What do you lable the 'cheap' rooms?

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TheBeachHouse

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People have commented that they want rates on the brochure. We added rates for all rooms, but realized it took up too much space and is too much detail. So we want to publish just the rates. We have two rates - one for the more desirable rooms and one for the less desirable.
example - 4 premium rooms - $150 night
2 cheap rooms - $100 night.
So we have lots of words for the more desirable rooms - premium, deluxe, superior, first-class.
What do you call the cheap rooms? standard? economy? small? noisy? jk.
Looking for ideas.
 

EmptyNest

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Do not put rates on your brochure! It will date them and then you will need to reproduce when your rates change. Just say "see website for rates." Who cares what "people" whoever they are say. It is your money paying for them. Oh, And why a brochure???? Waste of time. A rackcard is all you need..REALLY!!!
 

TheBeachHouse

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Do not put rates on your brochure! It will date them and then you will need to reproduce when your rates change. Just say "see website for rates." Who cares what "people" whoever they are say. It is your money paying for them. Oh, And why a brochure???? Waste of time. A rackcard is all you need..REALLY!!!.
thank you for your suggestion.
 

Arks

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I agree completely with EmptyNest. I only put rates on my website, so when I need to change them, I only have the one place to update. Putting rates in print means the whole print job needs to be thrown out and new ones printed. You could mark out the old rate on the brochures, but that looks horrible. And old copies that still lie around will have outdated rates and people won't like that.
The whole purpose of advertising, business cards, and rack cards is to drive people to your website to get all the details.
Yes, brochures are out. Rack cards are the way to go. Just enough info to get them interested, and to the website.
And I try to avoid making big changes just because a handful of people mention them. Those who want to see rates in the brochure will be fine. When the rates aren't there, they'll go to the website if they're really interested.
And finally, to answer your question, I'd call the cheaper rooms "Standard Rooms".
 

Madeleine

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We have a range on the brochures. And it is a WIDE range to cover many years of using the brochures. The rates are
High season: $150-$250 (nothing is $250!)
Quiet season: $130-$200 (nothing is $200!)
So I don't mention the room size at all.
No matter what you put the guest will always want the lowest amount shown. ie - $130 for the largest room in July. I have them to hand out to lookers who are in town staying elsewhere. Something in hand makes sure they remember the name! We also have them in info centers.
As EN says, make it a rack card, 2 sided. A brochure in the sense of a 6 sided trifold isn't necessary and you can get really sharp looking rack cards.
 

Generic

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QBSB, KBSB, QBPB. That's it. The type of bed and bath.
 

Arks

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You might also look at how the cruise ships categorize their differently-priced cabins.
 

Copperhead

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Once upon a time brochures were the only way to provide your information. Now even some State Welcome centers have WiFi or at least digital kiosk stations to check out accommodations.
So create a 2 sided rack card that will not age itself. Provide details that will also serve to last for several years. All you need is to provide enough to hook them into going to your website for more info.
For other purposes, use standard for your more basic rooms as it is a industry standard wording. Do not use words that downplay what you have (i.e. cheap, basic, economy,...) as for some $100 is not cheap!
 

OnTheShore

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FWIW, we still have a tri-fold brochure (in color), with pricing on a separate 1/3-page insert (black and white, one-sided), which we can update as needed. We have a stockpile of the brochures, but produce the inserts only in more limited numbers.
 

TheBeachHouse

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Once upon a time brochures were the only way to provide your information. Now even some State Welcome centers have WiFi or at least digital kiosk stations to check out accommodations.
So create a 2 sided rack card that will not age itself. Provide details that will also serve to last for several years. All you need is to provide enough to hook them into going to your website for more info.
For other purposes, use standard for your more basic rooms as it is a industry standard wording. Do not use words that downplay what you have (i.e. cheap, basic, economy,...) as for some $100 is not cheap!.
There are still a lot of paper people. We have people drive up to the visitors' center and ask if there are places to stay. The brochure is handy there. It also sits at several restaurants, the Chamber of Commerce, grocery stores in the area and at a highway rest stop.
We had dozens of people take one at the open house on Sunday. And many commented, "so glad you have your rates in here. most people don't."
My question was how to simplify publishing rates. At this point, I'm leaning toward, "premium rooms, $xxx in season, $xxx off season. Standard rooms $xxx in season, $xxx off season. All rooms have ocean views. Continental breakfast included."
 

EmptyNest

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Once upon a time brochures were the only way to provide your information. Now even some State Welcome centers have WiFi or at least digital kiosk stations to check out accommodations.
So create a 2 sided rack card that will not age itself. Provide details that will also serve to last for several years. All you need is to provide enough to hook them into going to your website for more info.
For other purposes, use standard for your more basic rooms as it is a industry standard wording. Do not use words that downplay what you have (i.e. cheap, basic, economy,...) as for some $100 is not cheap!.
There are still a lot of paper people. We have people drive up to the visitors' center and ask if there are places to stay. The brochure is handy there. It also sits at several restaurants, the Chamber of Commerce, grocery stores in the area and at a highway rest stop.
We had dozens of people take one at the open house on Sunday. And many commented, "so glad you have your rates in here. most people don't."
My question was how to simplify publishing rates. At this point, I'm leaning toward, "premium rooms, $xxx in season, $xxx off season. Standard rooms $xxx in season, $xxx off season. All rooms have ocean views. Continental breakfast included."
.
I think 99% of us think you are wasting effort and money on a brochure. You can put the same info on a rack card and that is much more cost efficient. I would not put in or off season. Just do the RATE RANGE and make it easy on yourself. Really....brochures are OUT!!!
And if you are looking for great prices on rackcards..go to GOTPRINT.net the best around.
 

Silverspoon

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We have a range on the brochures. And it is a WIDE range to cover many years of using the brochures. The rates are
High season: $150-$250 (nothing is $250!)
Quiet season: $130-$200 (nothing is $200!)
So I don't mention the room size at all.
No matter what you put the guest will always want the lowest amount shown. ie - $130 for the largest room in July. I have them to hand out to lookers who are in town staying elsewhere. Something in hand makes sure they remember the name! We also have them in info centers.
As EN says, make it a rack card, 2 sided. A brochure in the sense of a 6 sided trifold isn't necessary and you can get really sharp looking rack cards..
We do exactly the same thing...range of rates, adding $25 on the printed rack card to our highest rate. For a very busy weekend in summer we would the highest rack card rate for a stay that is less than the minimum stay. Eventually, the highest rate becomes a reality for our regular rates so we can continue to use the rack cards over many years, saving us on printing costs.
 

Madeleine

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Once upon a time brochures were the only way to provide your information. Now even some State Welcome centers have WiFi or at least digital kiosk stations to check out accommodations.
So create a 2 sided rack card that will not age itself. Provide details that will also serve to last for several years. All you need is to provide enough to hook them into going to your website for more info.
For other purposes, use standard for your more basic rooms as it is a industry standard wording. Do not use words that downplay what you have (i.e. cheap, basic, economy,...) as for some $100 is not cheap!.
There are still a lot of paper people. We have people drive up to the visitors' center and ask if there are places to stay. The brochure is handy there. It also sits at several restaurants, the Chamber of Commerce, grocery stores in the area and at a highway rest stop.
We had dozens of people take one at the open house on Sunday. And many commented, "so glad you have your rates in here. most people don't."
My question was how to simplify publishing rates. At this point, I'm leaning toward, "premium rooms, $xxx in season, $xxx off season. Standard rooms $xxx in season, $xxx off season. All rooms have ocean views. Continental breakfast included."
.
Is there a difference in view? Example: Ocean view rooms $x. Garden view rooms $y.
I hate 'premium' and 'standard' and 'deluxe' and all of those words because I always think of standard as being cheap. Plus, there is no industry standard for using those words. Your 'standard' is someone else's 'deluxe' because it's all relative to the place.
So, if you can figure out different wording it would set you apart. Of course people are going to still ask what's the difference in the room other than the price! Which is why you could use descriptive words to your advantage.
 

JBloggs

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If you must, leave the space blank...
Then stamp on the seasons rates, or for that year.
 

TheBeachHouse

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Once upon a time brochures were the only way to provide your information. Now even some State Welcome centers have WiFi or at least digital kiosk stations to check out accommodations.
So create a 2 sided rack card that will not age itself. Provide details that will also serve to last for several years. All you need is to provide enough to hook them into going to your website for more info.
For other purposes, use standard for your more basic rooms as it is a industry standard wording. Do not use words that downplay what you have (i.e. cheap, basic, economy,...) as for some $100 is not cheap!.
There are still a lot of paper people. We have people drive up to the visitors' center and ask if there are places to stay. The brochure is handy there. It also sits at several restaurants, the Chamber of Commerce, grocery stores in the area and at a highway rest stop.
We had dozens of people take one at the open house on Sunday. And many commented, "so glad you have your rates in here. most people don't."
My question was how to simplify publishing rates. At this point, I'm leaning toward, "premium rooms, $xxx in season, $xxx off season. Standard rooms $xxx in season, $xxx off season. All rooms have ocean views. Continental breakfast included."
.
Is there a difference in view? Example: Ocean view rooms $x. Garden view rooms $y.
I hate 'premium' and 'standard' and 'deluxe' and all of those words because I always think of standard as being cheap. Plus, there is no industry standard for using those words. Your 'standard' is someone else's 'deluxe' because it's all relative to the place.
So, if you can figure out different wording it would set you apart. Of course people are going to still ask what's the difference in the room other than the price! Which is why you could use descriptive words to your advantage.
.
Madeleine said:
Is there a difference in view? Example: Ocean view rooms $x. Garden view rooms $y.
I hate 'premium' and 'standard' and 'deluxe' and all of those words because I always think of standard as being cheap. Plus, there is no industry standard for using those words. Your 'standard' is someone else's 'deluxe' because it's all relative to the place.
So, if you can figure out different wording it would set you apart. Of course people are going to still ask what's the difference in the room other than the price! Which is why you could use descriptive words to your advantage.
No. All rooms have ocean views. And it's not the bed size either. That would be easier.
I agree about the words. Reason for my question. Interesting discussion, though.
 

Madeleine

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Once upon a time brochures were the only way to provide your information. Now even some State Welcome centers have WiFi or at least digital kiosk stations to check out accommodations.
So create a 2 sided rack card that will not age itself. Provide details that will also serve to last for several years. All you need is to provide enough to hook them into going to your website for more info.
For other purposes, use standard for your more basic rooms as it is a industry standard wording. Do not use words that downplay what you have (i.e. cheap, basic, economy,...) as for some $100 is not cheap!.
There are still a lot of paper people. We have people drive up to the visitors' center and ask if there are places to stay. The brochure is handy there. It also sits at several restaurants, the Chamber of Commerce, grocery stores in the area and at a highway rest stop.
We had dozens of people take one at the open house on Sunday. And many commented, "so glad you have your rates in here. most people don't."
My question was how to simplify publishing rates. At this point, I'm leaning toward, "premium rooms, $xxx in season, $xxx off season. Standard rooms $xxx in season, $xxx off season. All rooms have ocean views. Continental breakfast included."
.
Is there a difference in view? Example: Ocean view rooms $x. Garden view rooms $y.
I hate 'premium' and 'standard' and 'deluxe' and all of those words because I always think of standard as being cheap. Plus, there is no industry standard for using those words. Your 'standard' is someone else's 'deluxe' because it's all relative to the place.
So, if you can figure out different wording it would set you apart. Of course people are going to still ask what's the difference in the room other than the price! Which is why you could use descriptive words to your advantage.
.
Madeleine said:
Is there a difference in view? Example: Ocean view rooms $x. Garden view rooms $y.
I hate 'premium' and 'standard' and 'deluxe' and all of those words because I always think of standard as being cheap. Plus, there is no industry standard for using those words. Your 'standard' is someone else's 'deluxe' because it's all relative to the place.
So, if you can figure out different wording it would set you apart. Of course people are going to still ask what's the difference in the room other than the price! Which is why you could use descriptive words to your advantage.
No. All rooms have ocean views. And it's not the bed size either. That would be easier.
I agree about the words. Reason for my question. Interesting discussion, though.
.
I don't label the rates by the type of room because it doesn't matter. Just the seasonal rate. It's really more so guests can self-select out because $155 is too much. The guest who wants to argue to pay $155 for the $205 room is going to argue whether the room is a 'standard' or a 'deluxe'. They just will because that's who they are.
 

Joey Camb

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We use standard and superior - people previous to us used Executive as we have a lot of business travellers - however I refuse to use that word as its a nonsense, what does executive really mean? ie I would assume it would mean super kitted out for the business traveller which it wasn't.
 

Arks

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How about Coach and Business Class ;-)
 

seashanty

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i recommend rack cards definitely over brochures. who is asking that the rates be on the cards?
i have no problem with something like classic rooms and deluxe rooms ...
if you really want to put rates on the cards, how about those peelable labels with $100 etc. so you can change them when you change your rates? you know someone is still bound to come to you with an old card and say 'your card (or brochure) says this much for a room'
 
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