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Cheese tray?

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Morticia

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Does anyone make up cheese trays for in room? What do you put on that, how much do you charge, how do you get it to the room at the right time (so it's the right temp and not too cold or too warm)?
 

Penelope

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) )
 

Morticia

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
 

Penelope

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
We have a guest fridge upstairs and if it's supposed to be a late arrival, when they tell us their ETA, we tell them where their platter is. It's labeled with their name.
 

gillumhouse

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I don't do cheese trays. I have a basket with bananas, apples, and some pkgs. of mini cookies and crackers on each dresser. I also have a small dish with wrapped chocolates (Kisses, Bliss, Dove)...
 

Morticia

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I don't do cheese trays. I have a basket with bananas, apples, and some pkgs. of mini cookies and crackers on each dresser. I also have a small dish with wrapped chocolates (Kisses, Bliss, Dove)....
gillumhouse said:
I don't do cheese trays. I have a basket with bananas, apples, and some pkgs. of mini cookies and crackers on each dresser. I also have a small dish with wrapped chocolates (Kisses, Bliss, Dove)...
Looking for added income, not outlay with this one!
 

mooseberry

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
I just put a small dish of fancy chocolates in the rooms but do have a cheese platter in the fridge for anyone to help theirselfs.
Making them seperately for guests sounds like something I probably will start doing.
How about the pricing? Do you aske guest if they would like to purchase a cheesplatter or up and then include it in the roomrate?
 

Morticia

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
I just put a small dish of fancy chocolates in the rooms but do have a cheese platter in the fridge for anyone to help theirselfs.
Making them seperately for guests sounds like something I probably will start doing.
How about the pricing? Do you aske guest if they would like to purchase a cheesplatter or up and then include it in the roomrate?
.
I would consider it an add on if I did something like that. Have a list of things on your specials page (or under packages) where you have the cheese platter or the brekkie in bed. I would imagine you get folks in when restaurants are closed in your area. It might be worth your while to come up with a 'pic-a-nic basket' sort of thing with sandwiches, fruit, cookies, etc for late check-ins.
 

Penelope

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
MY OPINION is that it is too low of a price. It is a lot of food for the money and I would up it by at least another $5. But, it's not my call. There is the time to slice cheese, the time to wash and bundle grapes, the presentation setup of it...however, it works. It's poplular. People love it. They ask for it to be ready when they arrive and it's a nice bit of solid food to take the edge off. If it were me traveling, I would enjoy the option of it rather than a handful of chocolates, cookies, or chips.
 

Morticia

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
MY OPINION is that it is too low of a price. It is a lot of food for the money and I would up it by at least another $5. But, it's not my call. There is the time to slice cheese, the time to wash and bundle grapes, the presentation setup of it...however, it works. It's poplular. People love it. They ask for it to be ready when they arrive and it's a nice bit of solid food to take the edge off. If it were me traveling, I would enjoy the option of it rather than a handful of chocolates, cookies, or chips.
.
I think there is a point at which the price is 'just right'. In this biz where we, the owners, do all the work, there is no 'pay' for time spent on anything, so prep time is irrelevant in the scheme of how much to charge for something! I'm going to the store anyway, we go everyday, so no extra trip involved, no extra gas, no extra anything. (Different in your case. There HAS to be 'prep time' built into the cost.)
I think that price is about all that could be expected from a guest here. (I've seen prices elsewhere that floor me...$25 for 6 chocolate-dipped strawberries? You KNOW there's a chef somewhere on premises that's getting paid for that!)
I am cheap, most of my guests are 'frugal' and wouldn't pay more than that price for what they would essentially view as a 'couple of crackers and some cheese thrown on a plate.' (Notwithstanding the lovely presentation!) I would probably throw in some smoked salmon if I were to do this. (I love smoked salmon so it wouldn't go to waste.)
I think the price has to be based on 'perceived benefit'.
I'm surprised when someone picks the birthday package with a cake. And it happens more and more.
 

mooseberry

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
MY OPINION is that it is too low of a price. It is a lot of food for the money and I would up it by at least another $5. But, it's not my call. There is the time to slice cheese, the time to wash and bundle grapes, the presentation setup of it...however, it works. It's poplular. People love it. They ask for it to be ready when they arrive and it's a nice bit of solid food to take the edge off. If it were me traveling, I would enjoy the option of it rather than a handful of chocolates, cookies, or chips.
.
I think there is a point at which the price is 'just right'. In this biz where we, the owners, do all the work, there is no 'pay' for time spent on anything, so prep time is irrelevant in the scheme of how much to charge for something! I'm going to the store anyway, we go everyday, so no extra trip involved, no extra gas, no extra anything. (Different in your case. There HAS to be 'prep time' built into the cost.)
I think that price is about all that could be expected from a guest here. (I've seen prices elsewhere that floor me...$25 for 6 chocolate-dipped strawberries? You KNOW there's a chef somewhere on premises that's getting paid for that!)
I am cheap, most of my guests are 'frugal' and wouldn't pay more than that price for what they would essentially view as a 'couple of crackers and some cheese thrown on a plate.' (Notwithstanding the lovely presentation!) I would probably throw in some smoked salmon if I were to do this. (I love smoked salmon so it wouldn't go to waste.)
I think the price has to be based on 'perceived benefit'.
I'm surprised when someone picks the birthday package with a cake. And it happens more and more.
.
A Birthday package with a cake...I love to bake.....do you make the cake or buy it?
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
 

Penelope

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
MY OPINION is that it is too low of a price. It is a lot of food for the money and I would up it by at least another $5. But, it's not my call. There is the time to slice cheese, the time to wash and bundle grapes, the presentation setup of it...however, it works. It's poplular. People love it. They ask for it to be ready when they arrive and it's a nice bit of solid food to take the edge off. If it were me traveling, I would enjoy the option of it rather than a handful of chocolates, cookies, or chips.
.
I think there is a point at which the price is 'just right'. In this biz where we, the owners, do all the work, there is no 'pay' for time spent on anything, so prep time is irrelevant in the scheme of how much to charge for something! I'm going to the store anyway, we go everyday, so no extra trip involved, no extra gas, no extra anything. (Different in your case. There HAS to be 'prep time' built into the cost.)
I think that price is about all that could be expected from a guest here. (I've seen prices elsewhere that floor me...$25 for 6 chocolate-dipped strawberries? You KNOW there's a chef somewhere on premises that's getting paid for that!)
I am cheap, most of my guests are 'frugal' and wouldn't pay more than that price for what they would essentially view as a 'couple of crackers and some cheese thrown on a plate.' (Notwithstanding the lovely presentation!) I would probably throw in some smoked salmon if I were to do this. (I love smoked salmon so it wouldn't go to waste.)
I think the price has to be based on 'perceived benefit'.
I'm surprised when someone picks the birthday package with a cake. And it happens more and more.
.
A Birthday package with a cake...I love to bake.....do you make the cake or buy it?
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
.
Mooseberry Inn said:
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
TWO HUNDRED MILES!!!!???? That is incredible. How do you do it????
 

Morticia

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
MY OPINION is that it is too low of a price. It is a lot of food for the money and I would up it by at least another $5. But, it's not my call. There is the time to slice cheese, the time to wash and bundle grapes, the presentation setup of it...however, it works. It's poplular. People love it. They ask for it to be ready when they arrive and it's a nice bit of solid food to take the edge off. If it were me traveling, I would enjoy the option of it rather than a handful of chocolates, cookies, or chips.
.
I think there is a point at which the price is 'just right'. In this biz where we, the owners, do all the work, there is no 'pay' for time spent on anything, so prep time is irrelevant in the scheme of how much to charge for something! I'm going to the store anyway, we go everyday, so no extra trip involved, no extra gas, no extra anything. (Different in your case. There HAS to be 'prep time' built into the cost.)
I think that price is about all that could be expected from a guest here. (I've seen prices elsewhere that floor me...$25 for 6 chocolate-dipped strawberries? You KNOW there's a chef somewhere on premises that's getting paid for that!)
I am cheap, most of my guests are 'frugal' and wouldn't pay more than that price for what they would essentially view as a 'couple of crackers and some cheese thrown on a plate.' (Notwithstanding the lovely presentation!) I would probably throw in some smoked salmon if I were to do this. (I love smoked salmon so it wouldn't go to waste.)
I think the price has to be based on 'perceived benefit'.
I'm surprised when someone picks the birthday package with a cake. And it happens more and more.
.
A Birthday package with a cake...I love to bake.....do you make the cake or buy it?
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
.
I buy the cake. It's a mile to the grocery store...
 

mooseberry

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
MY OPINION is that it is too low of a price. It is a lot of food for the money and I would up it by at least another $5. But, it's not my call. There is the time to slice cheese, the time to wash and bundle grapes, the presentation setup of it...however, it works. It's poplular. People love it. They ask for it to be ready when they arrive and it's a nice bit of solid food to take the edge off. If it were me traveling, I would enjoy the option of it rather than a handful of chocolates, cookies, or chips.
.
I think there is a point at which the price is 'just right'. In this biz where we, the owners, do all the work, there is no 'pay' for time spent on anything, so prep time is irrelevant in the scheme of how much to charge for something! I'm going to the store anyway, we go everyday, so no extra trip involved, no extra gas, no extra anything. (Different in your case. There HAS to be 'prep time' built into the cost.)
I think that price is about all that could be expected from a guest here. (I've seen prices elsewhere that floor me...$25 for 6 chocolate-dipped strawberries? You KNOW there's a chef somewhere on premises that's getting paid for that!)
I am cheap, most of my guests are 'frugal' and wouldn't pay more than that price for what they would essentially view as a 'couple of crackers and some cheese thrown on a plate.' (Notwithstanding the lovely presentation!) I would probably throw in some smoked salmon if I were to do this. (I love smoked salmon so it wouldn't go to waste.)
I think the price has to be based on 'perceived benefit'.
I'm surprised when someone picks the birthday package with a cake. And it happens more and more.
.
A Birthday package with a cake...I love to bake.....do you make the cake or buy it?
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
.
Mooseberry Inn said:
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
TWO HUNDRED MILES!!!!???? That is incredible. How do you do it????
.
penelope said:
Mooseberry Inn said:
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
TWO HUNDRED MILES!!!!???? That is incredible. How do you do it????
Well, living in rural Alaska we just get used to it.
When we go to town (sometimes 4 times a month, relly, just a hop and a skip anymore,,,haha), we buy whetever we can in advance. The only think that bothers me are the fruits, they only fresh the day they come in the store locally, then they go bad in warp speed..I guess our store gets what the others didn't want.
It's not all that bad, we have no crime, it is quiet, everyone pretty much knows everyone and especially no taxes...none at all ( besides tobacco )
I do miss the conveniences from the city, but after 15 years of living here I learned to deal...
Take a look at http://www.tokalaskainfo.com/
 

egoodell

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We list our add ons on Webervations.
I charge $12 for 6 dipped strawberries. But I dip them in thick Belgian chocolate, not the store stuff. I get the big ones, and dip in white, dark and milk chocolate. One I add chocolate sprinkles, and one gets dusted wtih crushed walnuts.
I drizzle chocolate on a china plate and set them on it and add a couple of wet wipes and paper napkins and a little silver thingy (it was called a pastry server) to pry the strawberry off. They are popular and don't take long to make using the micro.
I sell an addicting locally made cheese ball with local crostini and crackers, a little cluster of grapes and a couple of strawberries on a wooden cheeseboard for $12. The cheese is purchased wholesale for $4 and we always have the fruit and crackers on-hand for the wine tours. Local gourmet stores sell the cheese for $9.
I just put the cheese and other stuff wrapped in plastic in their room the afternoon they are checking in. I understand cheese is to be served at room temperature.
We have little fridges in the rooms so they can put it in there if they want after they get here.
Riki
 

Samster

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
MY OPINION is that it is too low of a price. It is a lot of food for the money and I would up it by at least another $5. But, it's not my call. There is the time to slice cheese, the time to wash and bundle grapes, the presentation setup of it...however, it works. It's poplular. People love it. They ask for it to be ready when they arrive and it's a nice bit of solid food to take the edge off. If it were me traveling, I would enjoy the option of it rather than a handful of chocolates, cookies, or chips.
.
I think there is a point at which the price is 'just right'. In this biz where we, the owners, do all the work, there is no 'pay' for time spent on anything, so prep time is irrelevant in the scheme of how much to charge for something! I'm going to the store anyway, we go everyday, so no extra trip involved, no extra gas, no extra anything. (Different in your case. There HAS to be 'prep time' built into the cost.)
I think that price is about all that could be expected from a guest here. (I've seen prices elsewhere that floor me...$25 for 6 chocolate-dipped strawberries? You KNOW there's a chef somewhere on premises that's getting paid for that!)
I am cheap, most of my guests are 'frugal' and wouldn't pay more than that price for what they would essentially view as a 'couple of crackers and some cheese thrown on a plate.' (Notwithstanding the lovely presentation!) I would probably throw in some smoked salmon if I were to do this. (I love smoked salmon so it wouldn't go to waste.)
I think the price has to be based on 'perceived benefit'.
I'm surprised when someone picks the birthday package with a cake. And it happens more and more.
.
In a year, I've probably had the cheese & cracker tray ordered about 5 times. I charge $25 which is probably not enough. I have a crystal cracker server, then have 2 glass dome serving pieces I use. One will have hard cheese and the other might have sweeter and soft cheese. Garnished with seasonal fruits - usually grapes, a few strawberries, maybe apples. I buy gourmet cheese & make $7-10 depending on how good the sale price is on the cheese. :)
 

Samster

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We list our add ons on Webervations.
I charge $12 for 6 dipped strawberries. But I dip them in thick Belgian chocolate, not the store stuff. I get the big ones, and dip in white, dark and milk chocolate. One I add chocolate sprinkles, and one gets dusted wtih crushed walnuts.
I drizzle chocolate on a china plate and set them on it and add a couple of wet wipes and paper napkins and a little silver thingy (it was called a pastry server) to pry the strawberry off. They are popular and don't take long to make using the micro.
I sell an addicting locally made cheese ball with local crostini and crackers, a little cluster of grapes and a couple of strawberries on a wooden cheeseboard for $12. The cheese is purchased wholesale for $4 and we always have the fruit and crackers on-hand for the wine tours. Local gourmet stores sell the cheese for $9.
I just put the cheese and other stuff wrapped in plastic in their room the afternoon they are checking in. I understand cheese is to be served at room temperature.
We have little fridges in the rooms so they can put it in there if they want after they get here.
Riki.
I serve 6-8 chocolate dipped strawberries for $15 - plated, nice presentation, blah, blah, blah. Our local grocery sells them for $12/lb which is about 12 very small ones. I've been wanting to try them just to see how they are compared to mine :)
 

Penelope

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
MY OPINION is that it is too low of a price. It is a lot of food for the money and I would up it by at least another $5. But, it's not my call. There is the time to slice cheese, the time to wash and bundle grapes, the presentation setup of it...however, it works. It's poplular. People love it. They ask for it to be ready when they arrive and it's a nice bit of solid food to take the edge off. If it were me traveling, I would enjoy the option of it rather than a handful of chocolates, cookies, or chips.
.
I think there is a point at which the price is 'just right'. In this biz where we, the owners, do all the work, there is no 'pay' for time spent on anything, so prep time is irrelevant in the scheme of how much to charge for something! I'm going to the store anyway, we go everyday, so no extra trip involved, no extra gas, no extra anything. (Different in your case. There HAS to be 'prep time' built into the cost.)
I think that price is about all that could be expected from a guest here. (I've seen prices elsewhere that floor me...$25 for 6 chocolate-dipped strawberries? You KNOW there's a chef somewhere on premises that's getting paid for that!)
I am cheap, most of my guests are 'frugal' and wouldn't pay more than that price for what they would essentially view as a 'couple of crackers and some cheese thrown on a plate.' (Notwithstanding the lovely presentation!) I would probably throw in some smoked salmon if I were to do this. (I love smoked salmon so it wouldn't go to waste.)
I think the price has to be based on 'perceived benefit'.
I'm surprised when someone picks the birthday package with a cake. And it happens more and more.
.
A Birthday package with a cake...I love to bake.....do you make the cake or buy it?
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
.
Mooseberry Inn said:
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
TWO HUNDRED MILES!!!!???? That is incredible. How do you do it????
.
penelope said:
Mooseberry Inn said:
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
TWO HUNDRED MILES!!!!???? That is incredible. How do you do it????
Well, living in rural Alaska we just get used to it.
When we go to town (sometimes 4 times a month, relly, just a hop and a skip anymore,,,haha), we buy whetever we can in advance. The only think that bothers me are the fruits, they only fresh the day they come in the store locally, then they go bad in warp speed..I guess our store gets what the others didn't want.
It's not all that bad, we have no crime, it is quiet, everyone pretty much knows everyone and especially no taxes...none at all ( besides tobacco )
I do miss the conveniences from the city, but after 15 years of living here I learned to deal...
Take a look at http://www.tokalaskainfo.com/
.
I am in love with your area. How did you ever get to live there? It says your hubby is from upstate NY. What took you to Alaksa?
 

Morticia

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
MY OPINION is that it is too low of a price. It is a lot of food for the money and I would up it by at least another $5. But, it's not my call. There is the time to slice cheese, the time to wash and bundle grapes, the presentation setup of it...however, it works. It's poplular. People love it. They ask for it to be ready when they arrive and it's a nice bit of solid food to take the edge off. If it were me traveling, I would enjoy the option of it rather than a handful of chocolates, cookies, or chips.
.
I think there is a point at which the price is 'just right'. In this biz where we, the owners, do all the work, there is no 'pay' for time spent on anything, so prep time is irrelevant in the scheme of how much to charge for something! I'm going to the store anyway, we go everyday, so no extra trip involved, no extra gas, no extra anything. (Different in your case. There HAS to be 'prep time' built into the cost.)
I think that price is about all that could be expected from a guest here. (I've seen prices elsewhere that floor me...$25 for 6 chocolate-dipped strawberries? You KNOW there's a chef somewhere on premises that's getting paid for that!)
I am cheap, most of my guests are 'frugal' and wouldn't pay more than that price for what they would essentially view as a 'couple of crackers and some cheese thrown on a plate.' (Notwithstanding the lovely presentation!) I would probably throw in some smoked salmon if I were to do this. (I love smoked salmon so it wouldn't go to waste.)
I think the price has to be based on 'perceived benefit'.
I'm surprised when someone picks the birthday package with a cake. And it happens more and more.
.
A Birthday package with a cake...I love to bake.....do you make the cake or buy it?
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
.
Mooseberry Inn said:
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
TWO HUNDRED MILES!!!!???? That is incredible. How do you do it????
.
penelope said:
Mooseberry Inn said:
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
TWO HUNDRED MILES!!!!???? That is incredible. How do you do it????
Well, living in rural Alaska we just get used to it.
When we go to town (sometimes 4 times a month, relly, just a hop and a skip anymore,,,haha), we buy whetever we can in advance. The only think that bothers me are the fruits, they only fresh the day they come in the store locally, then they go bad in warp speed..I guess our store gets what the others didn't want.
It's not all that bad, we have no crime, it is quiet, everyone pretty much knows everyone and especially no taxes...none at all ( besides tobacco )
I do miss the conveniences from the city, but after 15 years of living here I learned to deal...
Take a look at http://www.tokalaskainfo.com/
.
Where in upstate NY is your husband from? There are a few NYers here!
 

mooseberry

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We do a fruit and cheese platter. It's a few different types of cheeses (monty jack, cheddar, pepper jack...whatever we have on hand), a few bundles of grapes, two apples, two strawberries, a small dish of pickles, small dish of baby carrots, handful of crackers (or so), and two of our Inn cookies. Cover it with saran wrap, put it in the fridge until they arrive. When they arrive, we check them in and ask them what time they would like it delivered. Viola...or as JBJ would say "and bob's yer uncle". ;)
ETA: Living in Amish country, it's a BIG draw for us to use homemade Amish cheeses. My boss keeps a stock of them on hand for the platters, but sometimes, it's just Cabot cheese or Kraft cheese ( ssshhhh :) ).
So if it's looking to be a late arrival, how would you handle the timing on that?
And I just looked up the price...that seems reasonable to me. Have you found any issues with the pricing? Complaints it's too high or feeling like it isn't enough from the innkeeper's side?
.
MY OPINION is that it is too low of a price. It is a lot of food for the money and I would up it by at least another $5. But, it's not my call. There is the time to slice cheese, the time to wash and bundle grapes, the presentation setup of it...however, it works. It's poplular. People love it. They ask for it to be ready when they arrive and it's a nice bit of solid food to take the edge off. If it were me traveling, I would enjoy the option of it rather than a handful of chocolates, cookies, or chips.
.
I think there is a point at which the price is 'just right'. In this biz where we, the owners, do all the work, there is no 'pay' for time spent on anything, so prep time is irrelevant in the scheme of how much to charge for something! I'm going to the store anyway, we go everyday, so no extra trip involved, no extra gas, no extra anything. (Different in your case. There HAS to be 'prep time' built into the cost.)
I think that price is about all that could be expected from a guest here. (I've seen prices elsewhere that floor me...$25 for 6 chocolate-dipped strawberries? You KNOW there's a chef somewhere on premises that's getting paid for that!)
I am cheap, most of my guests are 'frugal' and wouldn't pay more than that price for what they would essentially view as a 'couple of crackers and some cheese thrown on a plate.' (Notwithstanding the lovely presentation!) I would probably throw in some smoked salmon if I were to do this. (I love smoked salmon so it wouldn't go to waste.)
I think the price has to be based on 'perceived benefit'.
I'm surprised when someone picks the birthday package with a cake. And it happens more and more.
.
A Birthday package with a cake...I love to bake.....do you make the cake or buy it?
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
.
Mooseberry Inn said:
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
TWO HUNDRED MILES!!!!???? That is incredible. How do you do it????
.
penelope said:
Mooseberry Inn said:
We live pretty rural, 200 miles to the closest Safeway, Kroger, etc....our local store has not much to offer, so we have to be creative.....
TWO HUNDRED MILES!!!!???? That is incredible. How do you do it????
Well, living in rural Alaska we just get used to it.
When we go to town (sometimes 4 times a month, relly, just a hop and a skip anymore,,,haha), we buy whetever we can in advance. The only think that bothers me are the fruits, they only fresh the day they come in the store locally, then they go bad in warp speed..I guess our store gets what the others didn't want.
It's not all that bad, we have no crime, it is quiet, everyone pretty much knows everyone and especially no taxes...none at all ( besides tobacco )
I do miss the conveniences from the city, but after 15 years of living here I learned to deal...
Take a look at http://www.tokalaskainfo.com/
.
Where in upstate NY is your husband from? There are a few NYers here!
.
Bree said:
Where in upstate NY is your husband from? There are a few NYers here!
Speculator, Lake Pleasant it's about an hour drive from Gloversville/Johnstown
 
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