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ceecee

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Not sure how I would word this request........but am worried it will happen again.
"Please do not use the hair dryer to de-fog your ocean view picture window. The glass is 93 yrs old, elegantly etched, and it will break."
After this, I installed wall mount hairdryers only! They cannot reach the large glass windows.
 

Joey Camb

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"Using the TV
Switch on the power at the wall.............."
You wouldn't believe the number of people who used to come down and say "The TV in our room doesn't work" or "The TV is dead". After one incident where I went upstairs into their room, flicked the switch next to the plug and the guest said "Well it didn't tell us we had to do that in the intructions!!!".........well now it does..
We were always having to remind ourselves to turn on the switch for the plug for our water kettle in our hotel room in England. That's not really usual here in the States...to have switches for appliances. I think maybe you have more switches for appliances and such in the UK? Is this an additional safety thing?
.
in answer to that one I don't know but what I do know is that all plug sockets in the UK have switches as standard they are sold that way. The biggest laugh I had was when I was rung down by a lady to ask for an extension cable. Why? because there arn't any plugs for my hair dryer in the bathroom so I want a flex that reached. I pointed out that it is illegal in this country to have plug sockets in the bathroom as it is a different voltage to the USA and it will kill you. Please use the plug socket on the dressing table that is what it is for. Some people qualify for the darwin awards in a serious way. She hadn't considered for a second that there was a very good reason for this.
 

Highlands John

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"Using the TV
Switch on the power at the wall.............."
You wouldn't believe the number of people who used to come down and say "The TV in our room doesn't work" or "The TV is dead". After one incident where I went upstairs into their room, flicked the switch next to the plug and the guest said "Well it didn't tell us we had to do that in the intructions!!!".........well now it does..
We were always having to remind ourselves to turn on the switch for the plug for our water kettle in our hotel room in England. That's not really usual here in the States...to have switches for appliances. I think maybe you have more switches for appliances and such in the UK? Is this an additional safety thing?
.
in answer to that one I don't know but what I do know is that all plug sockets in the UK have switches as standard they are sold that way. The biggest laugh I had was when I was rung down by a lady to ask for an extension cable. Why? because there arn't any plugs for my hair dryer in the bathroom so I want a flex that reached. I pointed out that it is illegal in this country to have plug sockets in the bathroom as it is a different voltage to the USA and it will kill you. Please use the plug socket on the dressing table that is what it is for. Some people qualify for the darwin awards in a serious way. She hadn't considered for a second that there was a very good reason for this.
.
I turn the TVs off at the wall as we are a green concious business so don't leave TVs on standby. It's been estimated that if everyone in the UK stopped leaving their TVs on standby all the time, the UK could switch off a whole power-station.
I would have thought that if the TV is dead common sense would dictate that the first thing to do is check the power connection. The plug with switch is clearly visible, I've even put a label on them saying "TV".
 

JBloggs

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"Using the TV
Switch on the power at the wall.............."
You wouldn't believe the number of people who used to come down and say "The TV in our room doesn't work" or "The TV is dead". After one incident where I went upstairs into their room, flicked the switch next to the plug and the guest said "Well it didn't tell us we had to do that in the intructions!!!".........well now it does..
We were always having to remind ourselves to turn on the switch for the plug for our water kettle in our hotel room in England. That's not really usual here in the States...to have switches for appliances. I think maybe you have more switches for appliances and such in the UK? Is this an additional safety thing?
.
in answer to that one I don't know but what I do know is that all plug sockets in the UK have switches as standard they are sold that way. The biggest laugh I had was when I was rung down by a lady to ask for an extension cable. Why? because there arn't any plugs for my hair dryer in the bathroom so I want a flex that reached. I pointed out that it is illegal in this country to have plug sockets in the bathroom as it is a different voltage to the USA and it will kill you. Please use the plug socket on the dressing table that is what it is for. Some people qualify for the darwin awards in a serious way. She hadn't considered for a second that there was a very good reason for this.
.
I turn the TVs off at the wall as we are a green concious business so don't leave TVs on standby. It's been estimated that if everyone in the UK stopped leaving their TVs on standby all the time, the UK could switch off a whole power-station.
I would have thought that if the TV is dead common sense would dictate that the first thing to do is check the power connection. The plug with switch is clearly visible, I've even put a label on them saying "TV".
.
Highlands John said:
I turn the TVs off at the wall as we are a green concious business so don't leave TVs on standby. It's been estimated that if everyone in the UK stopped leaving their TVs on standby all the time, the UK could switch off a whole power-station.
I would have thought that if the TV is dead common sense would dictate that the first thing to do is check the power connection. The plug with switch is clearly visible, I've even put a label on them saying "TV".
That reminds me of my favorite show "The IT Crowd" Phone rings "Have you tried turning it on and off...have you checked the power at the wall"
FYI the new tv's are not on standby all the time and are super energy efficient, in fact a 52-55" LCD costs only $29 per year to operate. (Just in case anyone was wondering, you can get one and SAVE more than you spend in a year by buying one)
 

Arks

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"Using the TV
Switch on the power at the wall.............."
You wouldn't believe the number of people who used to come down and say "The TV in our room doesn't work" or "The TV is dead". After one incident where I went upstairs into their room, flicked the switch next to the plug and the guest said "Well it didn't tell us we had to do that in the intructions!!!".........well now it does..
We were always having to remind ourselves to turn on the switch for the plug for our water kettle in our hotel room in England. That's not really usual here in the States...to have switches for appliances. I think maybe you have more switches for appliances and such in the UK? Is this an additional safety thing?
.
in answer to that one I don't know but what I do know is that all plug sockets in the UK have switches as standard they are sold that way. The biggest laugh I had was when I was rung down by a lady to ask for an extension cable. Why? because there arn't any plugs for my hair dryer in the bathroom so I want a flex that reached. I pointed out that it is illegal in this country to have plug sockets in the bathroom as it is a different voltage to the USA and it will kill you. Please use the plug socket on the dressing table that is what it is for. Some people qualify for the darwin awards in a serious way. She hadn't considered for a second that there was a very good reason for this.
.
I also noticed that in UK the switch for the bathroom light is generally located outside the bathroom, and when you can turn on a light from within the bathroom, it's usually done by pulling a string (I guess because electricity can't travel through the string). I assume all this is to prevent wet hands dripping into a 240V light switch.
I did notice that most of those string pulls were brown from oily hands pulling them for years. Didn't look that great.
 

Samster

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"Using the TV
Switch on the power at the wall.............."
You wouldn't believe the number of people who used to come down and say "The TV in our room doesn't work" or "The TV is dead". After one incident where I went upstairs into their room, flicked the switch next to the plug and the guest said "Well it didn't tell us we had to do that in the intructions!!!".........well now it does..
We were always having to remind ourselves to turn on the switch for the plug for our water kettle in our hotel room in England. That's not really usual here in the States...to have switches for appliances. I think maybe you have more switches for appliances and such in the UK? Is this an additional safety thing?
.
in answer to that one I don't know but what I do know is that all plug sockets in the UK have switches as standard they are sold that way. The biggest laugh I had was when I was rung down by a lady to ask for an extension cable. Why? because there arn't any plugs for my hair dryer in the bathroom so I want a flex that reached. I pointed out that it is illegal in this country to have plug sockets in the bathroom as it is a different voltage to the USA and it will kill you. Please use the plug socket on the dressing table that is what it is for. Some people qualify for the darwin awards in a serious way. She hadn't considered for a second that there was a very good reason for this.
.
Yes, I think that your switch requirement there is different because of the voltage!!! I sometimes think that travelers from the States aren't really clued into that electricity difference....they just think that the plug configurations are different, for some odd reason. haha! And that's the only reason that they need an adaptor. We need our hairdryers!!

 

Samster

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Location
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"Using the TV
Switch on the power at the wall.............."
You wouldn't believe the number of people who used to come down and say "The TV in our room doesn't work" or "The TV is dead". After one incident where I went upstairs into their room, flicked the switch next to the plug and the guest said "Well it didn't tell us we had to do that in the intructions!!!".........well now it does..
We were always having to remind ourselves to turn on the switch for the plug for our water kettle in our hotel room in England. That's not really usual here in the States...to have switches for appliances. I think maybe you have more switches for appliances and such in the UK? Is this an additional safety thing?
.
in answer to that one I don't know but what I do know is that all plug sockets in the UK have switches as standard they are sold that way. The biggest laugh I had was when I was rung down by a lady to ask for an extension cable. Why? because there arn't any plugs for my hair dryer in the bathroom so I want a flex that reached. I pointed out that it is illegal in this country to have plug sockets in the bathroom as it is a different voltage to the USA and it will kill you. Please use the plug socket on the dressing table that is what it is for. Some people qualify for the darwin awards in a serious way. She hadn't considered for a second that there was a very good reason for this.
.
I turn the TVs off at the wall as we are a green concious business so don't leave TVs on standby. It's been estimated that if everyone in the UK stopped leaving their TVs on standby all the time, the UK could switch off a whole power-station.
I would have thought that if the TV is dead common sense would dictate that the first thing to do is check the power connection. The plug with switch is clearly visible, I've even put a label on them saying "TV".
.
Highlands John said:
I turn the TVs off at the wall as we are a green concious business so don't leave TVs on standby. It's been estimated that if everyone in the UK stopped leaving their TVs on standby all the time, the UK could switch off a whole power-station.
I would have thought that if the TV is dead common sense would dictate that the first thing to do is check the power connection. The plug with switch is clearly visible, I've even put a label on them saying "TV".
That reminds me of my favorite show "The IT Crowd" Phone rings "Have you tried turning it on and off...have you checked the power at the wall"
FYI the new tv's are not on standby all the time and are super energy efficient, in fact a 52-55" LCD costs only $29 per year to operate. (Just in case anyone was wondering, you can get one and SAVE more than you spend in a year by buying one)
.
Side track alert....I'm trying to convince my dh that this line of thinking is the entire reason for replacing our 15 year old TV in our den. But alas, it's not working. He is holding out for the OLED TVs.
 

Copperhead

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"Using the TV
Switch on the power at the wall.............."
You wouldn't believe the number of people who used to come down and say "The TV in our room doesn't work" or "The TV is dead". After one incident where I went upstairs into their room, flicked the switch next to the plug and the guest said "Well it didn't tell us we had to do that in the intructions!!!".........well now it does..
We were always having to remind ourselves to turn on the switch for the plug for our water kettle in our hotel room in England. That's not really usual here in the States...to have switches for appliances. I think maybe you have more switches for appliances and such in the UK? Is this an additional safety thing?
.
in answer to that one I don't know but what I do know is that all plug sockets in the UK have switches as standard they are sold that way. The biggest laugh I had was when I was rung down by a lady to ask for an extension cable. Why? because there arn't any plugs for my hair dryer in the bathroom so I want a flex that reached. I pointed out that it is illegal in this country to have plug sockets in the bathroom as it is a different voltage to the USA and it will kill you. Please use the plug socket on the dressing table that is what it is for. Some people qualify for the darwin awards in a serious way. She hadn't considered for a second that there was a very good reason for this.
.
I turn the TVs off at the wall as we are a green concious business so don't leave TVs on standby. It's been estimated that if everyone in the UK stopped leaving their TVs on standby all the time, the UK could switch off a whole power-station.
I would have thought that if the TV is dead common sense would dictate that the first thing to do is check the power connection. The plug with switch is clearly visible, I've even put a label on them saying "TV".
.
Highlands John said:
I turn the TVs off at the wall as we are a green concious business so don't leave TVs on standby. It's been estimated that if everyone in the UK stopped leaving their TVs on standby all the time, the UK could switch off a whole power-station.
I would have thought that if the TV is dead common sense would dictate that the first thing to do is check the power connection. The plug with switch is clearly visible, I've even put a label on them saying "TV".
That reminds me of my favorite show "The IT Crowd" Phone rings "Have you tried turning it on and off...have you checked the power at the wall"
FYI the new tv's are not on standby all the time and are super energy efficient, in fact a 52-55" LCD costs only $29 per year to operate. (Just in case anyone was wondering, you can get one and SAVE more than you spend in a year by buying one)
.
Side track alert....I'm trying to convince my dh that this line of thinking is the entire reason for replacing our 15 year old TV in our den. But alas, it's not working. He is holding out for the OLED TVs.
.
Samster said:
Side track alert....I'm trying to convince my dh that this line of thinking is the entire reason for replacing our 15 year old TV in our den. But alas, it's not working. He is holding out for the OLED TVs.
As with all appliances, DH says he wants to wait until the final invention. lol
 
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