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Morticia

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Just had guests pull up, unload luggage and try to get into room withour checking-in. They 'assumed' they could just walk into their room unannounced. Luckily, the door was locked or who knows when we would have found out they were here!
 

Arks

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There's your next perk to add to the amenities list.
I think Hertz has something like this. Bypass the counter. Just go pick a car, get in and drive off. Not sure how they work that, but they do advertise it.
 

Morticia

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There's your next perk to add to the amenities list.
I think Hertz has something like this. Bypass the counter. Just go pick a car, get in and drive off. Not sure how they work that, but they do advertise it..
We do self-check-in but you have to let us know you want that. If you show up during the daytime, we're here so we do the whole check-in show.
It's pretty easy...we run the card and leave you the info outside on how to get inside. If your credit card doesn't work, you don't get in.
 

Morticia

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Too weird...would that happen at a hotel? NOT!.
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked! We go the other way...we lock the outside door to avoid this sort of thing.
Remember waaaaaaay back when we used to leave the door unlocked and the keys on the desk so we would know who was here and guests used to just take the keys and go to their rooms without telling us they were here?
I know a place that does that...the innkeepers leave whenever they feel like it (they don't live there) and they leave the extra, unrented room keys in the mailbox. If you call for a room, they tell you to take a key out of the box and pick out your room and let them know which room you picked. (It works for them.)
 

Arks

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Too weird...would that happen at a hotel? NOT!.
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked! We go the other way...we lock the outside door to avoid this sort of thing.
Remember waaaaaaay back when we used to leave the door unlocked and the keys on the desk so we would know who was here and guests used to just take the keys and go to their rooms without telling us they were here?
I know a place that does that...the innkeepers leave whenever they feel like it (they don't live there) and they leave the extra, unrented room keys in the mailbox. If you call for a room, they tell you to take a key out of the box and pick out your room and let them know which room you picked. (It works for them.)
.
Morticia said:
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked!
I've been thinking about this. Doors in most hotels have self-closing hinges and the door self-locks. I can see advantages. Security for the guest in the room since the room's always locked, and security for the guest's stuff since they don't have to remember to manually lock the room when they leave.
Of course, it also makes sure someone can't walk in off the street and help themselves to a room for the night without paying.
But surely a lot of guests end up locking themselves out of the room, with all the headaches that causes.
Do most B&B owners have self-locking bedroom doors, or does the guest have to use a key to lock it when they go out?
 

Morticia

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Too weird...would that happen at a hotel? NOT!.
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked! We go the other way...we lock the outside door to avoid this sort of thing.
Remember waaaaaaay back when we used to leave the door unlocked and the keys on the desk so we would know who was here and guests used to just take the keys and go to their rooms without telling us they were here?
I know a place that does that...the innkeepers leave whenever they feel like it (they don't live there) and they leave the extra, unrented room keys in the mailbox. If you call for a room, they tell you to take a key out of the box and pick out your room and let them know which room you picked. (It works for them.)
.
Morticia said:
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked!
I've been thinking about this. Doors in most hotels have self-closing hinges and the door self-locks. I can see advantages. Security for the guest in the room since the room's always locked, and security for the guest's stuff since they don't have to remember to manually lock the room when they leave.
Of course, it also makes sure someone can't walk in off the street and help themselves to a room for the night without paying.
But surely a lot of guests end up locking themselves out of the room, with all the headaches that causes.
Do most B&B owners have self-locking bedroom doors, or does the guest have to use a key to lock it when they go out?
.
I think you will find that many B&B's do not have locks on the doors at all, except a chain style for the guest to barricade themselves in at night.
It's rare, but we do get guests who wake us up because they can't figure out the lock on their room door. Mostly, tho, it's at breakfast where one guest came down first and the other guest locks the door assuming the first guest has the key. That's the most 'locked out' we usually get here...at breakfast.
 

wendydk

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Too weird...would that happen at a hotel? NOT!.
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked! We go the other way...we lock the outside door to avoid this sort of thing.
Remember waaaaaaay back when we used to leave the door unlocked and the keys on the desk so we would know who was here and guests used to just take the keys and go to their rooms without telling us they were here?
I know a place that does that...the innkeepers leave whenever they feel like it (they don't live there) and they leave the extra, unrented room keys in the mailbox. If you call for a room, they tell you to take a key out of the box and pick out your room and let them know which room you picked. (It works for them.)
.
Morticia said:
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked!
I've been thinking about this. Doors in most hotels have self-closing hinges and the door self-locks. I can see advantages. Security for the guest in the room since the room's always locked, and security for the guest's stuff since they don't have to remember to manually lock the room when they leave.
Of course, it also makes sure someone can't walk in off the street and help themselves to a room for the night without paying.
But surely a lot of guests end up locking themselves out of the room, with all the headaches that causes.
Do most B&B owners have self-locking bedroom doors, or does the guest have to use a key to lock it when they go out?
.
Arkansawyer said:
Do most B&B owners have self-locking bedroom doors, or does the guest have to use a key to lock it when they go out?
Deadbolt lock for their door, and a locked front door, they have a key for each. Many guests don't lock their room doors at all.
 

Arks

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Too weird...would that happen at a hotel? NOT!.
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked! We go the other way...we lock the outside door to avoid this sort of thing.
Remember waaaaaaay back when we used to leave the door unlocked and the keys on the desk so we would know who was here and guests used to just take the keys and go to their rooms without telling us they were here?
I know a place that does that...the innkeepers leave whenever they feel like it (they don't live there) and they leave the extra, unrented room keys in the mailbox. If you call for a room, they tell you to take a key out of the box and pick out your room and let them know which room you picked. (It works for them.)
.
Morticia said:
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked!
I've been thinking about this. Doors in most hotels have self-closing hinges and the door self-locks. I can see advantages. Security for the guest in the room since the room's always locked, and security for the guest's stuff since they don't have to remember to manually lock the room when they leave.
Of course, it also makes sure someone can't walk in off the street and help themselves to a room for the night without paying.
But surely a lot of guests end up locking themselves out of the room, with all the headaches that causes.
Do most B&B owners have self-locking bedroom doors, or does the guest have to use a key to lock it when they go out?
.
Seems like some people would complain about having to leave their laptops and possessions in unlocked rooms when they're out, for fear of other guests in the house taking stuff. Not that other guests are at all likely to take something, of course, but I'd think a lot of people would worry about that, and some would complain.
I myself might worry about children and teenagers of guests going in other people's rooms. They aren't always as trustworthy as the adults.
Obviously not a problem, though, or you would have solved it.
I'd mention that I've never seen rooms without locks in Europe, but I'm getting the message that y'all are tired of hearing about European ways!

 

gillumhouse

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Too weird...would that happen at a hotel? NOT!.
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked! We go the other way...we lock the outside door to avoid this sort of thing.
Remember waaaaaaay back when we used to leave the door unlocked and the keys on the desk so we would know who was here and guests used to just take the keys and go to their rooms without telling us they were here?
I know a place that does that...the innkeepers leave whenever they feel like it (they don't live there) and they leave the extra, unrented room keys in the mailbox. If you call for a room, they tell you to take a key out of the box and pick out your room and let them know which room you picked. (It works for them.)
.
Morticia said:
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked!
I've been thinking about this. Doors in most hotels have self-closing hinges and the door self-locks. I can see advantages. Security for the guest in the room since the room's always locked, and security for the guest's stuff since they don't have to remember to manually lock the room when they leave.
Of course, it also makes sure someone can't walk in off the street and help themselves to a room for the night without paying.
But surely a lot of guests end up locking themselves out of the room, with all the headaches that causes.
Do most B&B owners have self-locking bedroom doors, or does the guest have to use a key to lock it when they go out?
.
Seems like some people would complain about having to leave their laptops and possessions in unlocked rooms when they're out, for fear of other guests in the house taking stuff. Not that other guests are at all likely to take something, of course, but I'd think a lot of people would worry about that, and some would complain.
I myself might worry about children and teenagers of guests going in other people's rooms. They aren't always as trustworthy as the adults.
Obviously not a problem, though, or you would have solved it.
I'd mention that I've never seen rooms without locks in Europe, but I'm getting the message that y'all are tired of hearing about European ways!

.
I do not mind hearing about European ways - I might find something in it. However, I think most B & Bs have locks on the doors although I have toured some that did not (in mid-Ohio River area Ohio - I would never stay there myself however). We have a front door with skeleton key lock so our guestrooms have a key to the deadbolt lock on their door and a key to the kitchen door in case we are out. Many guests leave their doors open - which I do not like - and the guests from NY/NJ lock the door to come down to breakfast!
Self-locking doors are for hotels, they spoil the ambiance of a B & B IMO. Our shared bath has a deadbolt lock and I have the only keys to that. Our guests lock themselves out when they forget to return the bolt into the lock and then shut the door behind them with the keys on the dresser. No biggie - unless it is the bathroom door........at 3 a.m.
 

Arks

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Too weird...would that happen at a hotel? NOT!.
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked! We go the other way...we lock the outside door to avoid this sort of thing.
Remember waaaaaaay back when we used to leave the door unlocked and the keys on the desk so we would know who was here and guests used to just take the keys and go to their rooms without telling us they were here?
I know a place that does that...the innkeepers leave whenever they feel like it (they don't live there) and they leave the extra, unrented room keys in the mailbox. If you call for a room, they tell you to take a key out of the box and pick out your room and let them know which room you picked. (It works for them.)
.
Morticia said:
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked!
I've been thinking about this. Doors in most hotels have self-closing hinges and the door self-locks. I can see advantages. Security for the guest in the room since the room's always locked, and security for the guest's stuff since they don't have to remember to manually lock the room when they leave.
Of course, it also makes sure someone can't walk in off the street and help themselves to a room for the night without paying.
But surely a lot of guests end up locking themselves out of the room, with all the headaches that causes.
Do most B&B owners have self-locking bedroom doors, or does the guest have to use a key to lock it when they go out?
.
Seems like some people would complain about having to leave their laptops and possessions in unlocked rooms when they're out, for fear of other guests in the house taking stuff. Not that other guests are at all likely to take something, of course, but I'd think a lot of people would worry about that, and some would complain.
I myself might worry about children and teenagers of guests going in other people's rooms. They aren't always as trustworthy as the adults.
Obviously not a problem, though, or you would have solved it.
I'd mention that I've never seen rooms without locks in Europe, but I'm getting the message that y'all are tired of hearing about European ways!

.
I do not mind hearing about European ways - I might find something in it. However, I think most B & Bs have locks on the doors although I have toured some that did not (in mid-Ohio River area Ohio - I would never stay there myself however). We have a front door with skeleton key lock so our guestrooms have a key to the deadbolt lock on their door and a key to the kitchen door in case we are out. Many guests leave their doors open - which I do not like - and the guests from NY/NJ lock the door to come down to breakfast!
Self-locking doors are for hotels, they spoil the ambiance of a B & B IMO. Our shared bath has a deadbolt lock and I have the only keys to that. Our guests lock themselves out when they forget to return the bolt into the lock and then shut the door behind them with the keys on the dresser. No biggie - unless it is the bathroom door........at 3 a.m.
.
gillumhouse said:
Self-locking doors are for hotels, they spoil the ambiance of a B & B IMO.
I agree completely. Plus the locked-out-in-the-middle-of-the-night problem if they go down the hall to the ice machine without their key.
Which brings up another subject. I've hijacked this thread to ask about door locks. Now ice machines. Do any B&Bs have one out where guests can help themselves? I've never seen one in a B&B.
Since I've been given permission to mention Europe, on a hot day during our recent Britain vacation, my sister was dying for a drink of ice water when we arrived at our B&B. She asked the owner for some ice. The owner's mouth fell open like nobody had ever asked before, then she returned with a cup containing 2 ice cubes.
Those who haven't been there might be amazed at how they get ice in parts of Europe (including, apparently, this UK B&B). They buy them at the store in a sheet of what I'd describe as big bubble wrap. Each ice cube (about a dozen to the sheet) is enclosed its own plastic bubble. They press each precious cube out of it's pocket as they need one (and only one).
This photo is the closest I could find to them, but the ones I've seen are round and look more like bubble wrap than this blister pack:

 

gillumhouse

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Too weird...would that happen at a hotel? NOT!.
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked! We go the other way...we lock the outside door to avoid this sort of thing.
Remember waaaaaaay back when we used to leave the door unlocked and the keys on the desk so we would know who was here and guests used to just take the keys and go to their rooms without telling us they were here?
I know a place that does that...the innkeepers leave whenever they feel like it (they don't live there) and they leave the extra, unrented room keys in the mailbox. If you call for a room, they tell you to take a key out of the box and pick out your room and let them know which room you picked. (It works for them.)
.
Morticia said:
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked!
I've been thinking about this. Doors in most hotels have self-closing hinges and the door self-locks. I can see advantages. Security for the guest in the room since the room's always locked, and security for the guest's stuff since they don't have to remember to manually lock the room when they leave.
Of course, it also makes sure someone can't walk in off the street and help themselves to a room for the night without paying.
But surely a lot of guests end up locking themselves out of the room, with all the headaches that causes.
Do most B&B owners have self-locking bedroom doors, or does the guest have to use a key to lock it when they go out?
.
Seems like some people would complain about having to leave their laptops and possessions in unlocked rooms when they're out, for fear of other guests in the house taking stuff. Not that other guests are at all likely to take something, of course, but I'd think a lot of people would worry about that, and some would complain.
I myself might worry about children and teenagers of guests going in other people's rooms. They aren't always as trustworthy as the adults.
Obviously not a problem, though, or you would have solved it.
I'd mention that I've never seen rooms without locks in Europe, but I'm getting the message that y'all are tired of hearing about European ways!

.
I do not mind hearing about European ways - I might find something in it. However, I think most B & Bs have locks on the doors although I have toured some that did not (in mid-Ohio River area Ohio - I would never stay there myself however). We have a front door with skeleton key lock so our guestrooms have a key to the deadbolt lock on their door and a key to the kitchen door in case we are out. Many guests leave their doors open - which I do not like - and the guests from NY/NJ lock the door to come down to breakfast!
Self-locking doors are for hotels, they spoil the ambiance of a B & B IMO. Our shared bath has a deadbolt lock and I have the only keys to that. Our guests lock themselves out when they forget to return the bolt into the lock and then shut the door behind them with the keys on the dresser. No biggie - unless it is the bathroom door........at 3 a.m.
.
gillumhouse said:
Self-locking doors are for hotels, they spoil the ambiance of a B & B IMO.
I agree completely. Plus the locked-out-in-the-middle-of-the-night problem if they go down the hall to the ice machine without their key.
Which brings up another subject. I've hijacked this thread to ask about door locks. Now ice machines. Do any B&Bs have one out where guests can help themselves? I've never seen one in a B&B.
Since I've been given permission to mention Europe, on a hot day during our recent Britain vacation, my sister was dying for a drink of ice water when we arrived at our B&B. She asked the owner for some ice. The owner's mouth fell open like nobody had ever asked before, then she returned with a cup containing 2 ice cubes.
Those who haven't been there might be amazed at how they get ice in parts of Europe (including, apparently, this UK B&B). They buy them at the store in a sheet of what I'd describe as big bubble wrap. Each ice cube (about a dozen to the sheet) is enclosed its own plastic bubble. They press each precious cube out of it's pocket as they need one (and only one).
This photo is the closest I could find to them, but the ones I've seen are round and look more like bubble wrap than this blister pack:

.
Do any B&Bs have one out where guests can help themselves?
Yes, several inn-mates have ice making machines in the beverage area for their guests.
So here is one up for us - we give ice like it is going out of style! Score 1.
 

Joey Camb

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We are very rarely asked for Ice but I keep 2 trays prepped in the freezer just in case (top tip for getting dents out of your carpet is to pop an icecube on it and leave to melt (ie from furniture) I toy now and again with buying a fridge that dispenses ice but to be honest not much demand. We do have a drinks dispenser on the front of the fridge that dispenses cold water for any guests that want it. I think people don't ask as it is not perceived as part of the service of a B&B. Now and again I also toy with buying those small fridges with glass doors and putting them in the larger rooms with soft drinks in (water coke sprite etc) for guest to help them selves as part of the price. This was brought home to me as some ladies needed super early breakfast and I couldn't help (5.30AM) but if there were fridges in the room I could give them milk and cerial and bowls etc and they could sort them selves out.
 

Morticia

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Too weird...would that happen at a hotel? NOT!.
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked! We go the other way...we lock the outside door to avoid this sort of thing.
Remember waaaaaaay back when we used to leave the door unlocked and the keys on the desk so we would know who was here and guests used to just take the keys and go to their rooms without telling us they were here?
I know a place that does that...the innkeepers leave whenever they feel like it (they don't live there) and they leave the extra, unrented room keys in the mailbox. If you call for a room, they tell you to take a key out of the box and pick out your room and let them know which room you picked. (It works for them.)
.
Morticia said:
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked!
I've been thinking about this. Doors in most hotels have self-closing hinges and the door self-locks. I can see advantages. Security for the guest in the room since the room's always locked, and security for the guest's stuff since they don't have to remember to manually lock the room when they leave.
Of course, it also makes sure someone can't walk in off the street and help themselves to a room for the night without paying.
But surely a lot of guests end up locking themselves out of the room, with all the headaches that causes.
Do most B&B owners have self-locking bedroom doors, or does the guest have to use a key to lock it when they go out?
.
Seems like some people would complain about having to leave their laptops and possessions in unlocked rooms when they're out, for fear of other guests in the house taking stuff. Not that other guests are at all likely to take something, of course, but I'd think a lot of people would worry about that, and some would complain.
I myself might worry about children and teenagers of guests going in other people's rooms. They aren't always as trustworthy as the adults.
Obviously not a problem, though, or you would have solved it.
I'd mention that I've never seen rooms without locks in Europe, but I'm getting the message that y'all are tired of hearing about European ways!

.
I do not mind hearing about European ways - I might find something in it. However, I think most B & Bs have locks on the doors although I have toured some that did not (in mid-Ohio River area Ohio - I would never stay there myself however). We have a front door with skeleton key lock so our guestrooms have a key to the deadbolt lock on their door and a key to the kitchen door in case we are out. Many guests leave their doors open - which I do not like - and the guests from NY/NJ lock the door to come down to breakfast!
Self-locking doors are for hotels, they spoil the ambiance of a B & B IMO. Our shared bath has a deadbolt lock and I have the only keys to that. Our guests lock themselves out when they forget to return the bolt into the lock and then shut the door behind them with the keys on the dresser. No biggie - unless it is the bathroom door........at 3 a.m.
.
gillumhouse said:
Self-locking doors are for hotels, they spoil the ambiance of a B & B IMO.
I agree completely. Plus the locked-out-in-the-middle-of-the-night problem if they go down the hall to the ice machine without their key.
Which brings up another subject. I've hijacked this thread to ask about door locks. Now ice machines. Do any B&Bs have one out where guests can help themselves? I've never seen one in a B&B.
Since I've been given permission to mention Europe, on a hot day during our recent Britain vacation, my sister was dying for a drink of ice water when we arrived at our B&B. She asked the owner for some ice. The owner's mouth fell open like nobody had ever asked before, then she returned with a cup containing 2 ice cubes.
Those who haven't been there might be amazed at how they get ice in parts of Europe (including, apparently, this UK B&B). They buy them at the store in a sheet of what I'd describe as big bubble wrap. Each ice cube (about a dozen to the sheet) is enclosed its own plastic bubble. They press each precious cube out of it's pocket as they need one (and only one).
This photo is the closest I could find to them, but the ones I've seen are round and look more like bubble wrap than this blister pack:

.
We have a guest fridge with freezer, so ice cubes are always avail to guests. Some B&B's on here have an ice machine in a convenient location for guests- table top model.
 

Morticia

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We are very rarely asked for Ice but I keep 2 trays prepped in the freezer just in case (top tip for getting dents out of your carpet is to pop an icecube on it and leave to melt (ie from furniture) I toy now and again with buying a fridge that dispenses ice but to be honest not much demand. We do have a drinks dispenser on the front of the fridge that dispenses cold water for any guests that want it. I think people don't ask as it is not perceived as part of the service of a B&B. Now and again I also toy with buying those small fridges with glass doors and putting them in the larger rooms with soft drinks in (water coke sprite etc) for guest to help them selves as part of the price. This was brought home to me as some ladies needed super early breakfast and I couldn't help (5.30AM) but if there were fridges in the room I could give them milk and cerial and bowls etc and they could sort them selves out..
We have one small 'dorm-sized' fridge where we keep milk for guests, and they can use it to store whatever (usually meds & freezer packs and (perish the thought) beer.) I would say 90% of our UK guests help themselves to cereal every morning BEFORE we serve them breakfast! I'll scrounge up a pic and show youwhat I have set up.
 

muirford

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We have a dorm-size refrigerator (unstocked), a water dispenser (room temperature), and a countertop ice maker available in the guest library. Water carafes, glasses and small ice buckets are in each room. The ice maker doesn't need a water source - you fill it and it continually remakes the ice from the water that melts into the reservoir. One of the best $200 we ever spent.
 

Arks

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Too weird...would that happen at a hotel? NOT!.
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked! We go the other way...we lock the outside door to avoid this sort of thing.
Remember waaaaaaay back when we used to leave the door unlocked and the keys on the desk so we would know who was here and guests used to just take the keys and go to their rooms without telling us they were here?
I know a place that does that...the innkeepers leave whenever they feel like it (they don't live there) and they leave the extra, unrented room keys in the mailbox. If you call for a room, they tell you to take a key out of the box and pick out your room and let them know which room you picked. (It works for them.)
.
Morticia said:
Yeah, but the reason it wouldn't happen is all the hotel room doors are locked!
I've been thinking about this. Doors in most hotels have self-closing hinges and the door self-locks. I can see advantages. Security for the guest in the room since the room's always locked, and security for the guest's stuff since they don't have to remember to manually lock the room when they leave.
Of course, it also makes sure someone can't walk in off the street and help themselves to a room for the night without paying.
But surely a lot of guests end up locking themselves out of the room, with all the headaches that causes.
Do most B&B owners have self-locking bedroom doors, or does the guest have to use a key to lock it when they go out?
.
Seems like some people would complain about having to leave their laptops and possessions in unlocked rooms when they're out, for fear of other guests in the house taking stuff. Not that other guests are at all likely to take something, of course, but I'd think a lot of people would worry about that, and some would complain.
I myself might worry about children and teenagers of guests going in other people's rooms. They aren't always as trustworthy as the adults.
Obviously not a problem, though, or you would have solved it.
I'd mention that I've never seen rooms without locks in Europe, but I'm getting the message that y'all are tired of hearing about European ways!

.
I do not mind hearing about European ways - I might find something in it. However, I think most B & Bs have locks on the doors although I have toured some that did not (in mid-Ohio River area Ohio - I would never stay there myself however). We have a front door with skeleton key lock so our guestrooms have a key to the deadbolt lock on their door and a key to the kitchen door in case we are out. Many guests leave their doors open - which I do not like - and the guests from NY/NJ lock the door to come down to breakfast!
Self-locking doors are for hotels, they spoil the ambiance of a B & B IMO. Our shared bath has a deadbolt lock and I have the only keys to that. Our guests lock themselves out when they forget to return the bolt into the lock and then shut the door behind them with the keys on the dresser. No biggie - unless it is the bathroom door........at 3 a.m.
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gillumhouse said:
Self-locking doors are for hotels, they spoil the ambiance of a B & B IMO.
I agree completely. Plus the locked-out-in-the-middle-of-the-night problem if they go down the hall to the ice machine without their key.
Which brings up another subject. I've hijacked this thread to ask about door locks. Now ice machines. Do any B&Bs have one out where guests can help themselves? I've never seen one in a B&B.
Since I've been given permission to mention Europe, on a hot day during our recent Britain vacation, my sister was dying for a drink of ice water when we arrived at our B&B. She asked the owner for some ice. The owner's mouth fell open like nobody had ever asked before, then she returned with a cup containing 2 ice cubes.
Those who haven't been there might be amazed at how they get ice in parts of Europe (including, apparently, this UK B&B). They buy them at the store in a sheet of what I'd describe as big bubble wrap. Each ice cube (about a dozen to the sheet) is enclosed its own plastic bubble. They press each precious cube out of it's pocket as they need one (and only one).
This photo is the closest I could find to them, but the ones I've seen are round and look more like bubble wrap than this blister pack:

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Do any B&Bs have one out where guests can help themselves?
Yes, several inn-mates have ice making machines in the beverage area for their guests.
So here is one up for us - we give ice like it is going out of style! Score 1.
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Nope. For something as important as ice, you score 10, not 1!
Europeans have no idea how much money they'd make by just setting up little ice stands in areas where American tourists are staying. On hot days over there I'd easily pay $10 for a small bag of ice!
It doesn't matter that the Europeans don't get the deal with Americans and ice. It is what it is. Just like I don't get them eating pork 'n beans with breakfast in the British Isles, but when they come to America I'd be happy to provide them to British tourists for the right price
. I guarantee you, it will delight your British guests to offer some pork 'n beans with their breakfast eggs, especially if they've been over here a while and haven't seen any at breakfast.
 

Don Draper

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We have a dorm-size refrigerator (unstocked), a water dispenser (room temperature), and a countertop ice maker available in the guest library. Water carafes, glasses and small ice buckets are in each room. The ice maker doesn't need a water source - you fill it and it continually remakes the ice from the water that melts into the reservoir. One of the best $200 we ever spent..
Jeanne recommended her ice machine to us and it has been the single greatest addition we've made in 4 years, I seriously LOVE IT! It's easy to keep ice in all the time, guests love being able to help themselves and I don't have to answer the bell every time they need ice for a cocktail. We also just replaced our water cooler, we got a Whirlpool digital machine at Lowe's for only $150 and it heats water to 198 and cools it to 41, it's quiet and working really well so far.
One last new addition for this summer, we bought those little packets of drink mix that are meant to go in a 16 oz bottle of water. The kind we got are the Arnold Palmer 50/50 iced tea/lemonade. They have been a HUGE hit, and much easier than trying to stay stocked with soft drinks, or making big batches of iced tea that were never finished.
 

Arks

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We have a dorm-size refrigerator (unstocked), a water dispenser (room temperature), and a countertop ice maker available in the guest library. Water carafes, glasses and small ice buckets are in each room. The ice maker doesn't need a water source - you fill it and it continually remakes the ice from the water that melts into the reservoir. One of the best $200 we ever spent..
The ice maker doesn't need a water source - you fill it and it continually remakes the ice from the water that melts into the reservoir. One of the best $200 we ever spent.Interesting. Can you give a brand name?
 
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