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JerseyBoy

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I received a copy of new sanitization protocols from the state of NJ for hotels. I am wondering if any other NJ inns received this and if so, does this apply to inns? In particular there is one section which stipulates any occupied guest room must be cleaned, sanitized, and have towels and sheets changed each day.

We have adopted a policy of minimal guestroom interaction during a guests stay unless they request us to come in and clean or change sheets and towels. It appears this new policy would require us to do this even if the guest does not want it. Anyone have any thoughts. Below is the link to the new protocols.
 

Morticia

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Sounds like the opposite of what you want to do. I’m not going into any guest rooms on a daily basis. Yikes!
 

Arks

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All hotels, as defined by N.J.S.A. 55:13A-3(j), in the State are hereby directed to
adopt and implement written policies that cover the following...


COVER the following. Doesn't say your policy must match the following. It says you have to adopt and implement a written policy that covers the info.
  • It doesn't say you have to DO the things on the list.
  • It says your policy must "cover" those things. It doesn't say your policy must adhere to those things.
Certainly there's no reason you'd need to sanitize the room daily if the same people are still in there. That's ridiculous! What would be the point in risking your health for no reason whatsoever? They just haven't thought this through.
 

JerseyBoy

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I agree. It seems ridiculous and adding risk, not removing it.
 

Scooter

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All hotels, as defined by N.J.S.A. 55:13A-3(j), in the State are hereby directed to
adopt and implement written policies that cover the following...


COVER the following. Doesn't say your policy must match the following. It says you have to adopt and implement a written policy that covers the info.
  • It doesn't say you have to DO the things on the list.
  • It says your policy must "cover" those things. It doesn't say your policy must adhere to those things.
Certainly there's no reason you'd need to sanitize the room daily if the same people are still in there. That's ridiculous! What would be the point in risking your health for no reason whatsoever? They just haven't thought this through.
 

Scooter

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Totally Asinine as it’s another reason I’m glad I am no longer a resident of that State!
 

An Old Tavernkeeper

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We do not enter guest rooms or change any sheets or towels during their stay unless they request it by hanging the Maid Service Requested hanger on the door knob. About 2/3 of guests have gone back to requesting daily maid service. BUT to spray sanitizer all over the room each day and change out everything is mass hysteria and stupidity. The only change we have made is eliminating all of our 'green cleaning' products and replacing them with Clorox and Lysol type harsh cleaners.
 

woodertea

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So, I developed a CT inactivation spreadsheet for demonstrating compliance with the LT2ESWTR using UV for the state of NC, but we never adopted it because we didn't want to be the first state to do so. I also worked with the first system to use ozone for for demonstrating inactivation of viruses.

Remember that NJ was the first state in the nation to use chlorine for disinfection because they knew they were drawing drinking water from a source that was known to be contaminated with bacteria. So, this does not strike me as over zealous. To comply with this rule, I would use something like this:

Do not overuse it. Air out the room after each use...and that smell that smells like it just rained...is ozone. The reason its important to remember is from a safety perspective. You know that slippery feeling when you rub bleach between your fingers? Its not bleach, but your skin basically melting. Similar thing is happening in your nose if you sniff too much ozone. Hope this isn't too much info to be taken to opposite poles. Just set the thing on 30 minutes, walk out and come back an hour later. Everything is sanitized. Air out. Repeat for the next one.
 

ramonalea

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So, I developed a CT inactivation spreadsheet for demonstrating compliance with the LT2ESWTR using UV for the state of NC, but we never adopted it because we didn't want to be the first state to do so. I also worked with the first system to use ozone for for demonstrating inactivation of viruses.

Remember that NJ was the first state in the nation to use chlorine for disinfection because they knew they were drawing drinking water from a source that was known to be contaminated with bacteria. So, this does not strike me as over zealous. To comply with this rule, I would use something like this:

Do not overuse it. Air out the room after each use...and that smell that smells like it just rained...is ozone. The reason its important to remember is from a safety perspective. You know that slippery feeling when you rub bleach between your fingers? Its not bleach, but your skin basically melting. Similar thing is happening in your nose if you sniff too much ozone. Hope this isn't too much info to be taken to opposite poles. Just set the thing on 30 minutes, walk out and come back an hour later. Everything is sanitized. Air out. Repeat for the next one.
Ozone gives me a headache if ran over an hour.
 

woodertea

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If you inhale ozone, you're doing it wrong. If you use ozone and you're getting headaches from the byproducts created, you have bigger problems. Ozone is not a topic for casual audiences. If you do not have a firm understanding of it, you should just walk away...I'll speak no more on the topic..
 
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