amazing what we do in this country to save a buck sometimes.
 

Joey Camb

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Its why I have a local suppier (can see my bees in person if I choose) its a huge big thing to shop local right now. PLus I would rather support people to whom my money makes a difference than the big wallmarts to whom it makes no difference and they don't give a monkeys.
 

Madeleine

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Honey from the farmers mkt here. My guess is the store stuff doesn't 'keep' as well (forever) like honey with pollen in it. I need a different dispenser now to showcase the 'real' deal.
 

seashanty

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i didn't have a chance to read the whole article yet, but i buy really raw honey. or from a local beekeeper. i think it's the propolis in the honey that has all the really good stuff in it ... remember the cosmetics royal jelly from honey?
anyway the honey i like, the raw honey, also has honeycomb and a few bits of pollen in it.
but some guests did not appreciate it at all ... and it is expensive. so i went with a local beekeeper so i knew where the honey came from ... his honey was strained but not filtered, like the guests expected. i am trying to remember if there was a problem with honey from sick bees a while back, somewhere. and there was/is honey that is a mixture of honey and corn syrup!
some guests went nuts over the local honey (i kept the really raw for me) it was sort of like maple syrup with the guests. some were content with artificial, others were ecstatic for real syrup ... and were surprised that maine had its own maple syrup, not just vermont.
 

Madeleine

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i didn't have a chance to read the whole article yet, but i buy really raw honey. or from a local beekeeper. i think it's the propolis in the honey that has all the really good stuff in it ... remember the cosmetics royal jelly from honey?
anyway the honey i like, the raw honey, also has honeycomb and a few bits of pollen in it.
but some guests did not appreciate it at all ... and it is expensive. so i went with a local beekeeper so i knew where the honey came from ... his honey was strained but not filtered, like the guests expected. i am trying to remember if there was a problem with honey from sick bees a while back, somewhere. and there was/is honey that is a mixture of honey and corn syrup!
some guests went nuts over the local honey (i kept the really raw for me) it was sort of like maple syrup with the guests. some were content with artificial, others were ecstatic for real syrup ... and were surprised that maine had its own maple syrup, not just vermont..
I just explained to guests that the honey they were using was 'real' and not from the grocery store in spite of the ubiquitous honey bear container.
 

Red Handed Jill

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i didn't have a chance to read the whole article yet, but i buy really raw honey. or from a local beekeeper. i think it's the propolis in the honey that has all the really good stuff in it ... remember the cosmetics royal jelly from honey?
anyway the honey i like, the raw honey, also has honeycomb and a few bits of pollen in it.
but some guests did not appreciate it at all ... and it is expensive. so i went with a local beekeeper so i knew where the honey came from ... his honey was strained but not filtered, like the guests expected. i am trying to remember if there was a problem with honey from sick bees a while back, somewhere. and there was/is honey that is a mixture of honey and corn syrup!
some guests went nuts over the local honey (i kept the really raw for me) it was sort of like maple syrup with the guests. some were content with artificial, others were ecstatic for real syrup ... and were surprised that maine had its own maple syrup, not just vermont..
seashanty said:
anyway the honey i like, the raw honey, also has honeycomb and a few bits of pollen in it.
That stuff is incredible...quite possibly the most delicious stuff I've ever tasted, and I'm much more of a coffee than candy type gal. Sweet, but rich and with a crazy depth and complexity...And you're right. I'm sure if I set it out (after raising rates to cover the cost!), the guests would just point out that something was wrong with it LOL
 

Generic

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Essentially, from my understanding, they are removing the pollen from it, so you can't really tell that it's honey anymore. They claim it is because people like clear honey. I wonder if it's more because they can sell the pollen seperately and make money from it.
 
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