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Morticia

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Congrats to one of our members for being mentioned in the iloveinns email today!
 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

Well-known member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
3,893
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Here is most of the mailing:
Inn This Edition:
  • Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
  • Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
  • Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
Please have your guests go to your listing on iloveinns.com and make reviews. This will give you Hearts! as you see on the Carlisle House example! Just send them a link to your listing 5-7 days after they return home from their visit. Watch next Marketing Tips for more ways inns are getting great reviews.
Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
Travelers today aren’t interested in ‘look but don’t touch’ experiences – they want to have an authentic experience that makes true lifelong memories. Inns and B&Bs are perfectly in tune with that need – isn’t that what sets us apart from the hotel chains in the first place?
Amp up your uniquessness and give your guests a true sense of place.
Shellie Leete at The Claiborne House B&B in Rocky Mount, Virginia, promotes the authentic experience of a small town stay. To market this town located at the start of the Crooked Road (Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail) the inn has background music everywhere and asks on it's website, "Do you have Nature Deficit Disorder?"
Even before guests get to the inn, they can access a page on Shellie's web site devoted to local music events, with definitions to help out those new to heritage music, links to audio clips from local musicians, and slide shows of the sights along the Crooked Road.
Her promotion of her local area doesn’t stop with the music – she lists restaurants, historic sites and nature walks and her blog highlights an up-to-date schedule of events from book-signings to fun events for the family, like Antique Farm Tractor days. When she takes phone reservations she makes sure to [FONT= &quot]mention events that are happening[/FONT] during the guests’ stay to help them in their planning (and to decide to stay longer.)
Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
A simple idea with big results. As many bed and breakfasts struggle to attract more guests during these economically challenging times, some innkeepers have taken to controversial methods to keep their business strong. Here, the method - lowering rates - worked well for this inn in a somewhat off-the-beaten-track area.
Cynthia Knauss, an innkeeper for 20 years, said the major secret to her success was when she focused on what was important – [FONT= &quot]filling her rooms[/FONT] at the Country Inn in Ft. Bragg, California. Three years ago she lowered her rates and made them more reasonable. This simple act gave her a $20K revenue increase for last year and already this year she has a $21K increase in revenues in the first 4 months alone!
In addition, she offers a mid-week special of $65 per night, with a two-night minimum. This fills her rooms during the week and the only concession she made was to not offer the afternoon wine and refreshments mid week. Everything else, from amenities to a full breakfast is the same, "no matter what room rate you pay or which night you stay." Word spread like wildfire! Her occupancy is up 40% for the first quarter of 2008.
This may be most effective for inns in beautiful little towns that are just a bit off the beaten path. Fort Bragg is 8 miles from Mendocino, a well-known destination. The rate motivates the extra driving and makes people excited about their discovery, which again drives word of mouth.
 

swirt

Forum founder. Former Owner.
Joined
May 17, 2008
Messages
3,210
Reaction score
0
Here is most of the mailing:
Inn This Edition:
  • Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
  • Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
  • Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
Please have your guests go to your listing on iloveinns.com and make reviews. This will give you Hearts! as you see on the Carlisle House example! Just send them a link to your listing 5-7 days after they return home from their visit. Watch next Marketing Tips for more ways inns are getting great reviews.
Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
Travelers today aren’t interested in ‘look but don’t touch’ experiences – they want to have an authentic experience that makes true lifelong memories. Inns and B&Bs are perfectly in tune with that need – isn’t that what sets us apart from the hotel chains in the first place?
Amp up your uniquessness and give your guests a true sense of place.
Shellie Leete at The Claiborne House B&B in Rocky Mount, Virginia, promotes the authentic experience of a small town stay. To market this town located at the start of the Crooked Road (Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail) the inn has background music everywhere and asks on it's website, "Do you have Nature Deficit Disorder?"
Even before guests get to the inn, they can access a page on Shellie's web site devoted to local music events, with definitions to help out those new to heritage music, links to audio clips from local musicians, and slide shows of the sights along the Crooked Road.
Her promotion of her local area doesn’t stop with the music – she lists restaurants, historic sites and nature walks and her blog highlights an up-to-date schedule of events from book-signings to fun events for the family, like Antique Farm Tractor days. When she takes phone reservations she makes sure to [FONT= &quot]mention events that are happening[/FONT] during the guests’ stay to help them in their planning (and to decide to stay longer.)
Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
A simple idea with big results. As many bed and breakfasts struggle to attract more guests during these economically challenging times, some innkeepers have taken to controversial methods to keep their business strong. Here, the method - lowering rates - worked well for this inn in a somewhat off-the-beaten-track area.
Cynthia Knauss, an innkeeper for 20 years, said the major secret to her success was when she focused on what was important – [FONT= &quot]filling her rooms[/FONT] at the Country Inn in Ft. Bragg, California. Three years ago she lowered her rates and made them more reasonable. This simple act gave her a $20K revenue increase for last year and already this year she has a $21K increase in revenues in the first 4 months alone!
In addition, she offers a mid-week special of $65 per night, with a two-night minimum. This fills her rooms during the week and the only concession she made was to not offer the afternoon wine and refreshments mid week. Everything else, from amenities to a full breakfast is the same, "no matter what room rate you pay or which night you stay." Word spread like wildfire! Her occupancy is up 40% for the first quarter of 2008.
This may be most effective for inns in beautiful little towns that are just a bit off the beaten path. Fort Bragg is 8 miles from Mendocino, a well-known destination. The rate motivates the extra driving and makes people excited about their discovery, which again drives word of mouth. .
Cool. I didn't know Cynthia Knauss was on our forum.

 

EmptyNest

Well-known member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
8,741
Reaction score
1
Here is most of the mailing:
Inn This Edition:
  • Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
  • Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
  • Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
Please have your guests go to your listing on iloveinns.com and make reviews. This will give you Hearts! as you see on the Carlisle House example! Just send them a link to your listing 5-7 days after they return home from their visit. Watch next Marketing Tips for more ways inns are getting great reviews.
Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
Travelers today aren’t interested in ‘look but don’t touch’ experiences – they want to have an authentic experience that makes true lifelong memories. Inns and B&Bs are perfectly in tune with that need – isn’t that what sets us apart from the hotel chains in the first place?
Amp up your uniquessness and give your guests a true sense of place.
Shellie Leete at The Claiborne House B&B in Rocky Mount, Virginia, promotes the authentic experience of a small town stay. To market this town located at the start of the Crooked Road (Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail) the inn has background music everywhere and asks on it's website, "Do you have Nature Deficit Disorder?"
Even before guests get to the inn, they can access a page on Shellie's web site devoted to local music events, with definitions to help out those new to heritage music, links to audio clips from local musicians, and slide shows of the sights along the Crooked Road.
Her promotion of her local area doesn’t stop with the music – she lists restaurants, historic sites and nature walks and her blog highlights an up-to-date schedule of events from book-signings to fun events for the family, like Antique Farm Tractor days. When she takes phone reservations she makes sure to [FONT= &quot]mention events that are happening[/FONT] during the guests’ stay to help them in their planning (and to decide to stay longer.)
Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
A simple idea with big results. As many bed and breakfasts struggle to attract more guests during these economically challenging times, some innkeepers have taken to controversial methods to keep their business strong. Here, the method - lowering rates - worked well for this inn in a somewhat off-the-beaten-track area.
Cynthia Knauss, an innkeeper for 20 years, said the major secret to her success was when she focused on what was important – [FONT= &quot]filling her rooms[/FONT] at the Country Inn in Ft. Bragg, California. Three years ago she lowered her rates and made them more reasonable. This simple act gave her a $20K revenue increase for last year and already this year she has a $21K increase in revenues in the first 4 months alone!
In addition, she offers a mid-week special of $65 per night, with a two-night minimum. This fills her rooms during the week and the only concession she made was to not offer the afternoon wine and refreshments mid week. Everything else, from amenities to a full breakfast is the same, "no matter what room rate you pay or which night you stay." Word spread like wildfire! Her occupancy is up 40% for the first quarter of 2008.
This may be most effective for inns in beautiful little towns that are just a bit off the beaten path. Fort Bragg is 8 miles from Mendocino, a well-known destination. The rate motivates the extra driving and makes people excited about their discovery, which again drives word of mouth. .
Cool. I didn't know Cynthia Knauss was on our forum.

.
HEY COOL!!! I recognize that person!!!

 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Here is most of the mailing:
Inn This Edition:
  • Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
  • Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
  • Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
Please have your guests go to your listing on iloveinns.com and make reviews. This will give you Hearts! as you see on the Carlisle House example! Just send them a link to your listing 5-7 days after they return home from their visit. Watch next Marketing Tips for more ways inns are getting great reviews.
Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
Travelers today aren’t interested in ‘look but don’t touch’ experiences – they want to have an authentic experience that makes true lifelong memories. Inns and B&Bs are perfectly in tune with that need – isn’t that what sets us apart from the hotel chains in the first place?
Amp up your uniquessness and give your guests a true sense of place.
Shellie Leete at The Claiborne House B&B in Rocky Mount, Virginia, promotes the authentic experience of a small town stay. To market this town located at the start of the Crooked Road (Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail) the inn has background music everywhere and asks on it's website, "Do you have Nature Deficit Disorder?"
Even before guests get to the inn, they can access a page on Shellie's web site devoted to local music events, with definitions to help out those new to heritage music, links to audio clips from local musicians, and slide shows of the sights along the Crooked Road.
Her promotion of her local area doesn’t stop with the music – she lists restaurants, historic sites and nature walks and her blog highlights an up-to-date schedule of events from book-signings to fun events for the family, like Antique Farm Tractor days. When she takes phone reservations she makes sure to [FONT= &quot]mention events that are happening[/FONT] during the guests’ stay to help them in their planning (and to decide to stay longer.)
Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
A simple idea with big results. As many bed and breakfasts struggle to attract more guests during these economically challenging times, some innkeepers have taken to controversial methods to keep their business strong. Here, the method - lowering rates - worked well for this inn in a somewhat off-the-beaten-track area.
Cynthia Knauss, an innkeeper for 20 years, said the major secret to her success was when she focused on what was important – [FONT= &quot]filling her rooms[/FONT] at the Country Inn in Ft. Bragg, California. Three years ago she lowered her rates and made them more reasonable. This simple act gave her a $20K revenue increase for last year and already this year she has a $21K increase in revenues in the first 4 months alone!
In addition, she offers a mid-week special of $65 per night, with a two-night minimum. This fills her rooms during the week and the only concession she made was to not offer the afternoon wine and refreshments mid week. Everything else, from amenities to a full breakfast is the same, "no matter what room rate you pay or which night you stay." Word spread like wildfire! Her occupancy is up 40% for the first quarter of 2008.
This may be most effective for inns in beautiful little towns that are just a bit off the beaten path. Fort Bragg is 8 miles from Mendocino, a well-known destination. The rate motivates the extra driving and makes people excited about their discovery, which again drives word of mouth. .
Now that it's been posted, what do you think of the innkeeper who reduced rates THAT much?
Here, rates like that are associated with places that allow smoking and really low rent motels. And, as we have found, we don't get any more business than the places that charge $20 more and up per night.
 

swirt

Forum founder. Former Owner.
Joined
May 17, 2008
Messages
3,210
Reaction score
0
Here is most of the mailing:
Inn This Edition:
  • Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
  • Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
  • Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
Please have your guests go to your listing on iloveinns.com and make reviews. This will give you Hearts! as you see on the Carlisle House example! Just send them a link to your listing 5-7 days after they return home from their visit. Watch next Marketing Tips for more ways inns are getting great reviews.
Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
Travelers today aren’t interested in ‘look but don’t touch’ experiences – they want to have an authentic experience that makes true lifelong memories. Inns and B&Bs are perfectly in tune with that need – isn’t that what sets us apart from the hotel chains in the first place?
Amp up your uniquessness and give your guests a true sense of place.
Shellie Leete at The Claiborne House B&B in Rocky Mount, Virginia, promotes the authentic experience of a small town stay. To market this town located at the start of the Crooked Road (Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail) the inn has background music everywhere and asks on it's website, "Do you have Nature Deficit Disorder?"
Even before guests get to the inn, they can access a page on Shellie's web site devoted to local music events, with definitions to help out those new to heritage music, links to audio clips from local musicians, and slide shows of the sights along the Crooked Road.
Her promotion of her local area doesn’t stop with the music – she lists restaurants, historic sites and nature walks and her blog highlights an up-to-date schedule of events from book-signings to fun events for the family, like Antique Farm Tractor days. When she takes phone reservations she makes sure to [FONT= &quot]mention events that are happening[/FONT] during the guests’ stay to help them in their planning (and to decide to stay longer.)
Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
A simple idea with big results. As many bed and breakfasts struggle to attract more guests during these economically challenging times, some innkeepers have taken to controversial methods to keep their business strong. Here, the method - lowering rates - worked well for this inn in a somewhat off-the-beaten-track area.
Cynthia Knauss, an innkeeper for 20 years, said the major secret to her success was when she focused on what was important – [FONT= &quot]filling her rooms[/FONT] at the Country Inn in Ft. Bragg, California. Three years ago she lowered her rates and made them more reasonable. This simple act gave her a $20K revenue increase for last year and already this year she has a $21K increase in revenues in the first 4 months alone!
In addition, she offers a mid-week special of $65 per night, with a two-night minimum. This fills her rooms during the week and the only concession she made was to not offer the afternoon wine and refreshments mid week. Everything else, from amenities to a full breakfast is the same, "no matter what room rate you pay or which night you stay." Word spread like wildfire! Her occupancy is up 40% for the first quarter of 2008.
This may be most effective for inns in beautiful little towns that are just a bit off the beaten path. Fort Bragg is 8 miles from Mendocino, a well-known destination. The rate motivates the extra driving and makes people excited about their discovery, which again drives word of mouth. .
Now that it's been posted, what do you think of the innkeeper who reduced rates THAT much?
Here, rates like that are associated with places that allow smoking and really low rent motels. And, as we have found, we don't get any more business than the places that charge $20 more and up per night.
.
I think every area has things that work and things that won't. I wouldn't suggest it here in a seasonal tourist area, but someplace else I could see it working. Of course I am leary of statements like "boosting revenue by $20K" because it doesn't say what it did to her expenses or what it meant in terms of net. I could drop my rates to $40 a night and my revenue would increase, but my expenses would crush me.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Here is most of the mailing:
Inn This Edition:
  • Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
  • Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
  • Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
Please have your guests go to your listing on iloveinns.com and make reviews. This will give you Hearts! as you see on the Carlisle House example! Just send them a link to your listing 5-7 days after they return home from their visit. Watch next Marketing Tips for more ways inns are getting great reviews.
Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
Travelers today aren’t interested in ‘look but don’t touch’ experiences – they want to have an authentic experience that makes true lifelong memories. Inns and B&Bs are perfectly in tune with that need – isn’t that what sets us apart from the hotel chains in the first place?
Amp up your uniquessness and give your guests a true sense of place.
Shellie Leete at The Claiborne House B&B in Rocky Mount, Virginia, promotes the authentic experience of a small town stay. To market this town located at the start of the Crooked Road (Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail) the inn has background music everywhere and asks on it's website, "Do you have Nature Deficit Disorder?"
Even before guests get to the inn, they can access a page on Shellie's web site devoted to local music events, with definitions to help out those new to heritage music, links to audio clips from local musicians, and slide shows of the sights along the Crooked Road.
Her promotion of her local area doesn’t stop with the music – she lists restaurants, historic sites and nature walks and her blog highlights an up-to-date schedule of events from book-signings to fun events for the family, like Antique Farm Tractor days. When she takes phone reservations she makes sure to [FONT= &quot]mention events that are happening[/FONT] during the guests’ stay to help them in their planning (and to decide to stay longer.)
Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
A simple idea with big results. As many bed and breakfasts struggle to attract more guests during these economically challenging times, some innkeepers have taken to controversial methods to keep their business strong. Here, the method - lowering rates - worked well for this inn in a somewhat off-the-beaten-track area.
Cynthia Knauss, an innkeeper for 20 years, said the major secret to her success was when she focused on what was important – [FONT= &quot]filling her rooms[/FONT] at the Country Inn in Ft. Bragg, California. Three years ago she lowered her rates and made them more reasonable. This simple act gave her a $20K revenue increase for last year and already this year she has a $21K increase in revenues in the first 4 months alone!
In addition, she offers a mid-week special of $65 per night, with a two-night minimum. This fills her rooms during the week and the only concession she made was to not offer the afternoon wine and refreshments mid week. Everything else, from amenities to a full breakfast is the same, "no matter what room rate you pay or which night you stay." Word spread like wildfire! Her occupancy is up 40% for the first quarter of 2008.
This may be most effective for inns in beautiful little towns that are just a bit off the beaten path. Fort Bragg is 8 miles from Mendocino, a well-known destination. The rate motivates the extra driving and makes people excited about their discovery, which again drives word of mouth. .
Now that it's been posted, what do you think of the innkeeper who reduced rates THAT much?
Here, rates like that are associated with places that allow smoking and really low rent motels. And, as we have found, we don't get any more business than the places that charge $20 more and up per night.
.
I think every area has things that work and things that won't. I wouldn't suggest it here in a seasonal tourist area, but someplace else I could see it working. Of course I am leary of statements like "boosting revenue by $20K" because it doesn't say what it did to her expenses or what it meant in terms of net. I could drop my rates to $40 a night and my revenue would increase, but my expenses would crush me.
.
Right. I could charge $100/night in the winter to bring in biz, but could I afford to heat the house?
BTW, I think my daughter has found her house. It's on Lake St. I looked at the video tour last night, and it looks pretty nice. The prices are thru the roof, tho. I don't know how people afford those mortgages.
 

swirt

Forum founder. Former Owner.
Joined
May 17, 2008
Messages
3,210
Reaction score
0
Here is most of the mailing:
Inn This Edition:
  • Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
  • Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
  • Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
Please have your guests go to your listing on iloveinns.com and make reviews. This will give you Hearts! as you see on the Carlisle House example! Just send them a link to your listing 5-7 days after they return home from their visit. Watch next Marketing Tips for more ways inns are getting great reviews.
Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
Travelers today aren’t interested in ‘look but don’t touch’ experiences – they want to have an authentic experience that makes true lifelong memories. Inns and B&Bs are perfectly in tune with that need – isn’t that what sets us apart from the hotel chains in the first place?
Amp up your uniquessness and give your guests a true sense of place.
Shellie Leete at The Claiborne House B&B in Rocky Mount, Virginia, promotes the authentic experience of a small town stay. To market this town located at the start of the Crooked Road (Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail) the inn has background music everywhere and asks on it's website, "Do you have Nature Deficit Disorder?"
Even before guests get to the inn, they can access a page on Shellie's web site devoted to local music events, with definitions to help out those new to heritage music, links to audio clips from local musicians, and slide shows of the sights along the Crooked Road.
Her promotion of her local area doesn’t stop with the music – she lists restaurants, historic sites and nature walks and her blog highlights an up-to-date schedule of events from book-signings to fun events for the family, like Antique Farm Tractor days. When she takes phone reservations she makes sure to [FONT= &quot]mention events that are happening[/FONT] during the guests’ stay to help them in their planning (and to decide to stay longer.)
Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
A simple idea with big results. As many bed and breakfasts struggle to attract more guests during these economically challenging times, some innkeepers have taken to controversial methods to keep their business strong. Here, the method - lowering rates - worked well for this inn in a somewhat off-the-beaten-track area.
Cynthia Knauss, an innkeeper for 20 years, said the major secret to her success was when she focused on what was important – [FONT= &quot]filling her rooms[/FONT] at the Country Inn in Ft. Bragg, California. Three years ago she lowered her rates and made them more reasonable. This simple act gave her a $20K revenue increase for last year and already this year she has a $21K increase in revenues in the first 4 months alone!
In addition, she offers a mid-week special of $65 per night, with a two-night minimum. This fills her rooms during the week and the only concession she made was to not offer the afternoon wine and refreshments mid week. Everything else, from amenities to a full breakfast is the same, "no matter what room rate you pay or which night you stay." Word spread like wildfire! Her occupancy is up 40% for the first quarter of 2008.
This may be most effective for inns in beautiful little towns that are just a bit off the beaten path. Fort Bragg is 8 miles from Mendocino, a well-known destination. The rate motivates the extra driving and makes people excited about their discovery, which again drives word of mouth. .
Now that it's been posted, what do you think of the innkeeper who reduced rates THAT much?
Here, rates like that are associated with places that allow smoking and really low rent motels. And, as we have found, we don't get any more business than the places that charge $20 more and up per night.
.
I think every area has things that work and things that won't. I wouldn't suggest it here in a seasonal tourist area, but someplace else I could see it working. Of course I am leary of statements like "boosting revenue by $20K" because it doesn't say what it did to her expenses or what it meant in terms of net. I could drop my rates to $40 a night and my revenue would increase, but my expenses would crush me.
.
Right. I could charge $100/night in the winter to bring in biz, but could I afford to heat the house?
BTW, I think my daughter has found her house. It's on Lake St. I looked at the video tour last night, and it looks pretty nice. The prices are thru the roof, tho. I don't know how people afford those mortgages.
.
That lake is probably the highest of all...pretty Ritzy area. Lake St runs on both sides of the lake....is it on E or W?
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Here is most of the mailing:
Inn This Edition:
  • Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
  • Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
  • Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
Please have your guests go to your listing on iloveinns.com and make reviews. This will give you Hearts! as you see on the Carlisle House example! Just send them a link to your listing 5-7 days after they return home from their visit. Watch next Marketing Tips for more ways inns are getting great reviews.
Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
Travelers today aren’t interested in ‘look but don’t touch’ experiences – they want to have an authentic experience that makes true lifelong memories. Inns and B&Bs are perfectly in tune with that need – isn’t that what sets us apart from the hotel chains in the first place?
Amp up your uniquessness and give your guests a true sense of place.
Shellie Leete at The Claiborne House B&B in Rocky Mount, Virginia, promotes the authentic experience of a small town stay. To market this town located at the start of the Crooked Road (Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail) the inn has background music everywhere and asks on it's website, "Do you have Nature Deficit Disorder?"
Even before guests get to the inn, they can access a page on Shellie's web site devoted to local music events, with definitions to help out those new to heritage music, links to audio clips from local musicians, and slide shows of the sights along the Crooked Road.
Her promotion of her local area doesn’t stop with the music – she lists restaurants, historic sites and nature walks and her blog highlights an up-to-date schedule of events from book-signings to fun events for the family, like Antique Farm Tractor days. When she takes phone reservations she makes sure to [FONT= &quot]mention events that are happening[/FONT] during the guests’ stay to help them in their planning (and to decide to stay longer.)
Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
A simple idea with big results. As many bed and breakfasts struggle to attract more guests during these economically challenging times, some innkeepers have taken to controversial methods to keep their business strong. Here, the method - lowering rates - worked well for this inn in a somewhat off-the-beaten-track area.
Cynthia Knauss, an innkeeper for 20 years, said the major secret to her success was when she focused on what was important – [FONT= &quot]filling her rooms[/FONT] at the Country Inn in Ft. Bragg, California. Three years ago she lowered her rates and made them more reasonable. This simple act gave her a $20K revenue increase for last year and already this year she has a $21K increase in revenues in the first 4 months alone!
In addition, she offers a mid-week special of $65 per night, with a two-night minimum. This fills her rooms during the week and the only concession she made was to not offer the afternoon wine and refreshments mid week. Everything else, from amenities to a full breakfast is the same, "no matter what room rate you pay or which night you stay." Word spread like wildfire! Her occupancy is up 40% for the first quarter of 2008.
This may be most effective for inns in beautiful little towns that are just a bit off the beaten path. Fort Bragg is 8 miles from Mendocino, a well-known destination. The rate motivates the extra driving and makes people excited about their discovery, which again drives word of mouth. .
Now that it's been posted, what do you think of the innkeeper who reduced rates THAT much?
Here, rates like that are associated with places that allow smoking and really low rent motels. And, as we have found, we don't get any more business than the places that charge $20 more and up per night.
.
I think every area has things that work and things that won't. I wouldn't suggest it here in a seasonal tourist area, but someplace else I could see it working. Of course I am leary of statements like "boosting revenue by $20K" because it doesn't say what it did to her expenses or what it meant in terms of net. I could drop my rates to $40 a night and my revenue would increase, but my expenses would crush me.
.
Right. I could charge $100/night in the winter to bring in biz, but could I afford to heat the house?
BTW, I think my daughter has found her house. It's on Lake St. I looked at the video tour last night, and it looks pretty nice. The prices are thru the roof, tho. I don't know how people afford those mortgages.
.
That lake is probably the highest of all...pretty Ritzy area. Lake St runs on both sides of the lake....is it on E or W?
.
I don't know. The map didn't show east or west. Eastern shore higher because of the sunset views?
 

swirt

Forum founder. Former Owner.
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Here is most of the mailing:
Inn This Edition:
  • Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
  • Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
  • Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
Please have your guests go to your listing on iloveinns.com and make reviews. This will give you Hearts! as you see on the Carlisle House example! Just send them a link to your listing 5-7 days after they return home from their visit. Watch next Marketing Tips for more ways inns are getting great reviews.
Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
Travelers today aren’t interested in ‘look but don’t touch’ experiences – they want to have an authentic experience that makes true lifelong memories. Inns and B&Bs are perfectly in tune with that need – isn’t that what sets us apart from the hotel chains in the first place?
Amp up your uniquessness and give your guests a true sense of place.
Shellie Leete at The Claiborne House B&B in Rocky Mount, Virginia, promotes the authentic experience of a small town stay. To market this town located at the start of the Crooked Road (Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail) the inn has background music everywhere and asks on it's website, "Do you have Nature Deficit Disorder?"
Even before guests get to the inn, they can access a page on Shellie's web site devoted to local music events, with definitions to help out those new to heritage music, links to audio clips from local musicians, and slide shows of the sights along the Crooked Road.
Her promotion of her local area doesn’t stop with the music – she lists restaurants, historic sites and nature walks and her blog highlights an up-to-date schedule of events from book-signings to fun events for the family, like Antique Farm Tractor days. When she takes phone reservations she makes sure to [FONT= &quot]mention events that are happening[/FONT] during the guests’ stay to help them in their planning (and to decide to stay longer.)
Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
A simple idea with big results. As many bed and breakfasts struggle to attract more guests during these economically challenging times, some innkeepers have taken to controversial methods to keep their business strong. Here, the method - lowering rates - worked well for this inn in a somewhat off-the-beaten-track area.
Cynthia Knauss, an innkeeper for 20 years, said the major secret to her success was when she focused on what was important – [FONT= &quot]filling her rooms[/FONT] at the Country Inn in Ft. Bragg, California. Three years ago she lowered her rates and made them more reasonable. This simple act gave her a $20K revenue increase for last year and already this year she has a $21K increase in revenues in the first 4 months alone!
In addition, she offers a mid-week special of $65 per night, with a two-night minimum. This fills her rooms during the week and the only concession she made was to not offer the afternoon wine and refreshments mid week. Everything else, from amenities to a full breakfast is the same, "no matter what room rate you pay or which night you stay." Word spread like wildfire! Her occupancy is up 40% for the first quarter of 2008.
This may be most effective for inns in beautiful little towns that are just a bit off the beaten path. Fort Bragg is 8 miles from Mendocino, a well-known destination. The rate motivates the extra driving and makes people excited about their discovery, which again drives word of mouth. .
Now that it's been posted, what do you think of the innkeeper who reduced rates THAT much?
Here, rates like that are associated with places that allow smoking and really low rent motels. And, as we have found, we don't get any more business than the places that charge $20 more and up per night.
.
I think every area has things that work and things that won't. I wouldn't suggest it here in a seasonal tourist area, but someplace else I could see it working. Of course I am leary of statements like "boosting revenue by $20K" because it doesn't say what it did to her expenses or what it meant in terms of net. I could drop my rates to $40 a night and my revenue would increase, but my expenses would crush me.
.
Right. I could charge $100/night in the winter to bring in biz, but could I afford to heat the house?
BTW, I think my daughter has found her house. It's on Lake St. I looked at the video tour last night, and it looks pretty nice. The prices are thru the roof, tho. I don't know how people afford those mortgages.
.
That lake is probably the highest of all...pretty Ritzy area. Lake St runs on both sides of the lake....is it on E or W?
.
I don't know. The map didn't show east or west. Eastern shore higher because of the sunset views?
.
I dunno... that could be one reason...though there are "old money" mansions on both sides. Some people like sunsets, some like sunrises. As a nightowl, I prefer the sunsets ;)
 

gillumhouse

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Joined
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Messages
15,520
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Here is most of the mailing:
Inn This Edition:
  • Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
  • Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
  • Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
Reviews on iLoveInns.com Give you Hearts
Please have your guests go to your listing on iloveinns.com and make reviews. This will give you Hearts! as you see on the Carlisle House example! Just send them a link to your listing 5-7 days after they return home from their visit. Watch next Marketing Tips for more ways inns are getting great reviews.
Promote what every guest wants – an authentic experience!
Travelers today aren’t interested in ‘look but don’t touch’ experiences – they want to have an authentic experience that makes true lifelong memories. Inns and B&Bs are perfectly in tune with that need – isn’t that what sets us apart from the hotel chains in the first place?
Amp up your uniquessness and give your guests a true sense of place.
Shellie Leete at The Claiborne House B&B in Rocky Mount, Virginia, promotes the authentic experience of a small town stay. To market this town located at the start of the Crooked Road (Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail) the inn has background music everywhere and asks on it's website, "Do you have Nature Deficit Disorder?"
Even before guests get to the inn, they can access a page on Shellie's web site devoted to local music events, with definitions to help out those new to heritage music, links to audio clips from local musicians, and slide shows of the sights along the Crooked Road.
Her promotion of her local area doesn’t stop with the music – she lists restaurants, historic sites and nature walks and her blog highlights an up-to-date schedule of events from book-signings to fun events for the family, like Antique Farm Tractor days. When she takes phone reservations she makes sure to [FONT= &quot]mention events that are happening[/FONT] during the guests’ stay to help them in their planning (and to decide to stay longer.)
Innkeeper Grows Occupancy 40% and Gains $21,000 in First Quarter 2008
A simple idea with big results. As many bed and breakfasts struggle to attract more guests during these economically challenging times, some innkeepers have taken to controversial methods to keep their business strong. Here, the method - lowering rates - worked well for this inn in a somewhat off-the-beaten-track area.
Cynthia Knauss, an innkeeper for 20 years, said the major secret to her success was when she focused on what was important – [FONT= &quot]filling her rooms[/FONT] at the Country Inn in Ft. Bragg, California. Three years ago she lowered her rates and made them more reasonable. This simple act gave her a $20K revenue increase for last year and already this year she has a $21K increase in revenues in the first 4 months alone!
In addition, she offers a mid-week special of $65 per night, with a two-night minimum. This fills her rooms during the week and the only concession she made was to not offer the afternoon wine and refreshments mid week. Everything else, from amenities to a full breakfast is the same, "no matter what room rate you pay or which night you stay." Word spread like wildfire! Her occupancy is up 40% for the first quarter of 2008.
This may be most effective for inns in beautiful little towns that are just a bit off the beaten path. Fort Bragg is 8 miles from Mendocino, a well-known destination. The rate motivates the extra driving and makes people excited about their discovery, which again drives word of mouth. .
Now that it's been posted, what do you think of the innkeeper who reduced rates THAT much?
Here, rates like that are associated with places that allow smoking and really low rent motels. And, as we have found, we don't get any more business than the places that charge $20 more and up per night.
.
I would not lower my rates. Even in winter I do not lower rates - I give discounts, sometimes. Other than a BOGO, I am not going to run myself ragged for no money. And as has already been pointed out, the electric bill will be higher because of all those A/C units running, water/swere higher because of showers and laundry and the food prices are going up so my fruit, juice, eggs, even flour are costing me more. So I am going to charge less? I do not think so....
Neglected to say - CONGRATS featured innkeeper!
 

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