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Do you know CPR?

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The Farmers Daughter

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Or know how to deal with a choking victim or similar emergency situation?
Anyone know the legalities of this?
 

JBloggs

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Yes. And the legalities of the Samaritan's Law (last time i looked) are IF you see someone choking and do not help you are liable. :)
 

Breakfast Diva

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Yes. And the legalities of the Samaritan's Law (last time i looked) are IF you see someone choking and do not help you are liable. :).
I think you're right about the Samaritan Law.
I've had CPR training, but really should do a refresher course...it's been many years.
 

EmptyNest

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YEs to both. THough I know my certification on CPR has run out long ago.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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I don't know CPR, but was thinking it would be good to be certified.
I was wondering about the legalities of having someone choke at your inn, try to assist them and getting sued for your efforts. The Murphy's law or the 'no good deed goes unpunished' theory.
 

EmptyNest

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I don't know CPR, but was thinking it would be good to be certified.
I was wondering about the legalities of having someone choke at your inn, try to assist them and getting sued for your efforts. The Murphy's law or the 'no good deed goes unpunished' theory.
.
As JBJ mentioned already...Good Samaratin law comes into play here. THough you know how "sue happy" some people can be. So in this day you just never know.
 

gillumhouse

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Same here. Took the class but too long ago to count for anything.
 

Proud Texan

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Not a lawyer...and don't even play one on TV, but Isn't the thinking concerning the Samaritan law different for CPR? I've heard you can get into trouble if you happen to crack a rib or if the person dies anyway.
 

JBloggs

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I don't know CPR, but was thinking it would be good to be certified.
I was wondering about the legalities of having someone choke at your inn, try to assist them and getting sued for your efforts. The Murphy's law or the 'no good deed goes unpunished' theory.
.
The Farmers Daughter said:
I don't know CPR, but was thinking it would be good to be certified.
I was wondering about the legalities of having someone choke at your inn, try to assist them and getting sued for your efforts. The Murphy's law or the 'no good deed goes unpunished' theory.
Good Samaritan laws in the United States are laws or acts protecting from liability those who choose to aid others who are injured or ill. They are intended to reduce bystanders' hesitation to assist, for fear of being sued or prosecuted for unintentional injury or wrongful death. Similarly, in Canada, a good Samaritan doctrine is a legal principle that prevents a rescuer who has voluntarily helped a victim in distress from being successfully sued for 'wrongdoing'. Its purpose is to keep people from being reluctant to help a stranger in need for fear of legal repercussions if they were to make some mistake in treatment.[1] Good Samaritan laws vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, as will their interactions with various other legal principles, such as consent, parental rights and the right to refuse treatment. Such laws generally do not apply to medical professionals' or career emergency responders' on-the-job conduct, but some extend protection to professional rescuers when they are acting in a volunteer capacity.
 

JBloggs

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Not a lawyer...and don't even play one on TV, but Isn't the thinking concerning the Samaritan law different for CPR? I've heard you can get into trouble if you happen to crack a rib or if the person dies anyway..
Proud Texan said:
Not a lawyer...and don't even play one on TV, but Isn't the thinking concerning the Samaritan law different for CPR? I've heard you can get into trouble if you happen to crack a rib or if the person dies anyway.
Yes, had them confused...
Comparison with duty to rescue
Good Samaritan laws may be confused with the duty to rescue, as described above. U.S. and Canadian approaches to this issue differ. Under the common law, good Samaritan laws provide a defence against torts arising from the attempted rescue. Such laws do not constitute a duty to rescue, such as exists in some civil law countries,[23] and in the common law under certain circumstances. However, the duty to rescue where it exists may itself imply a shield from liability; for example, under the German law of "Unterlassene Hilfeleistung" (neglect of duty to provide assistance), a citizen is obliged to provide first aid when necessary and is immune from prosecution if assistance given in good faith turns out to be harmful. In Canada, all provinces with the exception of Quebec operate on the basis of English Common Law. Quebec operates a civil law system, based in part on the Napoleonic Code, and the principle of duty to rescue does apply.[24]
To illustrate a variation in the concept of duty to rescue, in the Canadian province of Ontario, the Occupational Health and Safety Act provides all workers with the right to refuse to perform unsafe work. There are, however, specific exceptions to this right. When the "life, health or safety of another person is at risk," then specific groups, including "police officers, firefighters, or employees of a hospital, clinic or other type of medical worker (including EMS)" are specifically excluded from the right to refuse unsafe work.[25]
from here
 

Samster

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Yes, and I wouldn't hesitate to assist if someone needed assistance. Common sense should prevail. If someone knew CPR or the Heimlich maneuver, would you want them to stand by and do nothing if you needed help?
 
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