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Understanding Egg Labels 101

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Kay Nein

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We were so excited to find a local woman who would sell us eggs for the Inn. I have been wanting to use as much local produce & such as possible. However, as soon as we struck an agreement over price, frequency & delivery, she calls me back and said that she found out that she can't sell to "restaurants". I never thought about her needing to be inspected, certified, blessed, whatever... such a shame!
 

JBloggs

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We were so excited to find a local woman who would sell us eggs for the Inn. I have been wanting to use as much local produce & such as possible. However, as soon as we struck an agreement over price, frequency & delivery, she calls me back and said that she found out that she can't sell to "restaurants". I never thought about her needing to be inspected, certified, blessed, whatever... such a shame!.
Dena said:
We were so excited to find a local woman who would sell us eggs for the Inn. I have been wanting to use as much local produce & such as possible. However, as soon as we struck an agreement over price, frequency & delivery, she calls me back and said that she found out that she can't sell to "restaurants". I never thought about her needing to be inspected, certified, blessed, whatever... such a shame!
Yep, that is an issue. I had encountered that on the forum when I mentioned it and was told they are not inspected and approved and the funny part was I was buying them from a man who worked (works) for the USDA! He thought it was absurd.
But you aren't a restaurant, are you? You can buy them from someone else then!
 

EmptyNest

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We were so excited to find a local woman who would sell us eggs for the Inn. I have been wanting to use as much local produce & such as possible. However, as soon as we struck an agreement over price, frequency & delivery, she calls me back and said that she found out that she can't sell to "restaurants". I never thought about her needing to be inspected, certified, blessed, whatever... such a shame!.
I like to buy local as much as any one else. But when I did, I found them to be inferior to what I could get elsewhere so I choose more carefully now and am not unfortunately buying as much local as I used to. If they don't care about their quality control, then they aren't getting my business.
 

Madeleine

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We were so excited to find a local woman who would sell us eggs for the Inn. I have been wanting to use as much local produce & such as possible. However, as soon as we struck an agreement over price, frequency & delivery, she calls me back and said that she found out that she can't sell to "restaurants". I never thought about her needing to be inspected, certified, blessed, whatever... such a shame!.
The premise, I believe, is that you can contaminate yourself but not the guests. So, farmers markets are out unless the person selling has been inspected.
 

egoodell

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We get our eggs locally either from a lady at my workplace or the farmers market. They taste so much better than those from the store.
I personally would trust a local egg before a grocery store egg. They have recalls on a regular basis for food so often.
Riki
 

JBloggs

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We get our eggs locally either from a lady at my workplace or the farmers market. They taste so much better than those from the store.
I personally would trust a local egg before a grocery store egg. They have recalls on a regular basis for food so often.
Riki.
egoodell said:
We get our eggs locally either from a lady at my workplace or the farmers market. They taste so much better than those from the store.
I personally would trust a local egg before a grocery store egg. They have recalls on a regular basis for food so often.
Riki
a local person with a family who feeds their chooks and collects and sells a few eggs, vs those disgusting henneries (sp?) with diseased and dead caged animals half the time. Oh yeah, I am with ya!
 

Breakfast Diva

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We're considering buying some chicks to start having our own eggs. Our neighbor across the road has a hen house with no hens and in talks with him he's willing to keep the hens if we buy the feed. Of course he can have eggs too, but as a single guy, that's not many eggs!
Do any of you have your own chickens? Do you have to inform your b&b insurance carrier that you're providing home grown eggs?
 

egoodell

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We're considering buying some chicks to start having our own eggs. Our neighbor across the road has a hen house with no hens and in talks with him he's willing to keep the hens if we buy the feed. Of course he can have eggs too, but as a single guy, that's not many eggs!
Do any of you have your own chickens? Do you have to inform your b&b insurance carrier that you're providing home grown eggs?.
We plan to have our own as soon as I can quit my day job soon. I don't think we have any special regs - there is another B&B in the area that lets the guests go out and collect the eggs and cook their own breakfast - more of what I would consider a "home stay".
RIki
 

Joey Camb

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round here we have several egg people who are certified and have free range hens (you can go and see them if you like) yokes are amazing huge and yellow.
 

Arks

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We have about a dozen hens. I can tell you the egg output is way below the feed consumption. So they cost us more than they save us. They're in a large pen (about 40 ft. x 40 ft.) which they have completely denuded of any vegetation. We can't let them out in the yard or the dogs would do them in. Plus when they ARE out, they scratch up all the landscaping.
In summer we rake up grass clippings for them, but most of the year they live on chicken feed and table scraps. The eggs are tasty (only for our family) but they only produce well for a few months of the year, and production drops off as the hens get older.
It's a nice hobby if you have spare time, but they're not cheap and not trouble-free. Also, when the wind's blowing the right direction from the chicken pen, there's a little odor involved.
Anybody want to buy a dozen hens? I've about talked myself into getting rid of them!
 

Breakfast Diva

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We have about a dozen hens. I can tell you the egg output is way below the feed consumption. So they cost us more than they save us. They're in a large pen (about 40 ft. x 40 ft.) which they have completely denuded of any vegetation. We can't let them out in the yard or the dogs would do them in. Plus when they ARE out, they scratch up all the landscaping.
In summer we rake up grass clippings for them, but most of the year they live on chicken feed and table scraps. The eggs are tasty (only for our family) but they only produce well for a few months of the year, and production drops off as the hens get older.
It's a nice hobby if you have spare time, but they're not cheap and not trouble-free. Also, when the wind's blowing the right direction from the chicken pen, there's a little odor involved.
Anybody want to buy a dozen hens? I've about talked myself into getting rid of them!.
The great thing about our situation is that all we have to do is buy the chics and the feed and he'll take care of them. I just had a long conversation with him and we're going to go for it. We'll get 8 Rhode Island Reds on April 4th. We're not doing it to save money, but I think it'll be great to at least suppliment our store bought supply with these fresh ones and it fits our rural b&b brand and eco-friendly marketing. A few dozen fresh eggs a week would be wonderful!
 

egoodell

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We have about a dozen hens. I can tell you the egg output is way below the feed consumption. So they cost us more than they save us. They're in a large pen (about 40 ft. x 40 ft.) which they have completely denuded of any vegetation. We can't let them out in the yard or the dogs would do them in. Plus when they ARE out, they scratch up all the landscaping.
In summer we rake up grass clippings for them, but most of the year they live on chicken feed and table scraps. The eggs are tasty (only for our family) but they only produce well for a few months of the year, and production drops off as the hens get older.
It's a nice hobby if you have spare time, but they're not cheap and not trouble-free. Also, when the wind's blowing the right direction from the chicken pen, there's a little odor involved.
Anybody want to buy a dozen hens? I've about talked myself into getting rid of them!.
Ours will roam during the day - they eat bugs - so great to get rid of ticks and such. My brother in law has them and their dogs know to leave them alone.
I pay $3 - $4 per dozen farm fresh here - will have to see about what the cost feeding is.
We would like to have them just because we like animals too...but DH will have to build a great coop off the ground to keep the foxes away. I like the ones that were designed in England that look like they are on a giant wheelbarrow off the ground so that you can move them around.
Would be great to have them in the vineyard to dine on the Japanese beetles when they come around...
RIki
 

Penelope

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We have about a dozen hens. I can tell you the egg output is way below the feed consumption. So they cost us more than they save us. They're in a large pen (about 40 ft. x 40 ft.) which they have completely denuded of any vegetation. We can't let them out in the yard or the dogs would do them in. Plus when they ARE out, they scratch up all the landscaping.
In summer we rake up grass clippings for them, but most of the year they live on chicken feed and table scraps. The eggs are tasty (only for our family) but they only produce well for a few months of the year, and production drops off as the hens get older.
It's a nice hobby if you have spare time, but they're not cheap and not trouble-free. Also, when the wind's blowing the right direction from the chicken pen, there's a little odor involved.
Anybody want to buy a dozen hens? I've about talked myself into getting rid of them!.
The great thing about our situation is that all we have to do is buy the chics and the feed and he'll take care of them. I just had a long conversation with him and we're going to go for it. We'll get 8 Rhode Island Reds on April 4th. We're not doing it to save money, but I think it'll be great to at least suppliment our store bought supply with these fresh ones and it fits our rural b&b brand and eco-friendly marketing. A few dozen fresh eggs a week would be wonderful!
.
Breakfast Diva said:
The great thing about our situation is that all we have to do is buy the chics and the feed and he'll take care of them. I just had a long conversation with him and we're going to go for it. We'll get 8 Rhode Island Reds on April 4th.
RI Reds are a great choice! I raised them for years. I also added in a few Barred Rocks here and there. Last year, I found a breed called Golden Buffs or Golden Comets- they are amazing. Slightly smaller bird, but more uniform egg size. And early producer. The RI Reds and Barred Rocks usually were 20-24 weeks to maturity for me. These new ones were 15-17. Steady egg layers all thru the winter and so mild tempered! We have one who has adopted us. Whenever we are outside, she runs up to us and will walk alongside us. She loves it when we are out splitting firewood- even with the wood splitter going. She scavenges for grubs and worms and goodies from under the logs we are splitting!
 

Penelope

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We have about a dozen hens. I can tell you the egg output is way below the feed consumption. So they cost us more than they save us. They're in a large pen (about 40 ft. x 40 ft.) which they have completely denuded of any vegetation. We can't let them out in the yard or the dogs would do them in. Plus when they ARE out, they scratch up all the landscaping.
In summer we rake up grass clippings for them, but most of the year they live on chicken feed and table scraps. The eggs are tasty (only for our family) but they only produce well for a few months of the year, and production drops off as the hens get older.
It's a nice hobby if you have spare time, but they're not cheap and not trouble-free. Also, when the wind's blowing the right direction from the chicken pen, there's a little odor involved.
Anybody want to buy a dozen hens? I've about talked myself into getting rid of them!.
Ours will roam during the day - they eat bugs - so great to get rid of ticks and such. My brother in law has them and their dogs know to leave them alone.
I pay $3 - $4 per dozen farm fresh here - will have to see about what the cost feeding is.
We would like to have them just because we like animals too...but DH will have to build a great coop off the ground to keep the foxes away. I like the ones that were designed in England that look like they are on a giant wheelbarrow off the ground so that you can move them around.
Would be great to have them in the vineyard to dine on the Japanese beetles when they come around...
RIki
.
egoodell said:
Would be great to have them in the vineyard to dine on the Japanese beetles when they come around...
RIki
I've never found them to like the beetles, but they will eat the grubs before they become the beetles :)
 

Arks

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Our chickens are scared to death of insects. When we catch a grasshopper or something and pitch it in pen, the chickens run as far away as they can get, and stay there!
They would be great though as a miniature version of agritourism, to let city folk feel like they're really on a farm. There are a lot of interesting chickens available with amazing feathering and coloring.
It took us years to perfect a pen that the preditors can't get into. Wire buried deep into the ground so they can't dig under, chicken wire on top so they can't come in from above. Still have occasional problems with black snakes getting eggs.
 

JBloggs

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You need a rooster to encourage them to lay, but not everyone likes fertilized eggs, plus a heat lamp in winter to keep them popping them out. We never had an overabundance and that was BEFORE owning a B&B. You might need a whole barnyard full for B&B use. haha
Guinea Hens are what you need to eat ticks (I actually wrote a blog article about it as I kept seeing them around here and wondered why).
It's all fun. Even stinky chickens.
 

JBloggs

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Our chickens are scared to death of insects. When we catch a grasshopper or something and pitch it in pen, the chickens run as far away as they can get, and stay there!
They would be great though as a miniature version of agritourism, to let city folk feel like they're really on a farm. There are a lot of interesting chickens available with amazing feathering and coloring.
It took us years to perfect a pen that the preditors can't get into. Wire buried deep into the ground so they can't dig under, chicken wire on top so they can't come in from above. Still have occasional problems with black snakes getting eggs..
We did the same, buried chicken wire under ground on a post 2 feet down, covered said coop with chicken wire, we would lose more than we kept. Everything wanted those chooks! Not just the eggs. Yeah, all in all it was way expensive to have chickens. Way more than it was worth, but it was fun for that stage of our lives when we were tree hugging the Northwest.

 

gillumhouse

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We're considering buying some chicks to start having our own eggs. Our neighbor across the road has a hen house with no hens and in talks with him he's willing to keep the hens if we buy the feed. Of course he can have eggs too, but as a single guy, that's not many eggs!
Do any of you have your own chickens? Do you have to inform your b&b insurance carrier that you're providing home grown eggs?.
We have a City Ordinance that says NO farm animals and lists chickens, cows, horses, goats, and pigs in City Limits.
 

JBloggs

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Here is something (sort of on topic) about pink slime ground beef - in our roanoke paper today. Interesting point that one commenter makes about it being safer to eat unknown meat at a farmer's market then the gvmt regulated meat. Also in the article stating that the green slime meat may be safer than the non green slime. So there ya go EAT UP EVERYONE!
Ps for those healthy people who want turkey sausage - there is a little note about that in there too.
http://blogs.roanoke.com/fridgemagnet/2012/03/is-ground-beef-safer-with-or-without-pink-slime/
 

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