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Bed and Breakfast... or Hotel

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souslechene

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In France the equivalent of B&B is calles a "Chambres d'hôtes".
Since 2007, we have a legal definition as follows :
The "chambres d'hôtes" rental activity the bundled supply of night and breakfast. It is limited to a maximum of five rooms for a maximum capacity of fifteen people. Guests must be welcomes by the owners.
Each guest room offers access to a bathroom and a toilet. It is compliant with the regulations in the areas of hygiene, safety and sanitation. The supply of bed linens is compulsory.

We are allowed to serve evening meals to hosted guests only. It must be taked at the "family" table and only one menu is available.
If we have more than 5 rooms, we would likely be requalified as a hotel with much stricter regulations (fire, hygiene, tax, ...).
If we serve evening meal to guests not hosted for the night, we would be requalified as a restaurant with much stricter regulations (fire, hygiene, tax, ...).
How is this question managed on your side ?
 

Alibi Ike

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Every state, county & town does it differently! There is no country-wide definition of an inn, B&B or hotel.
 

souslechene

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Every state, county & town does it differently! There is no country-wide definition of an inn, B&B or hotel..
Alibi Ike said:
Every state, county & town does it differently! There is no country-wide definition of an inn, B&B or hotel.
Well, in Europe, each country has its own regulation as well. I always think of USA as a country, but, no, it isn't so much...
 

JBloggs

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We have a couple others in there as well now, such as a "Country Inn." Each state, county and city/town has their own set of regulations and definitions. Some areas are very stringent, some lax.
 

gillumhouse

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Every state, county & town does it differently! There is no country-wide definition of an inn, B&B or hotel..
Alibi Ike said:
Every state, county & town does it differently! There is no country-wide definition of an inn, B&B or hotel.
Well, in Europe, each country has its own regulation as well. I always think of USA as a country, but, no, it isn't so much...
.
I am reasonably certain that different regions (provinces) in France have their own rules on certain things that may be more stringent than the rules of the Country of France.
The USA is a Country, but it is comprised of 50 States that make their own rules for their citizens but the State's rules must not violate the US Laws made by representatives elected by the people of each State.
Some cities have rules for B & B that they cannot COOK a breakfast - everything must be pre-packaged or catered. In my small State of West Virginia, if you have 6 guestrooms or less, you do not have to have a commercial kitchen (if you have 7 or more, you must). I can serve any meal to a registered guest - but not anyone who just comes in - then I would also be a restaurant (no way!). The number of rooms permitted varys from State to State. We pay taxes to the Federal Government, to the State, to the County we live in (WV has 55 counties with their rules), and to the City if we live in one - and they have their own rules.
For example: My State has an extra hotel tax of up to 6% in addition to the sales tax of 6%. Because I live in the city limits of a city that did not pass an orfinance to impose that tax, I cannot collect that extra 6% tax. The extra 6% is required to go 1/2 to the governmental agency that collects the money (which would be my city if we collected it) and 1/2 to support the visitors bureau that promotes tourism in your city/county. We do not have a COUNTY visitors bureau since the 2 largest cities in my county EACH have one and I function as the visitors bureau in my city for free - so we do not have a recipient for the other half of the money. Therefore, my city never enacted the ordinance. If I were located in the county - meaning outside city limits - I would be collecting it.
 

Alibi Ike

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Every state, county & town does it differently! There is no country-wide definition of an inn, B&B or hotel..
Alibi Ike said:
Every state, county & town does it differently! There is no country-wide definition of an inn, B&B or hotel.
Well, in Europe, each country has its own regulation as well. I always think of USA as a country, but, no, it isn't so much...
.
souslechene said:
Alibi Ike said:
Every state, county & town does it differently! There is no country-wide definition of an inn, B&B or hotel.
Well, in Europe, each country has its own regulation as well. I always think of USA as a country, but, no, it isn't so much...
So here, instead of thinking France, Italy, Germany, etc, think NY, NJ, CT as the individual 'country'. Each one has its own rules. Like the EU doesn't dictate what each individual country can call a hotel or a B&B.
 

Joey Camb

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In the UK we all operate under the same regulations (ie country city county town etc) However what you call yourself is decided in the most bonkers way imaginable.
B&B - usually more like a home stay 6 guests or less (in theory) and more relaxed legislation (no dinner)
Guest House - run on a more professional basis and can be as big as you like may offer dinner. Usually run by a family and have a member of staff or owner in as much as possible if not all the time. ]
Hotel - same as guest house but must have a restaurant/ do dinners and have a liscence. (hotels are also split for rating purposes into small hotel and hotel)
Guest Accommodation - anything that does not fit into the above catogories ie places that don't do breakfast mainly
Farm Stay - usually B&B on a farm (what a shocker)
Self catering - usually a flat sort of set up where you look after youself but have someone on call in case of emergency
Restaurant with accommodation - pretty self explanitory
Pub with accommodation - like B&B with a pub attached. (rules to do with children in pubs in the UK are a lot more relaxed than in the US)
For myself we are called by our guests B&B, guest house, guest accommodation or hotel depending what day it is as the lines that define it are a bit fuzzy.
 

One Day

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In America......the federal government can set rules, laws, policies, etc......
States can use what the federal hands down.....or make them more strict.....States cannot weaken them. This same progression happens with States down to local governments.
States can differ from one to another.
The federal government is not involved with lodging that I know of, as of yet.
States can make their own laws..........as can counties, townships and municipalities.
Big problem none of you probably have to deal with.........Federal laws that are interperated by States......then broken down by the local governments......each adding their own redundencies and twists
 
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