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Would you take a “haycation” down on the farm?

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Morticia

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Interesting to note that if you take your 'haycation' in a foreign country you are subjected to strict reentry regulations when you come home.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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Yes, I take a hay-cation every year. I am an equestrian and I have ridden in many different countries including nearly every region of Italy. I wouldn't have it any other way !
 

Penelope

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Yes, I take a hay-cation every year. I am an equestrian and I have ridden in many different countries including nearly every region of Italy. I wouldn't have it any other way !
.
The Farmers Daughter said:
Yes, I take a hay-cation every year. I am an equestrian and I have ridden in many different countries including nearly every region of Italy. I wouldn't have it any other way !
Here is sit drooling

 

seashanty

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i'd take a haycation as long as i could 'bale' out of the barn jobs if it wasn't for me ... (you can applaud or groan now)
 

gillumhouse

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Weatherbury Farm in Avella, PA gives a farming certificate to the kids that come. I cannot remember what it is called exactly but they give it a cute name and the kids love it. I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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Weatherbury Farm in Avella, PA gives a farming certificate to the kids that come. I cannot remember what it is called exactly but they give it a cute name and the kids love it. I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine..
gillumhouse said:
I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine.
Same here, but I have to laugh at what appeals to some folks. I had a woman come out here from a chichi manhattan address one weekend specifically for a 'down home' package where she could go to a neighboring farm, milk cows by hand, churn butter etc. She worked for Martha Stewart and just loved her 'country experience.'
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action.
 

gillumhouse

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Weatherbury Farm in Avella, PA gives a farming certificate to the kids that come. I cannot remember what it is called exactly but they give it a cute name and the kids love it. I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine..
gillumhouse said:
I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine.
Same here, but I have to laugh at what appeals to some folks. I had a woman come out here from a chichi manhattan address one weekend specifically for a 'down home' package where she could go to a neighboring farm, milk cows by hand, churn butter etc. She worked for Martha Stewart and just loved her 'country experience.'
.
And I bet she pontificates to everyone about farms because she is now an "expert" on farm life.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action..
Innkeeper To Go said:
Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action
I would have to wonder about the insurance. Greenhorns and livestock don't often mix.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action..
Innkeeper To Go said:
Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action
I would have to wonder about the insurance. Greenhorns and livestock don't often mix.
.
As someone who's been directly behind 54 big French cows as they were moving to the higher alpages in Springtime, I can tell you that I'd be concerned, too.
Who knew cows were so much better hikers than me? And who knew that whole thing about you-know-what rolling downhill was actually and really true in real life. Trust me, you don't really want to be behind 54 overly stimulated cows on the path up the mountain. Live and learn.
 

Morticia

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Weatherbury Farm in Avella, PA gives a farming certificate to the kids that come. I cannot remember what it is called exactly but they give it a cute name and the kids love it. I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine..
gillumhouse said:
I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine.
Same here, but I have to laugh at what appeals to some folks. I had a woman come out here from a chichi manhattan address one weekend specifically for a 'down home' package where she could go to a neighboring farm, milk cows by hand, churn butter etc. She worked for Martha Stewart and just loved her 'country experience.'
.
It's not the sort of vacation I would really appreciate, but if someone gets a better understanding of where food comes from...go for it!
Me, city girl never saw 'real' spinach until I left home. Spinach and many, many other veggies came out of a can.
My mother saw her dinner having its head chopped off when she was a young 'un and she swore off meat for quite a few years. That image was so vivid to her she was still talking about it to me when I was a kid.
 

muirford

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Weatherbury Farm in Avella, PA gives a farming certificate to the kids that come. I cannot remember what it is called exactly but they give it a cute name and the kids love it. I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine..
gillumhouse said:
I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine.
Same here, but I have to laugh at what appeals to some folks. I had a woman come out here from a chichi manhattan address one weekend specifically for a 'down home' package where she could go to a neighboring farm, milk cows by hand, churn butter etc. She worked for Martha Stewart and just loved her 'country experience.'
.
Call it the 'Green Acres' package.
 

bbinnsitters

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Weatherbury Farm in Avella, PA gives a farming certificate to the kids that come. I cannot remember what it is called exactly but they give it a cute name and the kids love it. I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine..
gillumhouse said:
I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine.
Same here, but I have to laugh at what appeals to some folks. I had a woman come out here from a chichi manhattan address one weekend specifically for a 'down home' package where she could go to a neighboring farm, milk cows by hand, churn butter etc. She worked for Martha Stewart and just loved her 'country experience.'
.
It's not the sort of vacation I would really appreciate, but if someone gets a better understanding of where food comes from...go for it!
Me, city girl never saw 'real' spinach until I left home. Spinach and many, many other veggies came out of a can.
My mother saw her dinner having its head chopped off when she was a young 'un and she swore off meat for quite a few years. That image was so vivid to her she was still talking about it to me when I was a kid.
.
Hubby is still not a big fan of chicken as he had to catch the darn things and kill them himself! Can't say as I blame him!
 

gillumhouse

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Weatherbury Farm in Avella, PA gives a farming certificate to the kids that come. I cannot remember what it is called exactly but they give it a cute name and the kids love it. I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine..
gillumhouse said:
I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine.
Same here, but I have to laugh at what appeals to some folks. I had a woman come out here from a chichi manhattan address one weekend specifically for a 'down home' package where she could go to a neighboring farm, milk cows by hand, churn butter etc. She worked for Martha Stewart and just loved her 'country experience.'
.
It's not the sort of vacation I would really appreciate, but if someone gets a better understanding of where food comes from...go for it!
Me, city girl never saw 'real' spinach until I left home. Spinach and many, many other veggies came out of a can.
My mother saw her dinner having its head chopped off when she was a young 'un and she swore off meat for quite a few years. That image was so vivid to her she was still talking about it to me when I was a kid.
.
Hubby is still not a big fan of chicken as he had to catch the darn things and kill them himself! Can't say as I blame him!
.
I had the privilege of plucking them. Nothing equates to the aroma of chicken feathers dunked in boiling water! (For city folk - that loosens the feathers)
 

JBloggs

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Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action..
Innkeeper To Go said:
Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action
I would have to wonder about the insurance. Greenhorns and livestock don't often mix.
.
The Farmers Daughter said:
Innkeeper To Go said:
Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action
I would have to wonder about the insurance. Greenhorns and livestock don't often mix.
In our state, since there has been a push for agritourism to help save the farmers whose goods have been sold out by china, each farm - even those hosting corn mazes have an authorized state placard stating that any person on any farm for agritourism is there at their own risk and the owner/operator of the event holds zero liability. I read these placards at a few diff events now, even the place where we milked a cow - you are on your own if you touch baby animals or milk cows or climb aboard a John Deere. This is a good thing for the farmers who are trying to recoup their losses.
Edited to say before someone mentions it - they do not let people run wild on their land, they have proper bathrooms, handwashing stations, and safety measures in place. The liability is not theirs if YOU go to their farm YOU are the one taking the risk. I think this has been a really good push - it is a win win for those who get to visit these farms normally off the circuit to visitors.
Me - I would do a farm stay in a heart beat. Esp in the Spring when babies are born. But I like to camp, I like bacon over an open fire and the stars over head. I am totally not interested in spas, indulgence and Vegas style surroundings (I mention Vegas as that is where people go to be waited on and pampered like kings and queens.) Gimmee a new born lamb and I will spend all day in a field with it.

 

gillumhouse

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Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action..
Innkeeper To Go said:
Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action
I would have to wonder about the insurance. Greenhorns and livestock don't often mix.
.
The Farmers Daughter said:
Innkeeper To Go said:
Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action
I would have to wonder about the insurance. Greenhorns and livestock don't often mix.
In our state, since there has been a push for agritourism to help save the farmers whose goods have been sold out by china, each farm - even those hosting corn mazes have an authorized state placard stating that any person on any farm for agritourism is there at their own risk and the owner/operator of the event holds zero liability. I read these placards at a few diff events now, even the place where we milked a cow - you are on your own if you touch baby animals or milk cows or climb aboard a John Deere. This is a good thing for the farmers who are trying to recoup their losses.
Edited to say before someone mentions it - they do not let people run wild on their land, they have proper bathrooms, handwashing stations, and safety measures in place. The liability is not theirs if YOU go to their farm YOU are the one taking the risk. I think this has been a really good push - it is a win win for those who get to visit these farms normally off the circuit to visitors.
Me - I would do a farm stay in a heart beat. Esp in the Spring when babies are born. But I like to camp, I like bacon over an open fire and the stars over head. I am totally not interested in spas, indulgence and Vegas style surroundings (I mention Vegas as that is where people go to be waited on and pampered like kings and queens.) Gimmee a new born lamb and I will spend all day in a field with it.

.
I will go camping with you, just have done the farm in real-time long enough. I could live it, just do not want to visit it. Pampering holds no charm for me either as I am nOT a "Helpless Hannah". Would take farm over pamper.
 

Morticia

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Weatherbury Farm in Avella, PA gives a farming certificate to the kids that come. I cannot remember what it is called exactly but they give it a cute name and the kids love it. I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine..
gillumhouse said:
I grew up an a farm so no, I will not be taking a haycation. I already know how to milk a cow without a milking machine.
Same here, but I have to laugh at what appeals to some folks. I had a woman come out here from a chichi manhattan address one weekend specifically for a 'down home' package where she could go to a neighboring farm, milk cows by hand, churn butter etc. She worked for Martha Stewart and just loved her 'country experience.'
.
Call it the 'Green Acres' package.
.
muirford said:
Call it the 'Green Acres' package.
See, THAT would be fun. Kind of like doing an innkeeping training course and calling it 'Fawlty Towers.'
 

Morticia

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Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action..
Innkeeper To Go said:
Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action
I would have to wonder about the insurance. Greenhorns and livestock don't often mix.
.
The Farmers Daughter said:
Innkeeper To Go said:
Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action
I would have to wonder about the insurance. Greenhorns and livestock don't often mix.
In our state, since there has been a push for agritourism to help save the farmers whose goods have been sold out by china, each farm - even those hosting corn mazes have an authorized state placard stating that any person on any farm for agritourism is there at their own risk and the owner/operator of the event holds zero liability. I read these placards at a few diff events now, even the place where we milked a cow - you are on your own if you touch baby animals or milk cows or climb aboard a John Deere. This is a good thing for the farmers who are trying to recoup their losses.
Edited to say before someone mentions it - they do not let people run wild on their land, they have proper bathrooms, handwashing stations, and safety measures in place. The liability is not theirs if YOU go to their farm YOU are the one taking the risk. I think this has been a really good push - it is a win win for those who get to visit these farms normally off the circuit to visitors.
Me - I would do a farm stay in a heart beat. Esp in the Spring when babies are born. But I like to camp, I like bacon over an open fire and the stars over head. I am totally not interested in spas, indulgence and Vegas style surroundings (I mention Vegas as that is where people go to be waited on and pampered like kings and queens.) Gimmee a new born lamb and I will spend all day in a field with it.

.
I will go camping with you, just have done the farm in real-time long enough. I could live it, just do not want to visit it. Pampering holds no charm for me either as I am nOT a "Helpless Hannah". Would take farm over pamper.
.
Me, I'm a Helpless Hannah! Take care of me. I would absolutely love a spa vacation where all the spa stuff was included. Pummel me, buff me, make me pretty. Dinner with candlelight. A sauna. Sign me up!
 

muirford

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Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action..
Innkeeper To Go said:
Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action
I would have to wonder about the insurance. Greenhorns and livestock don't often mix.
.
The Farmers Daughter said:
Innkeeper To Go said:
Gites rural have been a mainstay of French farms for years now. Many farms couldn't survive without the income.
But even as well established as they are, the farmers still really crack up at the cityfolk coming out to the countryside. It's all just hard work to them.
But man oh man are those farmstays popular all across the French countryside. It's about time American farmers started in on the action
I would have to wonder about the insurance. Greenhorns and livestock don't often mix.
In our state, since there has been a push for agritourism to help save the farmers whose goods have been sold out by china, each farm - even those hosting corn mazes have an authorized state placard stating that any person on any farm for agritourism is there at their own risk and the owner/operator of the event holds zero liability. I read these placards at a few diff events now, even the place where we milked a cow - you are on your own if you touch baby animals or milk cows or climb aboard a John Deere. This is a good thing for the farmers who are trying to recoup their losses.
Edited to say before someone mentions it - they do not let people run wild on their land, they have proper bathrooms, handwashing stations, and safety measures in place. The liability is not theirs if YOU go to their farm YOU are the one taking the risk. I think this has been a really good push - it is a win win for those who get to visit these farms normally off the circuit to visitors.
Me - I would do a farm stay in a heart beat. Esp in the Spring when babies are born. But I like to camp, I like bacon over an open fire and the stars over head. I am totally not interested in spas, indulgence and Vegas style surroundings (I mention Vegas as that is where people go to be waited on and pampered like kings and queens.) Gimmee a new born lamb and I will spend all day in a field with it.

.
I will go camping with you, just have done the farm in real-time long enough. I could live it, just do not want to visit it. Pampering holds no charm for me either as I am nOT a "Helpless Hannah". Would take farm over pamper.
.
Me, I'm a Helpless Hannah! Take care of me. I would absolutely love a spa vacation where all the spa stuff was included. Pummel me, buff me, make me pretty. Dinner with candlelight. A sauna. Sign me up!
.
Morticia said:
Take care of me. I would absolutely love a spa vacation where all the spa stuff was included.
Me too. The best part of the conference at the Homestead was the aromatherapy massage with a mineral bath starter. Next to meeting innmates. Although that would have been better if we had all gotten a massage.

"Fawlty Towers" boot camp for aspirings. I like that idea myself.
 
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