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USA TODAY Travel Article: Do you regularly turn off lights, TV in your hotel room?

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Madeleine

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Although no one has ever said those words why else would they walk out and leave everything running other than they paid for it? I think it's irresponsible but we've been here long enough to know there are an awful lot of people out there who have never heard the expression: Use it up, wear it out, make do or do without.
Just the things I see thrown in the trash here make me understand the attitude to just throw it out is pretty pervasive.
We joke with guests that we return all the bottles and cans they leave behind for our weekly 'coffee money at Starbucks'. A lot of times we hear back, 'You get money for those bottles? You have to take them back to the store? I wouldn't do that, what a waste of time.'
 

Arks

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I was surprised at how many in the poll turn everything off when they leave. Good for them (if they're being honest).
I've been known to leave the TV on when I leave my hotel room, for admittedly good for nothing reasons. Most hotel TVs these days return to the "welcome to our hotel menu" when you turn it back on, and since I'm not familiar with the local channel lineup, I have to break out of their menu system then go looking for the channel I was watching before I turned the TV off earlier. To punish them for this inconvenience, I often leave the TV so it stays on my favorite channel.
As far as lights, I might leave one on, but only one, so I don't walk into a strange dark room when I return.
Heat or A/C goes off. I'm a little too green to go so far as to leave that on. Hotel rooms are small enough to get back to ideal temperature pretty quickly.
 

Highlands John

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We have a Gold standard from the local green tourism scheme. It never ceases to amaze me how many people comment positively on this, or cite it as a reason for booking on our feedback form, but still leave the lights, TV and/or heating on when they go out, or leave an array of phones and laptops switched on all day.
 

gillumhouse

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I was surprised at how many in the poll turn everything off when they leave. Good for them (if they're being honest).
I've been known to leave the TV on when I leave my hotel room, for admittedly good for nothing reasons. Most hotel TVs these days return to the "welcome to our hotel menu" when you turn it back on, and since I'm not familiar with the local channel lineup, I have to break out of their menu system then go looking for the channel I was watching before I turned the TV off earlier. To punish them for this inconvenience, I often leave the TV so it stays on my favorite channel.
As far as lights, I might leave one on, but only one, so I don't walk into a strange dark room when I return.
Heat or A/C goes off. I'm a little too green to go so far as to leave that on. Hotel rooms are small enough to get back to ideal temperature pretty quickly..
I leave a light on so I do not come back to the dark room. I usually do not watch TV but would possibly turn it on when leaving for the "occupied" room theory. But I rarely travel anyway..... At a B & B I do not leave lights on OR the TV. I am VERY costs conscious.
 

JBloggs

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Guests who left for the day with the tv blaring and ceiling fan on, I knocked and knocked, were they still here or not? I left and came back an hour later. They had been gone, I thought the tv was drowning out "other sounds" so didn't dare go in.
 

JBloggs

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A room decided to lock the front door (remember we have the door key pad which means IT IS ALWAYS LOCKED) and so they double bolted the door and put the chain across. Of course we have other rooms here, three tonight. Isn't that just so sweet. Yeah common sense, where is that thread? Because they see no other car they take it upon themselves to lock up tight. No other cars because they are OUT RIGHT NOW!
If I say something then I will be the bad guy. I will be the overbearing innkeeper. You locked people out you maroons!
 

gillumhouse

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A room decided to lock the front door (remember we have the door key pad which means IT IS ALWAYS LOCKED) and so they double bolted the door and put the chain across. Of course we have other rooms here, three tonight. Isn't that just so sweet. Yeah common sense, where is that thread? Because they see no other car they take it upon themselves to lock up tight. No other cars because they are OUT RIGHT NOW!
If I say something then I will be the bad guy. I will be the overbearing innkeeper. You locked people out you maroons!.
Our 99 year old door has a button in the lock that when engaged, locks the door from the outside BUT the knob turns on the inside allowing exit. We use that because there is a skeleton key for the lock and when turned, the inside is locked in also. One guest enjoyed keeping vigil at our Chapel so I allowed her to do my Saturday night - and she locked up when she came in (we told her the door would not be shut tight so when she came in, just push it shut). We ended up removing the key from the lock where we kept it (I think we put it in the mail basket - I will have to look...). Had there been a problem requiring quick exit, we would have been SOL getting the key to turn just the right way.
 

Arks

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A room decided to lock the front door (remember we have the door key pad which means IT IS ALWAYS LOCKED) and so they double bolted the door and put the chain across. Of course we have other rooms here, three tonight. Isn't that just so sweet. Yeah common sense, where is that thread? Because they see no other car they take it upon themselves to lock up tight. No other cars because they are OUT RIGHT NOW!
If I say something then I will be the bad guy. I will be the overbearing innkeeper. You locked people out you maroons!.
Joey Bloggs said:
...they double bolted the door and put the chain across.
OK, I've got to ask. If the keypad means the door is always locked, why the chain? Why the bolt? Can't you fix it so the door is always locked by the keypad and only the keypad?
Or screw down the other stuff so only you, with a screwdriver, can activate it? I'll bet a husband who can climb through tight spaces to fix rattling pipes could fix this problem too.
 

JBloggs

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A room decided to lock the front door (remember we have the door key pad which means IT IS ALWAYS LOCKED) and so they double bolted the door and put the chain across. Of course we have other rooms here, three tonight. Isn't that just so sweet. Yeah common sense, where is that thread? Because they see no other car they take it upon themselves to lock up tight. No other cars because they are OUT RIGHT NOW!
If I say something then I will be the bad guy. I will be the overbearing innkeeper. You locked people out you maroons!.
Joey Bloggs said:
...they double bolted the door and put the chain across.
OK, I've got to ask. If the keypad means the door is always locked, why the chain? Why the bolt? Can't you fix it so the door is always locked by the keypad and only the keypad?
Or screw down the other stuff so only you, with a screwdriver, can activate it? I'll bet a husband who can climb through tight spaces to fix rattling pipes could fix this problem too.
.
Arkansawyer said:
Joey Bloggs said:
...they double bolted the door and put the chain across.
OK, I've got to ask. If the keypad means the door is always locked, why the chain? Why the bolt? Can't you fix it so the door is always locked by the keypad and only the keypad?
Or screw down the other stuff so only you, with a screwdriver, can activate it? I'll bet a husband who can climb through tight spaces to fix rattling pipes could fix this problem too.
The door is 115+ years old. We added the keypad, but left all the original hardware. It is not a new door. It IS always locked by the key pad. Oddly enough, this morning it is 45 degrees and they are leaving the door WIDE OPEN.
We don't need to fix this problem. May I share this with y'all, when I post something here I really don't need everyone to fix it for me, I am just sharing the issue. In 8 years the first time someone has locked the inside bolt on the front door, do I need to replace or remove all the hardware> NO. It is not a "problem" it is a complaint.
 

Arks

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A room decided to lock the front door (remember we have the door key pad which means IT IS ALWAYS LOCKED) and so they double bolted the door and put the chain across. Of course we have other rooms here, three tonight. Isn't that just so sweet. Yeah common sense, where is that thread? Because they see no other car they take it upon themselves to lock up tight. No other cars because they are OUT RIGHT NOW!
If I say something then I will be the bad guy. I will be the overbearing innkeeper. You locked people out you maroons!.
Joey Bloggs said:
...they double bolted the door and put the chain across.
OK, I've got to ask. If the keypad means the door is always locked, why the chain? Why the bolt? Can't you fix it so the door is always locked by the keypad and only the keypad?
Or screw down the other stuff so only you, with a screwdriver, can activate it? I'll bet a husband who can climb through tight spaces to fix rattling pipes could fix this problem too.
.
Arkansawyer said:
Joey Bloggs said:
...they double bolted the door and put the chain across.
OK, I've got to ask. If the keypad means the door is always locked, why the chain? Why the bolt? Can't you fix it so the door is always locked by the keypad and only the keypad?
Or screw down the other stuff so only you, with a screwdriver, can activate it? I'll bet a husband who can climb through tight spaces to fix rattling pipes could fix this problem too.
The door is 115+ years old. We added the keypad, but left all the original hardware. It is not a new door. It IS always locked by the key pad. Oddly enough, this morning it is 45 degrees and they are leaving the door WIDE OPEN.
We don't need to fix this problem. May I share this with y'all, when I post something here I really don't need everyone to fix it for me, I am just sharing the issue. In 8 years the first time someone has locked the inside bolt on the front door, do I need to replace or remove all the hardware> NO. It is not a "problem" it is a complaint.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
...when I post something here I really don't need everyone to fix it for me...
We'll all try to remember that, but please realize it's not easy for us to keep our noses out of stuff. Solving problems is what we do all day, every day.
 

JBloggs

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A room decided to lock the front door (remember we have the door key pad which means IT IS ALWAYS LOCKED) and so they double bolted the door and put the chain across. Of course we have other rooms here, three tonight. Isn't that just so sweet. Yeah common sense, where is that thread? Because they see no other car they take it upon themselves to lock up tight. No other cars because they are OUT RIGHT NOW!
If I say something then I will be the bad guy. I will be the overbearing innkeeper. You locked people out you maroons!.
Joey Bloggs said:
...they double bolted the door and put the chain across.
OK, I've got to ask. If the keypad means the door is always locked, why the chain? Why the bolt? Can't you fix it so the door is always locked by the keypad and only the keypad?
Or screw down the other stuff so only you, with a screwdriver, can activate it? I'll bet a husband who can climb through tight spaces to fix rattling pipes could fix this problem too.
.
Arkansawyer said:
Joey Bloggs said:
...they double bolted the door and put the chain across.
OK, I've got to ask. If the keypad means the door is always locked, why the chain? Why the bolt? Can't you fix it so the door is always locked by the keypad and only the keypad?
Or screw down the other stuff so only you, with a screwdriver, can activate it? I'll bet a husband who can climb through tight spaces to fix rattling pipes could fix this problem too.
The door is 115+ years old. We added the keypad, but left all the original hardware. It is not a new door. It IS always locked by the key pad. Oddly enough, this morning it is 45 degrees and they are leaving the door WIDE OPEN.
We don't need to fix this problem. May I share this with y'all, when I post something here I really don't need everyone to fix it for me, I am just sharing the issue. In 8 years the first time someone has locked the inside bolt on the front door, do I need to replace or remove all the hardware> NO. It is not a "problem" it is a complaint.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
...when I post something here I really don't need everyone to fix it for me...
We'll all try to remember that, but please realize it's not easy for us to keep our noses out of stuff. Solving problems is what we do all day, every day.
.
Arkansawyer said:
Joey Bloggs said:
...when I post something here I really don't need everyone to fix it for me...
We'll all try to remember that, but please realize it's not easy for us to keep our noses out of stuff. Solving problems is what we do all day, every day.
I know. I am the same. I see an issue and try to solve it.
BTW the other shoe fell when they walked into the dining room and said "Oh are there more guests here?" I said "Mm hm" and walked back with the coffee.
I know it is habit, esp those in cities. My cousin from Modesto locked everything all the time, locked themselves out of their room, it is just habit. I remember when I moved to Australia and we went into a shop and I locked the vehicle. What are you doing? I was telling my daughters about the time I was behind the armed robber when I went in to pay for gas (they didn't have pay at the pump then!) and I just stood there acted like I didn't notice, I had no choice. CITY LIFE.
 

Breakfast Diva

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I know it is habit, esp those in cities. My cousin from Modesto locked everything all the time, locked themselves out of their room, it is just habit. I remember when I moved to Australia and we went into a shop and I locked the vehicle. What are you doing? I was telling my daughters about the time I was behind the armed robber when I went in to pay for gas (they didn't have pay at the pump then!) and I just stood there acted like I didn't notice, I had no choice. CITY LIFE.
I know what you mean. We never lock cars here and a lot of the time the front door is unlocked. We lock everything up at night in the inn. What really annoys me is the car alarm beeps from the guests. Some of them lock it (chirp) when they get out to check in, then 5-10 minutes later chirp...get their luggage...chirp...come back in...chirp...get something else in their car. Except for a 'neighbor' 1/4 mile away, there's nothing around here for miles! Who's going to steal their stuff??? All it does is disturb my peace and interfers with all the real birds chirping. I wasn't even that obsessive about locking my car in Los Angeles!
 

gillumhouse

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A room decided to lock the front door (remember we have the door key pad which means IT IS ALWAYS LOCKED) and so they double bolted the door and put the chain across. Of course we have other rooms here, three tonight. Isn't that just so sweet. Yeah common sense, where is that thread? Because they see no other car they take it upon themselves to lock up tight. No other cars because they are OUT RIGHT NOW!
If I say something then I will be the bad guy. I will be the overbearing innkeeper. You locked people out you maroons!.
Joey Bloggs said:
...they double bolted the door and put the chain across.
OK, I've got to ask. If the keypad means the door is always locked, why the chain? Why the bolt? Can't you fix it so the door is always locked by the keypad and only the keypad?
Or screw down the other stuff so only you, with a screwdriver, can activate it? I'll bet a husband who can climb through tight spaces to fix rattling pipes could fix this problem too.
.
Arkansawyer said:
Joey Bloggs said:
...they double bolted the door and put the chain across.
OK, I've got to ask. If the keypad means the door is always locked, why the chain? Why the bolt? Can't you fix it so the door is always locked by the keypad and only the keypad?
Or screw down the other stuff so only you, with a screwdriver, can activate it? I'll bet a husband who can climb through tight spaces to fix rattling pipes could fix this problem too.
The door is 115+ years old. We added the keypad, but left all the original hardware. It is not a new door. It IS always locked by the key pad. Oddly enough, this morning it is 45 degrees and they are leaving the door WIDE OPEN.
We don't need to fix this problem. May I share this with y'all, when I post something here I really don't need everyone to fix it for me, I am just sharing the issue. In 8 years the first time someone has locked the inside bolt on the front door, do I need to replace or remove all the hardware> NO. It is not a "problem" it is a complaint.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
...when I post something here I really don't need everyone to fix it for me...
We'll all try to remember that, but please realize it's not easy for us to keep our noses out of stuff. Solving problems is what we do all day, every day.
.
Arkansawyer said:
Joey Bloggs said:
...when I post something here I really don't need everyone to fix it for me...
We'll all try to remember that, but please realize it's not easy for us to keep our noses out of stuff. Solving problems is what we do all day, every day.
I know. I am the same. I see an issue and try to solve it.
BTW the other shoe fell when they walked into the dining room and said "Oh are there more guests here?" I said "Mm hm" and walked back with the coffee.
I know it is habit, esp those in cities. My cousin from Modesto locked everything all the time, locked themselves out of their room, it is just habit. I remember when I moved to Australia and we went into a shop and I locked the vehicle. What are you doing? I was telling my daughters about the time I was behind the armed robber when I went in to pay for gas (they didn't have pay at the pump then!) and I just stood there acted like I didn't notice, I had no choice. CITY LIFE.
.
Guests from the Beltway did not notice the deadbolt lock on the door and were spastic at the thought of not being able to lock the door to their room. Showed it to them and they relaxed - the keys were on the dresser.
 

Mtatoc

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I know it is habit, esp those in cities. My cousin from Modesto locked everything all the time, locked themselves out of their room, it is just habit. I remember when I moved to Australia and we went into a shop and I locked the vehicle. What are you doing? I was telling my daughters about the time I was behind the armed robber when I went in to pay for gas (they didn't have pay at the pump then!) and I just stood there acted like I didn't notice, I had no choice. CITY LIFE.
I know what you mean. We never lock cars here and a lot of the time the front door is unlocked. We lock everything up at night in the inn. What really annoys me is the car alarm beeps from the guests. Some of them lock it (chirp) when they get out to check in, then 5-10 minutes later chirp...get their luggage...chirp...come back in...chirp...get something else in their car. Except for a 'neighbor' 1/4 mile away, there's nothing around here for miles! Who's going to steal their stuff??? All it does is disturb my peace and interfers with all the real birds chirping. I wasn't even that obsessive about locking my car in Los Angeles!.
i agree, Diva. I find it funny that they lock their cars. And they come to breakfast at the same time but lock their cottages. Weare out in the country and then are a quarter mile off the road.....
 

Generic

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I know it is habit, esp those in cities. My cousin from Modesto locked everything all the time, locked themselves out of their room, it is just habit. I remember when I moved to Australia and we went into a shop and I locked the vehicle. What are you doing? I was telling my daughters about the time I was behind the armed robber when I went in to pay for gas (they didn't have pay at the pump then!) and I just stood there acted like I didn't notice, I had no choice. CITY LIFE.
I know what you mean. We never lock cars here and a lot of the time the front door is unlocked. We lock everything up at night in the inn. What really annoys me is the car alarm beeps from the guests. Some of them lock it (chirp) when they get out to check in, then 5-10 minutes later chirp...get their luggage...chirp...come back in...chirp...get something else in their car. Except for a 'neighbor' 1/4 mile away, there's nothing around here for miles! Who's going to steal their stuff??? All it does is disturb my peace and interfers with all the real birds chirping. I wasn't even that obsessive about locking my car in Los Angeles!.
Well, they broke into my car last night and went through it looking for anything electronic. Found nothing. You live in the city, you get used to checking that it's locked.
 

JBloggs

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I know it is habit, esp those in cities. My cousin from Modesto locked everything all the time, locked themselves out of their room, it is just habit. I remember when I moved to Australia and we went into a shop and I locked the vehicle. What are you doing? I was telling my daughters about the time I was behind the armed robber when I went in to pay for gas (they didn't have pay at the pump then!) and I just stood there acted like I didn't notice, I had no choice. CITY LIFE.
I know what you mean. We never lock cars here and a lot of the time the front door is unlocked. We lock everything up at night in the inn. What really annoys me is the car alarm beeps from the guests. Some of them lock it (chirp) when they get out to check in, then 5-10 minutes later chirp...get their luggage...chirp...come back in...chirp...get something else in their car. Except for a 'neighbor' 1/4 mile away, there's nothing around here for miles! Who's going to steal their stuff??? All it does is disturb my peace and interfers with all the real birds chirping. I wasn't even that obsessive about locking my car in Los Angeles!.
Well, they broke into my car last night and went through it looking for anything electronic. Found nothing. You live in the city, you get used to checking that it's locked.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
Well, they broke into my car last night and went through it looking for anything electronic. Found nothing. You live in the city, you get used to checking that it's locked.
Hope it wasn't damaged.
In Southern Calf besides having your car stolen and across the border, which happens way too often, they break in just for the change in your ashtray or console, we DIDN'T lock vehicles for that reason. Break the window in the door to get to 50 cents in pennys...and your deductable wouldn't even be close to it!
 

April

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I know it is habit, esp those in cities. My cousin from Modesto locked everything all the time, locked themselves out of their room, it is just habit. I remember when I moved to Australia and we went into a shop and I locked the vehicle. What are you doing? I was telling my daughters about the time I was behind the armed robber when I went in to pay for gas (they didn't have pay at the pump then!) and I just stood there acted like I didn't notice, I had no choice. CITY LIFE.
I know what you mean. We never lock cars here and a lot of the time the front door is unlocked. We lock everything up at night in the inn. What really annoys me is the car alarm beeps from the guests. Some of them lock it (chirp) when they get out to check in, then 5-10 minutes later chirp...get their luggage...chirp...come back in...chirp...get something else in their car. Except for a 'neighbor' 1/4 mile away, there's nothing around here for miles! Who's going to steal their stuff??? All it does is disturb my peace and interfers with all the real birds chirping. I wasn't even that obsessive about locking my car in Los Angeles!.
My car does it on it's own- no way to stop it
 

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I know it is habit, esp those in cities. My cousin from Modesto locked everything all the time, locked themselves out of their room, it is just habit. I remember when I moved to Australia and we went into a shop and I locked the vehicle. What are you doing? I was telling my daughters about the time I was behind the armed robber when I went in to pay for gas (they didn't have pay at the pump then!) and I just stood there acted like I didn't notice, I had no choice. CITY LIFE.
I know what you mean. We never lock cars here and a lot of the time the front door is unlocked. We lock everything up at night in the inn. What really annoys me is the car alarm beeps from the guests. Some of them lock it (chirp) when they get out to check in, then 5-10 minutes later chirp...get their luggage...chirp...come back in...chirp...get something else in their car. Except for a 'neighbor' 1/4 mile away, there's nothing around here for miles! Who's going to steal their stuff??? All it does is disturb my peace and interfers with all the real birds chirping. I wasn't even that obsessive about locking my car in Los Angeles!.
Well, they broke into my car last night and went through it looking for anything electronic. Found nothing. You live in the city, you get used to checking that it's locked.
.
Living in a city is far different than living out in the sticks. We now live out in the sticks! So far out that they could take a buldozer to our house and draw little attention. So we do not lock up. Might as well save the door from distruction. But, living here cuts down on the chance of breakins. No big money here! Plus, strange cars are noted and remembered.
 

gillumhouse

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I know it is habit, esp those in cities. My cousin from Modesto locked everything all the time, locked themselves out of their room, it is just habit. I remember when I moved to Australia and we went into a shop and I locked the vehicle. What are you doing? I was telling my daughters about the time I was behind the armed robber when I went in to pay for gas (they didn't have pay at the pump then!) and I just stood there acted like I didn't notice, I had no choice. CITY LIFE.
I know what you mean. We never lock cars here and a lot of the time the front door is unlocked. We lock everything up at night in the inn. What really annoys me is the car alarm beeps from the guests. Some of them lock it (chirp) when they get out to check in, then 5-10 minutes later chirp...get their luggage...chirp...come back in...chirp...get something else in their car. Except for a 'neighbor' 1/4 mile away, there's nothing around here for miles! Who's going to steal their stuff??? All it does is disturb my peace and interfers with all the real birds chirping. I wasn't even that obsessive about locking my car in Los Angeles!.
Well, they broke into my car last night and went through it looking for anything electronic. Found nothing. You live in the city, you get used to checking that it's locked.
.
Living in a city is far different than living out in the sticks. We now live out in the sticks! So far out that they could take a buldozer to our house and draw little attention. So we do not lock up. Might as well save the door from distruction. But, living here cuts down on the chance of breakins. No big money here! Plus, strange cars are noted and remembered.
.
Hollowwood said:
Living in a city is far different than living out in the sticks. We now live out in the sticks! So far out that they could take a buldozer to our house and draw little attention. So we do not lock up. Might as well save the door from distruction. But, living here cuts down on the chance of breakins. No big money here! Plus, strange cars are noted and remembered.
The road into my City (pop.2300) is 2-lane twisty - a sports car or motorcycle considers it great - so you can take your time coming in, but getting back out does not make for a fast getaway. Those with nasty on their mind usually go elsewhere because they cannot get out fast!
 

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