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aieechihuahua

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There has been a lot of discussion on what is best to use for blogging - Google's Blogger or Wordpress. Since my web host will not put the nec. stuff on their server for me to use Wordpress, I use Blogger.
It has also been said that it is just as advantageous to have your Blogger blog linked into your website as it is to have your Wordpress blog right ON your site, and that search engine won't differentiate - that they see the blog posts as more pages of your website.
If this is so, then why don't my blog posts show up as pages on my site in Google Analytics. If anyone out there is using Wordpress and Google Analytic...do your blog posts show up as pages of your web site in GA?
 

Morticia

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Do you have the code on the blog pages that Google needs to track them?
 

aieechihuahua

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Do you have the code on the blog pages that Google needs to track them?.
Yes. And I do track the blog as a seperate web site because that is the only way I can.
I have no doubt that my Blogger blog is being seen. It shows up in the search engine when keywords used are entered, but is it being seen as a part of my website, or as new pages/content on my site? That is where I think the difference with Blogger and Wordpress lies. But I need some proof. Anyone?
 

Morticia

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Do you have the code on the blog pages that Google needs to track them?.
Yes. And I do track the blog as a seperate web site because that is the only way I can.
I have no doubt that my Blogger blog is being seen. It shows up in the search engine when keywords used are entered, but is it being seen as a part of my website, or as new pages/content on my site? That is where I think the difference with Blogger and Wordpress lies. But I need some proof. Anyone?
.
It may be because the pages are 'on' your website in a 'hall of mirrors' kind of way. If you are tracking them separately on GA, as 2 separate websites, what data's missing that you would want them to both show up under your own website?
Also, the tracker number is different. I'm not sure how or if you could combine 2 different tracker numbers to feed into the same Analytics grouping.
 

aieechihuahua

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website.
 

Morticia

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
Ah. OK, well, how about the thread on PAII, then, where someone explains how they are seeing their website improve in the rankings after doing what you've done by making the blog part of your website? There seems to be some small research done there by those posters. That would seem to indicate that it does work. (And that I have to get around to doing that with my own site!)
 

aieechihuahua

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
Ah. OK, well, how about the thread on PAII, then, where someone explains how they are seeing their website improve in the rankings after doing what you've done by making the blog part of your website? There seems to be some small research done there by those posters. That would seem to indicate that it does work. (And that I have to get around to doing that with my own site!)
.
Thanks Bree - I am going to check there again, but that thread got pretty contentious for a while, with both sides claiming they were right, so I thought I would see what's cookin over here. I like this forum better and feel peolple are more honest...perhaps because on the anonimity. (God, I can't spell worth a damn!)
 

Morticia

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
Ah. OK, well, how about the thread on PAII, then, where someone explains how they are seeing their website improve in the rankings after doing what you've done by making the blog part of your website? There seems to be some small research done there by those posters. That would seem to indicate that it does work. (And that I have to get around to doing that with my own site!)
.
Thanks Bree - I am going to check there again, but that thread got pretty contentious for a while, with both sides claiming they were right, so I thought I would see what's cookin over here. I like this forum better and feel peolple are more honest...perhaps because on the anonimity. (God, I can't spell worth a damn!)
.
I read for the factual stuff on how to do it and whether it was working, then I booked out of the thread.
 

swirt

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Do you have the code on the blog pages that Google needs to track them?.
Yes. And I do track the blog as a seperate web site because that is the only way I can.
I have no doubt that my Blogger blog is being seen. It shows up in the search engine when keywords used are entered, but is it being seen as a part of my website, or as new pages/content on my site? That is where I think the difference with Blogger and Wordpress lies. But I need some proof. Anyone?
.
Blogger blog is being seen. It shows up in the search engine when keywords used are entered, but is it being seen as a part of my website, or as new pages/content on my site? That is where I think the difference with Blogger and Wordpress lies. But I need some proof. Anyone?
No, your blog is not being seen as part of your main website, because it is not part of your main website, it is a subdomain of your site. Google treats subdomains as separate sites.
Example www.yourdomain.com is your website
blog.yourdomain.com is a subdomain and is generally seen as a different site with the same owner
www.yourdomain.com/blog is a subdirectory which is seen as the same site
There are advantages and disadvantages to it being seen separately so it is not necessarily a bad thing.
The disadvantage is that your main site may not be seen as growing. This is not the huge benefit that people think it is. There are plenty of sites sitting with longlasting good placement in google that haven't changed in years.
The advantage is that you have a second site that is growing and hopefully every page of that site is in some way linking back to your main site.
The benefits in both directions are pretty marginal and can be caonsidered (at this time) to be a wash. Spending 15 minutes agonizing over this is 15 minutes that could have been spend writing another great blog post which will do far more for you than any changing from subdomain to subdirectory.
The reason yours don't both show up in Google Analystics under the same tracking is that you are using two different account numbers (even different user numbers). Using the same tracking id on both should work if they are set up correctly....however for tracking data, you'd probably be better off keeping them separate..easier to see the differences between them.
 

swirt

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content.
Yes and no...there is really a lot of misinformation about this. Search engines like content...new or old is not as important unless you are running a news portal. Think of each page that you create (whether blog or standard website) like a fishing hook placed in the water. The more hooks in the water, the more likely you are to catch fish (people searching). The fact that you have a bunch of hooks in the water doesn't make your one main hook (home page) more appealing .... but if enough people keep finding all of your hooks, the more likely they are to create links to you...and that does have the potential to make all of your pages show up higher in the SERPS.
Now if each of your pages links back to the main site, then there is some search engine benefit, but whether it is from a subdomain or a subdirectory makes very little difference.
 

swirt

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
Ah. OK, well, how about the thread on PAII, then, where someone explains how they are seeing their website improve in the rankings after doing what you've done by making the blog part of your website? There seems to be some small research done there by those posters. That would seem to indicate that it does work. (And that I have to get around to doing that with my own site!)
.
Ah. OK, well, how about the thread on PAII, then, where someone explains how they are seeing their website improve in the rankings after doing what you've done by making the blog part of your website?
I haven't seen the case being made on the other forum so it is probably silly for me to comment directly, but there is one advantage if people are newly setting up a blog to keeping it as part of their own site (not on a subdomain) The advantage is TIME and trust.
When a new site is built (even if it is built on a subdomain) Google looks at it a bit skeptically and will usually not allow it to "run with the big dogs". (Some call it a sandbox..others more correctly call it a sandbox-like result.) The issue is basically that unless a lot of already trusted sites vote for the new site (by way of linking to it) Google is going to keep a skeptical eye on it until some time (6-12months) has past and some links are acquired and those links have "aged".
So if you have an existing B&B site that has been around for a bit, and you put the blog in a subdirectory of that site (www.mydomain.com/blog) then that blog is going to be exempt from the sandbox-like effect because it is part of an already trusted site...so you start seeing results right out of the gate.
If you put the bog on a newly created subdomain blog/mydomain.com then that blog is going to have to prove itself with a bit of time and some incoming links from trusted sources.
The liklihood though that if someone put a blog in a subdomain of their site and immediately saw a change in where they show up for major searches is pretty small ..if they did move up it is entirely possible it was unrelated to the blog (without knowing the specifics of the timing it is hard to say)
As I have mentioned before..Google is not like a wrapped up birthday present that if you shake it, you can immediately listen to the result to figure out what it is....Google is more like a gag gift...you shake it and try to listen but hear nothing..then you set it down on the table and 2 weeks later it makes noise. If somebody picked it up and it made noise, they would conclude it was something they did, when it might be just responding to something someone else did a month ago.

 

muirford

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
Ah. OK, well, how about the thread on PAII, then, where someone explains how they are seeing their website improve in the rankings after doing what you've done by making the blog part of your website? There seems to be some small research done there by those posters. That would seem to indicate that it does work. (And that I have to get around to doing that with my own site!)
.
Ah. OK, well, how about the thread on PAII, then, where someone explains how they are seeing their website improve in the rankings after doing what you've done by making the blog part of your website?
I haven't seen the case being made on the other forum so it is probably silly for me to comment directly, but there is one advantage if people are newly setting up a blog to keeping it as part of their own site (not on a subdomain) The advantage is TIME and trust.
When a new site is built (even if it is built on a subdomain) Google looks at it a bit skeptically and will usually not allow it to "run with the big dogs". (Some call it a sandbox..others more correctly call it a sandbox-like result.) The issue is basically that unless a lot of already trusted sites vote for the new site (by way of linking to it) Google is going to keep a skeptical eye on it until some time (6-12months) has past and some links are acquired and those links have "aged".
So if you have an existing B&B site that has been around for a bit, and you put the blog in a subdirectory of that site (www.mydomain.com/blog) then that blog is going to be exempt from the sandbox-like effect because it is part of an already trusted site...so you start seeing results right out of the gate.
If you put the bog on a newly created subdomain blog/mydomain.com then that blog is going to have to prove itself with a bit of time and some incoming links from trusted sources.
The liklihood though that if someone put a blog in a subdomain of their site and immediately saw a change in where they show up for major searches is pretty small ..if they did move up it is entirely possible it was unrelated to the blog (without knowing the specifics of the timing it is hard to say)
As I have mentioned before..Google is not like a wrapped up birthday present that if you shake it, you can immediately listen to the result to figure out what it is....Google is more like a gag gift...you shake it and try to listen but hear nothing..then you set it down on the table and 2 weeks later it makes noise. If somebody picked it up and it made noise, they would conclude it was something they did, when it might be just responding to something someone else did a month ago.

.
Here is the post that AC is referring to, FYI. The post is from Lisa Kolb at Acorn; the information is also available on their website under webinars at acorn-is.com on the google blogger handout:
To achieve the full benefit of page increase and placement like John Doe is reporting with his blog, it needs to be converted from myinn.blogspot.com to blog.myinn.com
To do gain this benefit you need to ask your hosting company to...
Set your Main URL CNAME to point to GHS.GOOGLE.COM BEFORE you do the following step. You can still setup your entire blog, without pointing the URL, but until you do it, your blog pages will not help build your web site presence in Google.
Until you have the CNAME properly set, you will be viewing your blog at http://mynn.blogspot.com once the CNAME is properly set, your blog pages will now be counting as part of your domain, and your blog address will be http://blog.myinn.com.
Tell your host: Set your CNAME for blog.your-website-address.com to point to ghs.google.com
Once they have completed this task then you will need to log into your Google Blogger Account and under the Settings - Publishing tab:
a. Click Custom Domain link b. Click Switch to Advanced Settings link c: Enter the following blog.your-website-address.com (put your web address in after blog. and before .com) d. Use a missing files host? NO e. Key the word verification as displayed
Click SAVE SETTINGS
This will change your blog from myinn.blogspot.com over to blog.mynn.com
Anything you have posted under myinn.blogspot.com, will automatically forward to blog.myinn.com
By doing this you will see each of your posting begin to build your page bulk in Google and other search engines.
You can know for sure this is working if you type the following in the Google search box:
site:myinn.com
You will see both www. pages and blog. pages adding to your presence in Google.
This process is called "setting up a sub domain" and Google uses them for everything. images.google.com, maps.google.com, videos.google.com each sub domain builds toward the Google "empire" just as both your web pages and blog pages will build towards yours!
 

swirt

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
Ah. OK, well, how about the thread on PAII, then, where someone explains how they are seeing their website improve in the rankings after doing what you've done by making the blog part of your website? There seems to be some small research done there by those posters. That would seem to indicate that it does work. (And that I have to get around to doing that with my own site!)
.
Ah. OK, well, how about the thread on PAII, then, where someone explains how they are seeing their website improve in the rankings after doing what you've done by making the blog part of your website?
I haven't seen the case being made on the other forum so it is probably silly for me to comment directly, but there is one advantage if people are newly setting up a blog to keeping it as part of their own site (not on a subdomain) The advantage is TIME and trust.
When a new site is built (even if it is built on a subdomain) Google looks at it a bit skeptically and will usually not allow it to "run with the big dogs". (Some call it a sandbox..others more correctly call it a sandbox-like result.) The issue is basically that unless a lot of already trusted sites vote for the new site (by way of linking to it) Google is going to keep a skeptical eye on it until some time (6-12months) has past and some links are acquired and those links have "aged".
So if you have an existing B&B site that has been around for a bit, and you put the blog in a subdirectory of that site (www.mydomain.com/blog) then that blog is going to be exempt from the sandbox-like effect because it is part of an already trusted site...so you start seeing results right out of the gate.
If you put the bog on a newly created subdomain blog/mydomain.com then that blog is going to have to prove itself with a bit of time and some incoming links from trusted sources.
The liklihood though that if someone put a blog in a subdomain of their site and immediately saw a change in where they show up for major searches is pretty small ..if they did move up it is entirely possible it was unrelated to the blog (without knowing the specifics of the timing it is hard to say)
As I have mentioned before..Google is not like a wrapped up birthday present that if you shake it, you can immediately listen to the result to figure out what it is....Google is more like a gag gift...you shake it and try to listen but hear nothing..then you set it down on the table and 2 weeks later it makes noise. If somebody picked it up and it made noise, they would conclude it was something they did, when it might be just responding to something someone else did a month ago.

.
Here is the post that AC is referring to, FYI. The post is from Lisa Kolb at Acorn; the information is also available on their website under webinars at acorn-is.com on the google blogger handout:
To achieve the full benefit of page increase and placement like John Doe is reporting with his blog, it needs to be converted from myinn.blogspot.com to blog.myinn.com
To do gain this benefit you need to ask your hosting company to...
Set your Main URL CNAME to point to GHS.GOOGLE.COM BEFORE you do the following step. You can still setup your entire blog, without pointing the URL, but until you do it, your blog pages will not help build your web site presence in Google.
Until you have the CNAME properly set, you will be viewing your blog at http://mynn.blogspot.com once the CNAME is properly set, your blog pages will now be counting as part of your domain, and your blog address will be http://blog.myinn.com.
Tell your host: Set your CNAME for blog.your-website-address.com to point to ghs.google.com
Once they have completed this task then you will need to log into your Google Blogger Account and under the Settings - Publishing tab:
a. Click Custom Domain link b. Click Switch to Advanced Settings link c: Enter the following blog.your-website-address.com (put your web address in after blog. and before .com) d. Use a missing files host? NO e. Key the word verification as displayed
Click SAVE SETTINGS
This will change your blog from myinn.blogspot.com over to blog.mynn.com
Anything you have posted under myinn.blogspot.com, will automatically forward to blog.myinn.com
By doing this you will see each of your posting begin to build your page bulk in Google and other search engines.
You can know for sure this is working if you type the following in the Google search box:
site:myinn.com
You will see both www. pages and blog. pages adding to your presence in Google.
This process is called "setting up a sub domain" and Google uses them for everything. images.google.com, maps.google.com, videos.google.com each sub domain builds toward the Google "empire" just as both your web pages and blog pages will build towards yours!
.
Thanks Jeanne,
The info is good about how to switch to a subdomain. If you are setting up a new blog, it is worth doing it for branding reasons.
Beyond that though, the empire building aspect is a little flawed. The "empire" offers no benefit beyond that. subdomains are treated as completely separate websites for good reason. Consider that every xyz.blogspot.com is a subdomain of blogspot...it is not treated the same as www.blogspot.com The same is true of xyz.typepad.com or xyz.ning.com In the eyes of the search engines (at least Google and Yahoo ... too soon to say about Bing) subdomains are treated as completely separate domains. (it's worth pointing out that www is actually a subdomain too) The only thing uniting the two is the registration info on the domain name.
The use of the word "empire" is a bit meaningless...it is not an SEO or search engine term. In general if you publish a page and maintain control of it and it links to your main site, then it is part of your "empire".
Sorry the "empire" aspect is as weak as Meta-bed and the meta-revist tag used by the same company. It is all based on just misconception.
 

aieechihuahua

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content.
Yes and no...there is really a lot of misinformation about this. Search engines like content...new or old is not as important unless you are running a news portal. Think of each page that you create (whether blog or standard website) like a fishing hook placed in the water. The more hooks in the water, the more likely you are to catch fish (people searching). The fact that you have a bunch of hooks in the water doesn't make your one main hook (home page) more appealing .... but if enough people keep finding all of your hooks, the more likely they are to create links to you...and that does have the potential to make all of your pages show up higher in the SERPS.
Now if each of your pages links back to the main site, then there is some search engine benefit, but whether it is from a subdomain or a subdirectory makes very little difference.
.
I so much appreciate your thoughts on this. I can't stress that enough. Your explainations and analogies are priceless. I have posted my questions on the other forum as well. Won't mention who as I have been told I am pushing them too hard so I will refain from their mention from now on. I anxiously await the replies from the usual suspects, but I really have to say you have thoroughly answered my question. Thanks so much.
 

swirt

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content.
Yes and no...there is really a lot of misinformation about this. Search engines like content...new or old is not as important unless you are running a news portal. Think of each page that you create (whether blog or standard website) like a fishing hook placed in the water. The more hooks in the water, the more likely you are to catch fish (people searching). The fact that you have a bunch of hooks in the water doesn't make your one main hook (home page) more appealing .... but if enough people keep finding all of your hooks, the more likely they are to create links to you...and that does have the potential to make all of your pages show up higher in the SERPS.
Now if each of your pages links back to the main site, then there is some search engine benefit, but whether it is from a subdomain or a subdirectory makes very little difference.
.
I so much appreciate your thoughts on this. I can't stress that enough. Your explainations and analogies are priceless. I have posted my questions on the other forum as well. Won't mention who as I have been told I am pushing them too hard so I will refain from their mention from now on. I anxiously await the replies from the usual suspects, but I really have to say you have thoroughly answered my question. Thanks so much.
.
Glad to hear my explanations have helped.
You are free to express your enthusiasm for any group you want, just as anyone else is free to express that they have read enough ;) It is what makes this particular forum tick.

 

SweetiePie

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content.
Yes and no...there is really a lot of misinformation about this. Search engines like content...new or old is not as important unless you are running a news portal. Think of each page that you create (whether blog or standard website) like a fishing hook placed in the water. The more hooks in the water, the more likely you are to catch fish (people searching). The fact that you have a bunch of hooks in the water doesn't make your one main hook (home page) more appealing .... but if enough people keep finding all of your hooks, the more likely they are to create links to you...and that does have the potential to make all of your pages show up higher in the SERPS.
Now if each of your pages links back to the main site, then there is some search engine benefit, but whether it is from a subdomain or a subdirectory makes very little difference.
.
I so much appreciate your thoughts on this. I can't stress that enough. Your explainations and analogies are priceless. I have posted my questions on the other forum as well. Won't mention who as I have been told I am pushing them too hard so I will refain from their mention from now on. I anxiously await the replies from the usual suspects, but I really have to say you have thoroughly answered my question. Thanks so much.
.
Glad to hear my explanations have helped.
You are free to express your enthusiasm for any group you want, just as anyone else is free to express that they have read enough ;) It is what makes this particular forum tick.

.
I seem to recall being told in the beginning that they'd heard enough on a certain topic and it was time to change the subject and I was posting on a thread the group had started on that subject; not even scattering it over several different threads.
 

swirt

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It isn't a matter of missing data - that is all there in Google Analytics.
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content. So I am trying to determine if Blogger blogs are in fact seen as new content (for the website it is associated with), or not, and what the analytic reports show for Wordpress users who have their blog set up diectly on their website..
One of the big perks of having a blog is that if it is set up properly, the blog will count as new content for your web site, and search engines like new content.
Yes and no...there is really a lot of misinformation about this. Search engines like content...new or old is not as important unless you are running a news portal. Think of each page that you create (whether blog or standard website) like a fishing hook placed in the water. The more hooks in the water, the more likely you are to catch fish (people searching). The fact that you have a bunch of hooks in the water doesn't make your one main hook (home page) more appealing .... but if enough people keep finding all of your hooks, the more likely they are to create links to you...and that does have the potential to make all of your pages show up higher in the SERPS.
Now if each of your pages links back to the main site, then there is some search engine benefit, but whether it is from a subdomain or a subdirectory makes very little difference.
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I so much appreciate your thoughts on this. I can't stress that enough. Your explainations and analogies are priceless. I have posted my questions on the other forum as well. Won't mention who as I have been told I am pushing them too hard so I will refain from their mention from now on. I anxiously await the replies from the usual suspects, but I really have to say you have thoroughly answered my question. Thanks so much.
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Glad to hear my explanations have helped.
You are free to express your enthusiasm for any group you want, just as anyone else is free to express that they have read enough ;) It is what makes this particular forum tick.

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I seem to recall being told in the beginning that they'd heard enough on a certain topic and it was time to change the subject and I was posting on a thread the group had started on that subject; not even scattering it over several different threads.
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SweetiePie said:
I seem to recall being told in the beginning that they'd heard enough on a certain topic and it was time to change the subject and I was posting on a thread the group had started on that subject; not even scattering it over several different threads.
That doesn't sound like something I said. If someone else expressed that to you, then they were speaking for themselves and my advice to you would be the same that I just gave.
You are welcome to keep speaking ...errr writing... about what you feel strongly about (with the request that it is on topic and avoids religion and politics)... and people are welcome to express that they agree or disagree or that they grow weary of hearing it. As long as people can agree or disagree or ignore without getting nasty, I am a happy man.
You have to also bear in mind that the thread you are talking about went on for ever spanning from July 2008 to March 2009. By then some were really tired of seeing it surface and re-surface (including me) but I never said to move on. (For others, that thread is an interesting read...but please avoid commenting and bringing it all back up again unless it is absolutely vital.
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SweetiePie

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No you're right. It wasn't you. I was just late in getting to the party.
 

swirt

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Update: In the debate over subdomain vs subdirectory for a blog, the issue from the search engine point of view no longer exists (for Google anyway). Since Google started, it has treated a subdomain as a separate website from the main domain. As of a few days back, Google now treats a subdomain as part of the main domain. So whether you use blog.mydomain,com or www.mydomain,com/blog makes no difference. It is now all counted as the same site.
http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2011/08/reorganizing-internal-vs-external.html
There are still considerations in terms of branding or ease of configuration, but there is no longer a google based reason to chose one over the other.
 

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