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Breakfast Dilemma

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ktuskey

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Some of you may have already read this already, but I need advice on how to proceed.
Our house is more of a historic - hand built house. Thus, there is no dining room. All of the other suites have *private* entrances detached from the main house. One suite, the biggest and best, has a private drive and I'd have to walk around a little to get to the door. We have purchased a nice patio table that we will put underneath our over hang. We have also purchased private patio furniture if they want to eat on their terrace or patio. The third option is to eat in-room. The main room has a full kitchen with counter top to eat there. The smallest suite has a nice table to eat in as well. The other would be more of a couch meal.
So, the problem is that there is no *indoor* dining area other than in-room. If the weather is nice, we would gladly cook breakfast and serve it at the communual table. If not, we *could* serve it in-room. However, getting hot food to the biggest suite is a bit of a challenge. I'd have to walk up a little hill and/or put it in the back of my car and deliver it. Not really an option for a good hot breakfast.
So the options are (unless you can give me a creative solution):
1. Serve on continental breakfast and call ourselve an Inn
2. Serve continental in-room or communual (weather permitting)
3. Serve hot dishes on nice weather days and continental on not so nice days
4. Say we serve continental only and on nice days surprise them with an offer for a full breakfast
The rooms are *really* nice, great location, quiet, very historic, everything is in-place except the breakfast part. We would offer great continental (home made, cinnamon rolls, etc.) so... hmm.
What say you?
 

ktuskey

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The paperwork is already in to be put on the national historic registry. It's already been approved now we're just waiting for the official stamp. Very might be a stretch, but historic none the less.
 

JBloggs

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Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha
 

muirford

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Do a delivered breakfast to the rooms - the best, most special continental plus breakfast that you can do - and emphasize the privacy and seclusion. There are other B&Bs that do that successfully - some do lovely hot four-course breakfasts delivered to the room - and some people love it because they hate to eat breakfast with other people! Don't get too hung up on inn vs. B&B - our name is 'Inn', we are really a B&B, we don't serve any other meals (most inns do) but we still manage to convey what you're going to get with our website and marketing. That's what you need to make sure you get right - setting the expectation for breakfast.
Have some lovely picnic baskets with stoneware, linens and silverware - no disposables. Have thermoses for milk, coffee, smoothies; make homemade granola; make homemade sweet muffins and savory scones; have a baked cobbler that can be served room temperature for the fruit dish; do scotch eggs or homemade egg breakfast sandwiches for protein. There are a lot of options for some wonderful breakfasts that go beyond continental (most people think muffin and coffee).
Last but not least, find a way to put a table that can used for dining (even if it's a coffee table) in the room that you are saying would be a 'couch meal'. Nothing would irritate me more than going to a place that promotes a nice in-room breakfast and having no place to set it up.
 

gillumhouse

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My house is 100 this year and the LAST thing I want is to be on the Historic Register. No offense, but it is MY house and MY money and I do not want anyone telling what I can or cannot do other than the building permits in my City.
 

egoodell

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The paperwork is already in to be put on the national historic registry. It's already been approved now we're just waiting for the official stamp. Very might be a stretch, but historic none the less..
ktuskey said:
The paperwork is already in to be put on the national historic registry. It's already been approved now we're just waiting for the official stamp. Very might be a stretch, but historic none the less.
oooh. I have heard nothing but grief from those on the historic registry. They can't do a thing without permission and can't replace anything unless it is authentic - they cant' install windows that will save energy as the glass has to be 100 years old etc. I too would not want to be in that position.
RIki
 

Hillbilly

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Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha.
Joey your cracking me up again!!!
 

JBloggs

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Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha.
Joey your cracking me up again!!!
.
Bob said:
Joey your cracking me up again!!!
Prehistoric ha ha or young whipper snapper tee hee?
Young and old, we're all in this together!
 

ktuskey

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Do a delivered breakfast to the rooms - the best, most special continental plus breakfast that you can do - and emphasize the privacy and seclusion. There are other B&Bs that do that successfully - some do lovely hot four-course breakfasts delivered to the room - and some people love it because they hate to eat breakfast with other people! Don't get too hung up on inn vs. B&B - our name is 'Inn', we are really a B&B, we don't serve any other meals (most inns do) but we still manage to convey what you're going to get with our website and marketing. That's what you need to make sure you get right - setting the expectation for breakfast.
Have some lovely picnic baskets with stoneware, linens and silverware - no disposables. Have thermoses for milk, coffee, smoothies; make homemade granola; make homemade sweet muffins and savory scones; have a baked cobbler that can be served room temperature for the fruit dish; do scotch eggs or homemade egg breakfast sandwiches for protein. There are a lot of options for some wonderful breakfasts that go beyond continental (most people think muffin and coffee).
Last but not least, find a way to put a table that can used for dining (even if it's a coffee table) in the room that you are saying would be a 'couch meal'. Nothing would irritate me more than going to a place that promotes a nice in-room breakfast and having no place to set it up..
Thank you. That is *excellent* advice. I think the picnic baskets is a killer idea. It's like a present they open up with a whole bunch of goodies in. LOVE IT. They can always come down and sit together at the patio time as long as it's nice out. Like everyone having a picnic. Man, that's great advice. Thank you SO much.
We are ordering a small bistro set for the 'couch' room. It will be bar height and you'll be able to look out the window. Well said...
Thanks again.
 

Madeleine

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I'd like to ask some questions before responding.
  1. You are due to open in a month, right?
  2. Did you make a business plan?
  3. If so, in that business plan, where did you see guests eating?
  4. What was the plan for providing food?
  5. What is the plan for cleaning up after that food service?
  6. What are you planning to make for these guests?
I'm not trying to be a grouch here, but you seem to have the cart before the horse. 'Let's open a B&B and then figure out how to run it.'
Let me ask some more questions:
  1. On your own vacation, how amenable would you be to arriving at your B&B to find you were going to have to get a lunch room tray to take your food back to your room in the rain, snow, sleet, bugs, blazing sun? (Sorry, I am not familiar with the weather in Boise, maybe it's like Vegas and it rains for 2 hours once/year so what I am worrying about isn't really a concern. Please enlighten me if eating outdoors 'in season' is something everyone there does and I'm way off course to think it's odd. Maybe the weather is a balmy 75 all the time. I really don't know. I just assumed cold, rain and bugs as part of the scenery.)
  2. Would you expect to carry your breakfast to your room? (Are you going to serve the guests if they're seated at the patio table? How will you know they are there?)
  3. If you are not really going to be interacting with the guests over breakfast (because they are going to be loading up their trays to go back to their rooms or out to the patio) why bother with breakfast at all?
I think al fresco dining is a wonderful addition to the breakfast service. We have friends who regularly serve on their covered porch in the summer. Cool breezes, great view, it's really nice. But, when the fog rolls in, everyone comes inside to eat. I am not able to imagine what the guests would think if they were told there is no place else but the porch or their room.
I will respond with what I think you should do but I want to know more about your plans before I spend more time helping. How much planning have you actually done?
 

ktuskey

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I'd like to ask some questions before responding.
  1. You are due to open in a month, right?
  2. Did you make a business plan?
  3. If so, in that business plan, where did you see guests eating?
  4. What was the plan for providing food?
  5. What is the plan for cleaning up after that food service?
  6. What are you planning to make for these guests?
I'm not trying to be a grouch here, but you seem to have the cart before the horse. 'Let's open a B&B and then figure out how to run it.'
Let me ask some more questions:
  1. On your own vacation, how amenable would you be to arriving at your B&B to find you were going to have to get a lunch room tray to take your food back to your room in the rain, snow, sleet, bugs, blazing sun? (Sorry, I am not familiar with the weather in Boise, maybe it's like Vegas and it rains for 2 hours once/year so what I am worrying about isn't really a concern. Please enlighten me if eating outdoors 'in season' is something everyone there does and I'm way off course to think it's odd. Maybe the weather is a balmy 75 all the time. I really don't know. I just assumed cold, rain and bugs as part of the scenery.)
  2. Would you expect to carry your breakfast to your room? (Are you going to serve the guests if they're seated at the patio table? How will you know they are there?)
  3. If you are not really going to be interacting with the guests over breakfast (because they are going to be loading up their trays to go back to their rooms or out to the patio) why bother with breakfast at all?
I think al fresco dining is a wonderful addition to the breakfast service. We have friends who regularly serve on their covered porch in the summer. Cool breezes, great view, it's really nice. But, when the fog rolls in, everyone comes inside to eat. I am not able to imagine what the guests would think if they were told there is no place else but the porch or their room.
I will respond with what I think you should do but I want to know more about your plans before I spend more time helping. How much planning have you actually done?.
An official take it to the "venture capitalists" business plan was not created. Originally we were thinking of creating a sunroom, but we don't have the money right now and we don't want to shake up the facade of the house. Everything else was carefully planned -- we just can't find an elegant solution to the breakfast dilemma, but I do have one avenue I'm going to explore.
The weather is Boise most of the year is dry (very dry) and the patio furniture would sit under an awning - would offer it three seasons at least. If the weather doesn't fit, then *we* would deliver nicely done picnic baskets to the rooms with nice linens, silverware, and a host of creative continental food like scones, bagels with lox, breakfast sandwiches. This serves three purposes. It adds clarity to the breakfast situation, they get it delivered to the room giving them a choice on where they want to eat, and it's like a surprise when they open it -- with a large variety of goodies.
Look, I'm not saying it's the most optimal. Obviously we would like to have a formal dining room to seat everyone, but we don't. I think I'm going to take the advice of another poster who said we should emphasize the privacy and seclusion and choice. One room has a full kitchen, the other a kitchenette, and the other has a bistro set in-room and on the patio. The communal table is very close to two of the rooms and a small walk from the other.
I just want to be upfront with the guests with no surprises. If they know this upfront, hopefully they will understand. Our rates are a little lower as a result of the lack of 'always on' communual dining.
K
 

JBloggs

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Remember not everyone likes or wants communal dining. So it is a give and take. As long as there is something nice provided!
 

Madeleine

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I'd like to ask some questions before responding.
  1. You are due to open in a month, right?
  2. Did you make a business plan?
  3. If so, in that business plan, where did you see guests eating?
  4. What was the plan for providing food?
  5. What is the plan for cleaning up after that food service?
  6. What are you planning to make for these guests?
I'm not trying to be a grouch here, but you seem to have the cart before the horse. 'Let's open a B&B and then figure out how to run it.'
Let me ask some more questions:
  1. On your own vacation, how amenable would you be to arriving at your B&B to find you were going to have to get a lunch room tray to take your food back to your room in the rain, snow, sleet, bugs, blazing sun? (Sorry, I am not familiar with the weather in Boise, maybe it's like Vegas and it rains for 2 hours once/year so what I am worrying about isn't really a concern. Please enlighten me if eating outdoors 'in season' is something everyone there does and I'm way off course to think it's odd. Maybe the weather is a balmy 75 all the time. I really don't know. I just assumed cold, rain and bugs as part of the scenery.)
  2. Would you expect to carry your breakfast to your room? (Are you going to serve the guests if they're seated at the patio table? How will you know they are there?)
  3. If you are not really going to be interacting with the guests over breakfast (because they are going to be loading up their trays to go back to their rooms or out to the patio) why bother with breakfast at all?
I think al fresco dining is a wonderful addition to the breakfast service. We have friends who regularly serve on their covered porch in the summer. Cool breezes, great view, it's really nice. But, when the fog rolls in, everyone comes inside to eat. I am not able to imagine what the guests would think if they were told there is no place else but the porch or their room.
I will respond with what I think you should do but I want to know more about your plans before I spend more time helping. How much planning have you actually done?.
An official take it to the "venture capitalists" business plan was not created. Originally we were thinking of creating a sunroom, but we don't have the money right now and we don't want to shake up the facade of the house. Everything else was carefully planned -- we just can't find an elegant solution to the breakfast dilemma, but I do have one avenue I'm going to explore.
The weather is Boise most of the year is dry (very dry) and the patio furniture would sit under an awning - would offer it three seasons at least. If the weather doesn't fit, then *we* would deliver nicely done picnic baskets to the rooms with nice linens, silverware, and a host of creative continental food like scones, bagels with lox, breakfast sandwiches. This serves three purposes. It adds clarity to the breakfast situation, they get it delivered to the room giving them a choice on where they want to eat, and it's like a surprise when they open it -- with a large variety of goodies.
Look, I'm not saying it's the most optimal. Obviously we would like to have a formal dining room to seat everyone, but we don't. I think I'm going to take the advice of another poster who said we should emphasize the privacy and seclusion and choice. One room has a full kitchen, the other a kitchenette, and the other has a bistro set in-room and on the patio. The communal table is very close to two of the rooms and a small walk from the other.
I just want to be upfront with the guests with no surprises. If they know this upfront, hopefully they will understand. Our rates are a little lower as a result of the lack of 'always on' communual dining.
K
.
A business plan is an operating manual for your business, not just something to take to the bank for money.
You NEED this so you know how to spend your time and your money. You need to know who is going to do the cleaning, when it is going to get done, are you going to clean everyday or just when the guests leave, are you supplying amenities in the rooms, how did you go about buying them, who does the taxes, who does the bookkeeping, who does the website, the marketing, the shopping for food, who makes the food, who cleans the kitchen. This is the kind of business plan I mean.
You also need a biz plan so you can chart your progress. What is your goal for the first year in biz? Break even? Make a little money? How much? What will you do for cash reserves in the event of a major appliance needing to be replaced? How will you handle an on site emergency when you are full?
Obviously you saw the problem with the dining as you bought a patio set. You also provided kitchen supplies in each room.
So, what I would do to avoid misconceptions about what it is you do is to pick ONE option only. It appears the best option is the delivered continental breakfast. Delivery to all rooms, even if you have to drive your car up the hill to the other room, YOU are the host, do not make the guests work! You can supply juice and coffee in each room utilizing the fridge and a nice coffee machine. Delivery at a set time so guests know when to expect it, or you ask on arrival when they want it.
Lots of B&B's only have continental because they are not allowed to serve a hot breakfast. As long as you are perfectly clear on your website what you are serving, guests will have less cause to complain. I would be very clear when making reservations on the phone as well. 'We serve a lovely continentla breakfast delivered right to your door every morning.'
Plan to change it up each day the same guests are staying so they don't say, 'Yeah, it was nice but not the same thing 4 days in a row. We were taking bets...blueberry muffins again today?'
 

scrambled_eggs

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Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha.
Joey Bloggs said:
Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha
Any building that is at least 50 years old is considered "historic"
 

Madeleine

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Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha.
Joey Bloggs said:
Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Whew! I'm not historic.
 

gillumhouse

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Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha.
Joey Bloggs said:
Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha
Any building that is at least 50 years old is considered "historic"
.
Any building that is at least 50 years old is considered "historic"
You have to be kidding! Around here that is not even worth mentioning. Heck, my house is not considered anything here. Too many that date to the 1800s. The Shinn log house is a circa 1778, the #2 house was next door to me but torn down to build a post office that is now moved to a new building, and the #3 house is stone and dates to 1821 (now owned by direct descendant brothers who live in the State of Washington who bought it after staying here and I told them it was on the market).
 

Copperhead

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Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha.
Joey Bloggs said:
Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha
Any building that is at least 50 years old is considered "historic"
.
Any building that is at least 50 years old is considered "historic"
You have to be kidding! Around here that is not even worth mentioning. Heck, my house is not considered anything here. Too many that date to the 1800s. The Shinn log house is a circa 1778, the #2 house was next door to me but torn down to build a post office that is now moved to a new building, and the #3 house is stone and dates to 1821 (now owned by direct descendant brothers who live in the State of Washington who bought it after staying here and I told them it was on the market).
.
gillumhouse said:
Any building that is at least 50 years old is considered "historic"
You have to be kidding! Around here that is not even worth mentioning. Heck, my house is not considered anything here. Too many that date to the 1800s. The Shinn log house is a circa 1778, the #2 house was next door to me but torn down to build a post office that is now moved to a new building, and the #3 house is stone and dates to 1821 (now owned by direct descendant brothers who live in the State of Washington who bought it after staying here and I told them it was on the market).
I was amazed, had always heard the 100 yr mark to be considered, but here ya go: www.nps.gov/nr/national_register_fundamentals.htm Makes the title loose its umph!
Being listed does have it's drawbacks as stated, before you sign up make sure you have read it all. Remember that one day you will want to sell this property and some may want to make changes the registry will not allow. So think of this long and hard before finalizing.

 

gillumhouse

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Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha.
Joey Bloggs said:
Wait, this is killing me I have to ask about it. "VERY HISTORIC" and you said 1954? More than half of the forum members here are older than that, no offense to those 'historic forum members' who I cherish, but am I getting this right?
Keith I just read the website, it was finished in 1970. Okay I am not getting it. I get the METHODS of construction being unique, not the historic part.
Now I am feeling historic...haha
Any building that is at least 50 years old is considered "historic"
.
Any building that is at least 50 years old is considered "historic"
You have to be kidding! Around here that is not even worth mentioning. Heck, my house is not considered anything here. Too many that date to the 1800s. The Shinn log house is a circa 1778, the #2 house was next door to me but torn down to build a post office that is now moved to a new building, and the #3 house is stone and dates to 1821 (now owned by direct descendant brothers who live in the State of Washington who bought it after staying here and I told them it was on the market).
.
gillumhouse said:
Any building that is at least 50 years old is considered "historic"
You have to be kidding! Around here that is not even worth mentioning. Heck, my house is not considered anything here. Too many that date to the 1800s. The Shinn log house is a circa 1778, the #2 house was next door to me but torn down to build a post office that is now moved to a new building, and the #3 house is stone and dates to 1821 (now owned by direct descendant brothers who live in the State of Washington who bought it after staying here and I told them it was on the market).
I was amazed, had always heard the 100 yr mark to be considered, but here ya go: www.nps.gov/nr/national_register_fundamentals.htm Makes the title loose its umph!
Being listed does have it's drawbacks as stated, before you sign up make sure you have read it all. Remember that one day you will want to sell this property and some may want to make changes the registry will not allow. So think of this long and hard before finalizing.

.
I put siding on my house and inserted replacement windows because the house had no insulation (it now has a little since they put an insulation over the old boards) and was very hard to heat - it is still a, shall we say, cool house - and the window frames had shrunk so much shreds of the wallpaper we were removing were found on the porch roof - and the windows were NOT open in January! Since the Historic Register was not going to be paying my heating bills, I decided being listed was not on my agenda. I have never chosen to stay at a B & B or not stay because of being a historic landmark.
Disclosure: My house is listed as a contributing factor to our Downtown being an Historic District (helps the City get grants) but that does not put restrictions on me. The Fire Dept torn down some older than mine about 5 years ago - long aftr the historic designation but this VFD would not give a hoot about historic anything.
 

Penelope

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Do a delivered breakfast to the rooms - the best, most special continental plus breakfast that you can do - and emphasize the privacy and seclusion. There are other B&Bs that do that successfully - some do lovely hot four-course breakfasts delivered to the room - and some people love it because they hate to eat breakfast with other people! Don't get too hung up on inn vs. B&B - our name is 'Inn', we are really a B&B, we don't serve any other meals (most inns do) but we still manage to convey what you're going to get with our website and marketing. That's what you need to make sure you get right - setting the expectation for breakfast.
Have some lovely picnic baskets with stoneware, linens and silverware - no disposables. Have thermoses for milk, coffee, smoothies; make homemade granola; make homemade sweet muffins and savory scones; have a baked cobbler that can be served room temperature for the fruit dish; do scotch eggs or homemade egg breakfast sandwiches for protein. There are a lot of options for some wonderful breakfasts that go beyond continental (most people think muffin and coffee).
Last but not least, find a way to put a table that can used for dining (even if it's a coffee table) in the room that you are saying would be a 'couch meal'. Nothing would irritate me more than going to a place that promotes a nice in-room breakfast and having no place to set it up..
muirford said:
Last but not least, find a way to put a table that can used for dining (even if it's a coffee table) in the room that you are saying would be a 'couch meal'. Nothing would irritate me more than going to a place that promotes a nice in-room breakfast and having no place to set it up.
I was at a place that had a coffee table that extended up to the couch to be a table at couch-sitting-height- very cool
I'll see if I can find a photo...
Unfinished coffee table that extends
 

EmptyNest

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Do a delivered breakfast to the rooms - the best, most special continental plus breakfast that you can do - and emphasize the privacy and seclusion. There are other B&Bs that do that successfully - some do lovely hot four-course breakfasts delivered to the room - and some people love it because they hate to eat breakfast with other people! Don't get too hung up on inn vs. B&B - our name is 'Inn', we are really a B&B, we don't serve any other meals (most inns do) but we still manage to convey what you're going to get with our website and marketing. That's what you need to make sure you get right - setting the expectation for breakfast.
Have some lovely picnic baskets with stoneware, linens and silverware - no disposables. Have thermoses for milk, coffee, smoothies; make homemade granola; make homemade sweet muffins and savory scones; have a baked cobbler that can be served room temperature for the fruit dish; do scotch eggs or homemade egg breakfast sandwiches for protein. There are a lot of options for some wonderful breakfasts that go beyond continental (most people think muffin and coffee).
Last but not least, find a way to put a table that can used for dining (even if it's a coffee table) in the room that you are saying would be a 'couch meal'. Nothing would irritate me more than going to a place that promotes a nice in-room breakfast and having no place to set it up..
muirford said:
Last but not least, find a way to put a table that can used for dining (even if it's a coffee table) in the room that you are saying would be a 'couch meal'. Nothing would irritate me more than going to a place that promotes a nice in-room breakfast and having no place to set it up.
I was at a place that had a coffee table that extended up to the couch to be a table at couch-sitting-height- very cool
I'll see if I can find a photo...
Unfinished coffee table that extends
.
I have seen these I think at Ikea and at a local Grand's Furniture. So you can buy them finishes. I think Laz boy has them too.
 

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