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Samster

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Just finished a stay at a nice larger inn and at check-out when we turned in our key, we were handed a nice card with the inn information on it and a sweet treat.
The card read, "Have something sweet to say?" And then it went on to say, that if we had any problems to please tell the innkeeper immediately so that they could address the problem and improve their performance in the future. If we had a good time to tell everyone we know because word of mouth was the strongest form of advertising. In addition, if we were computer savvy to spread the word by going on the travel sites (which were listed). Finally, the note thanked us for our stay.
I really liked this approach and using "sweet" and giving us a final small chocolatey treat was OK by me!
Please, discuss...
 

Samster

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seems a bit pushy but a nice way to approach it..
I actually liked it, and I'll tell you why. It didn't seem pushy to me at all. How many B&Bs get reviews where the guest writes that something was wrong with the room but they never said anything while they were staying there? I (the guest in this case) actually read this short card while standing there and remembered that there was a tiny issue with our room that I wanted to mention but had forgotten. Would I have written that in an online review? NO. If the next guest in the room noticed it, would they? Quite possibly.
 

Arks

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No, doesn't seem at all pushy to me. It's a good idea, and well done.
 

EmptyNest

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seems a bit pushy but a nice way to approach it..
I actually liked it, and I'll tell you why. It didn't seem pushy to me at all. How many B&Bs get reviews where the guest writes that something was wrong with the room but they never said anything while they were staying there? I (the guest in this case) actually read this short card while standing there and remembered that there was a tiny issue with our room that I wanted to mention but had forgotten. Would I have written that in an online review? NO. If the next guest in the room noticed it, would they? Quite possibly.
.
I guess pushy was not the correct term. I was thinking ...if they just shoved a card at you...but if they took time to explain it when giving it to you....then...I am ok with it. One of those "you had to be there moments."
 

BBBBoB

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It is always delicate asking "Did you like me...............?" This approach seems like a very sensible way to do it. Thanks for the info.

BBBBob
 

Madeleine

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I am curious how any of us could make this work. Just in the grand scheme of things I will be asking Guest A to please do a review and here's a little something to remind you of the wonderful stay. In the meantime Guest B's breakfast is sitting in the kitchen getting cold and Guest C is standing there waiting for directions and no one is now really happy with their experience.
It sounds good. I'm looking at the implementation from my perspective only. A stack of something hidden in the desk that I pull out that now seems contrived as everyone watches me do it. It works if it seems somewhat one-to-one which rarely happens here as everyone comes and goes at all hours from before I get up to (I could hang them) 12:30! (THEY would not have gotten ANYTHING from me.)
And because Guest D may be really unhappy, I have now shown that there is something to be expected at check-out when they may leave while I'm in the bathroom and now they're even more peeved because they didn't get the special goodbye. (Yes, it's been one of those weeks!)
I see it working for a certain kind of inn, no doubt. One that is less like someone's home and more like a boutique hotel.
Then again, I'm getting the bad vibe this week that I am not being 'gracious' enough again. I'm not bending over backwards quite far enough.
 

Samster

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seems a bit pushy but a nice way to approach it..
I actually liked it, and I'll tell you why. It didn't seem pushy to me at all. How many B&Bs get reviews where the guest writes that something was wrong with the room but they never said anything while they were staying there? I (the guest in this case) actually read this short card while standing there and remembered that there was a tiny issue with our room that I wanted to mention but had forgotten. Would I have written that in an online review? NO. If the next guest in the room noticed it, would they? Quite possibly.
.
I guess pushy was not the correct term. I was thinking ...if they just shoved a card at you...but if they took time to explain it when giving it to you....then...I am ok with it. One of those "you had to be there moments."
.
:)
 

Samster

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I am curious how any of us could make this work. Just in the grand scheme of things I will be asking Guest A to please do a review and here's a little something to remind you of the wonderful stay. In the meantime Guest B's breakfast is sitting in the kitchen getting cold and Guest C is standing there waiting for directions and no one is now really happy with their experience.
It sounds good. I'm looking at the implementation from my perspective only. A stack of something hidden in the desk that I pull out that now seems contrived as everyone watches me do it. It works if it seems somewhat one-to-one which rarely happens here as everyone comes and goes at all hours from before I get up to (I could hang them) 12:30! (THEY would not have gotten ANYTHING from me.)
And because Guest D may be really unhappy, I have now shown that there is something to be expected at check-out when they may leave while I'm in the bathroom and now they're even more peeved because they didn't get the special goodbye. (Yes, it's been one of those weeks!)
I see it working for a certain kind of inn, no doubt. One that is less like someone's home and more like a boutique hotel.
Then again, I'm getting the bad vibe this week that I am not being 'gracious' enough again. I'm not bending over backwards quite far enough..
I think that it's more of a case of you being spread too thin. :)
 

Joey Camb

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I am curious how any of us could make this work. Just in the grand scheme of things I will be asking Guest A to please do a review and here's a little something to remind you of the wonderful stay. In the meantime Guest B's breakfast is sitting in the kitchen getting cold and Guest C is standing there waiting for directions and no one is now really happy with their experience.
It sounds good. I'm looking at the implementation from my perspective only. A stack of something hidden in the desk that I pull out that now seems contrived as everyone watches me do it. It works if it seems somewhat one-to-one which rarely happens here as everyone comes and goes at all hours from before I get up to (I could hang them) 12:30! (THEY would not have gotten ANYTHING from me.)
And because Guest D may be really unhappy, I have now shown that there is something to be expected at check-out when they may leave while I'm in the bathroom and now they're even more peeved because they didn't get the special goodbye. (Yes, it's been one of those weeks!)
I see it working for a certain kind of inn, no doubt. One that is less like someone's home and more like a boutique hotel.
Then again, I'm getting the bad vibe this week that I am not being 'gracious' enough again. I'm not bending over backwards quite far enough..
Just wondering if it was something instead of on check out you put in the room? ie card in an envelope with a chocolate on top to attract attention?
 

Kay Nein

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I do like this approach - especially the "sweet" reference. We often have extra cookies or muffins in the morning and try to send them off with the guests (so they don't end up in the trash) so that would be a great way to do it.
I see how it wouldn't work, say in Madeleine's case, where there might just be one person & the ones leaving couldn't get that personalized send-off. There are two of us here, so I'm usually cleaning up from breakfast service as the other is telling everyone goodbye.
Thanks for the suggestion!
 

Copperhead

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I like being selective when it comes to asking for a review! There are some I am just not sure about, while many of these have surprised me with nice reviews without asking!
I do like the sweet addition and the last sweet reminder of the stay.
While nothing is a fool proof for all, Maddie you could try putting something like this in the room the last day of their stay instead of handing it on check out when you are wearing too many hats. You could then be selective if you wish or give to all check outs. This of course does not work for one nighters if you are being selective.
If you want to not discriminate, you could have 2 different cards, one just a pleasant thank you for the stay and the other include the review sites. Both adding the sweet. And if the topic is brought up, all will think they got the same message.
 

Highlands John

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I like being selective when it comes to asking for a review! There are some I am just not sure about, while many of these have surprised me with nice reviews without asking!
I do like the sweet addition and the last sweet reminder of the stay.
While nothing is a fool proof for all, Maddie you could try putting something like this in the room the last day of their stay instead of handing it on check out when you are wearing too many hats. You could then be selective if you wish or give to all check outs. This of course does not work for one nighters if you are being selective.
If you want to not discriminate, you could have 2 different cards, one just a pleasant thank you for the stay and the other include the review sites. Both adding the sweet. And if the topic is brought up, all will think they got the same message..
copperhead said:
I like being selective when it comes to asking for a review!
Absolutely.
 

Samster

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I like being selective when it comes to asking for a review! There are some I am just not sure about, while many of these have surprised me with nice reviews without asking!
I do like the sweet addition and the last sweet reminder of the stay.
While nothing is a fool proof for all, Maddie you could try putting something like this in the room the last day of their stay instead of handing it on check out when you are wearing too many hats. You could then be selective if you wish or give to all check outs. This of course does not work for one nighters if you are being selective.
If you want to not discriminate, you could have 2 different cards, one just a pleasant thank you for the stay and the other include the review sites. Both adding the sweet. And if the topic is brought up, all will think they got the same message..
Brilliant idea, Copperhead, about tailoring it for different guests!

 
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