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Suzie Q

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I am considering fondues. Something different, romantic and to raise some extra $. Yes, I've considered chocolate/dessert fondues, too. No wine there.
Either the recipes call for a cheese I'm unfamiliar with, or they call for wine. I'm not licensed to sell wine.
Suggestions?
Thanks!
 

EmptyNest

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Putting wine into a fondue recipe is not the same as selling it. There are lots of fondue recipes that don't use wine.
But may I ask...why fondue??? It can be very messy. Not very practical to do I don't think and I am not sure you would get many takers for it. Why not try something else first. Are you legal to serve dinner??? To me something like a salad and a quiche and dessert would be more appealing for an evening if guests didn't want to go out to eat.
You aren't going to let them have it in their room are you??? I would not. I had little mini fondue pots I did ONCE with chocolate....note I say ONCE...it was very small pot with some fruits and cake for dipping. THey had it all over their bathrobes and on the bed. Last time I ever messed with that.
I would seriously consider some other options.
 

Suzie Q

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Putting wine into a fondue recipe is not the same as selling it. There are lots of fondue recipes that don't use wine.
But may I ask...why fondue??? It can be very messy. Not very practical to do I don't think and I am not sure you would get many takers for it. Why not try something else first. Are you legal to serve dinner??? To me something like a salad and a quiche and dessert would be more appealing for an evening if guests didn't want to go out to eat.
You aren't going to let them have it in their room are you??? I would not. I had little mini fondue pots I did ONCE with chocolate....note I say ONCE...it was very small pot with some fruits and cake for dipping. THey had it all over their bathrobes and on the bed. Last time I ever messed with that.
I would seriously consider some other options..
Thanks, El!
Yes, in our state we can sell meals as long as they are overnight guests, less than 5 rooms. This is not something I advertise, since I don't want anymore problems with the city.
It is something different and romantic. I have already gone to sandwiches, spaghetti dinners and dipped strawberries, for which I've already had a couple of takers. And bath salts. Hubby will be taking non-service related disability and I'm hoping to keep the bills up to date. I suppose for fondue time, I can go with a plastic table cloth, easy to wipe up, perhaps cheap to throw away if the cheese and/or chocolate stain it.
No, not in the room. :)
C
 

egoodell

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You cannot make a real fondue wtihout white wine and a shot of kirsh. The cheese can be found at any Whole Foods and specialty cheese shop.
If you are looking for something for dinner that might be easier, you could try Fondue Chinoise. It is called "Chinese Fondue" in Switzerland because instead of using hot oil in the pot you use boullion soup (*spelling?) which does not "spit" like the oil does.
You would slice the meat very thin instead of in chunks. My mother liked this version since it cooks faster. And serve with sauces.
At the end you put a shot of sherry in the boullion and drink the soup.
But I think unless you are serving dinner in a dining room it would be difficult. Plus it's more of a cold weather thing.
And I would only serve it in a dining room. I don't want any flames in the bedrooms.
We offer a picnic that they can eat in the room (blanket in front of the fireplace or in the dining room or porch) which is very popular. We get everything at our local gourmets - sandwich, fresh pastry, cheese plate and pack it all in a basket with dishes etc. and our guests enjoy that.
Riki
RIki
 

egoodell

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Putting wine into a fondue recipe is not the same as selling it. There are lots of fondue recipes that don't use wine.
But may I ask...why fondue??? It can be very messy. Not very practical to do I don't think and I am not sure you would get many takers for it. Why not try something else first. Are you legal to serve dinner??? To me something like a salad and a quiche and dessert would be more appealing for an evening if guests didn't want to go out to eat.
You aren't going to let them have it in their room are you??? I would not. I had little mini fondue pots I did ONCE with chocolate....note I say ONCE...it was very small pot with some fruits and cake for dipping. THey had it all over their bathrobes and on the bed. Last time I ever messed with that.
I would seriously consider some other options..
Thanks, El!
Yes, in our state we can sell meals as long as they are overnight guests, less than 5 rooms. This is not something I advertise, since I don't want anymore problems with the city.
It is something different and romantic. I have already gone to sandwiches, spaghetti dinners and dipped strawberries, for which I've already had a couple of takers. And bath salts. Hubby will be taking non-service related disability and I'm hoping to keep the bills up to date. I suppose for fondue time, I can go with a plastic table cloth, easy to wipe up, perhaps cheap to throw away if the cheese and/or chocolate stain it.
No, not in the room. :)
C
.
Then since it's not in the room it's actually very easy to make. Here is a basic recipe. You can have it all prepped and then start making it while they are sitting down and enjoying a light appetizer or aperetif.
I could not eat fondue without wine, but here in the US we are strange...and remember to stir it clockwise when making it so the spirits don't spoil it!
If you don't want to do the classic crusty bread along you can use artichoke hearts, steamed broccoli, roasted brussels sprouts or potato wedges and you won't be disappointed either. Here is a classic recipe although mine uses corn starch instead of flour and I use these two cheeses and a bit of Appenzeller.
Edited to say your bread should be a day old, not so fresh.
Ingredients[/h4]1/2 pound Emmentaler, grated 1/2 pound Gruyère, grated 1 clove of garlic, cut or slightly crushed 1 1/2 cups of white wine such as a Chenin Blanc 1 tablespoon lemon juice 3 tablespoons flour Ground pepper, to taste Nutmeg, to taste 2 loaves bread with thick crust cut into 1-inch cubes
Method[/h4]Combine Emmentaler and Le Gruyère with flour stir and set aside (either in medium bowl or in a plastic bag).
Rub the inside of the fondue pot with cut garlic clove.
Pour wine into pot and heat over medium heat until warm.
Add lemon juice.
Add cheese by handful, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon until melted and cheese-wine mixture has the consistency of a creamy sauce.
Add pepper and nutmeg to taste. Add a shot of Kirsch
Bring to boil.
Remove pot and put on lighted burner on table. Adjust flame of burner so fondue continues bubbling lightly or bring pot to table and set on a trivet. Serve each guest a handful of bread cubes. Spear fondue fork through bread cubes. Dunk and stir well to cover bread cube with cheese mixture. Enjoy!
 

Suzie Q

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You cannot make a real fondue wtihout white wine and a shot of kirsh. The cheese can be found at any Whole Foods and specialty cheese shop.
If you are looking for something for dinner that might be easier, you could try Fondue Chinoise. It is called "Chinese Fondue" in Switzerland because instead of using hot oil in the pot you use boullion soup (*spelling?) which does not "spit" like the oil does.
You would slice the meat very thin instead of in chunks. My mother liked this version since it cooks faster. And serve with sauces.
At the end you put a shot of sherry in the boullion and drink the soup.
But I think unless you are serving dinner in a dining room it would be difficult. Plus it's more of a cold weather thing.
And I would only serve it in a dining room. I don't want any flames in the bedrooms.
We offer a picnic that they can eat in the room (blanket in front of the fireplace or in the dining room or porch) which is very popular. We get everything at our local gourmets - sandwich, fresh pastry, cheese plate and pack it all in a basket with dishes etc. and our guests enjoy that.
Riki
RIki.
Thanks, Riki
I was wondering where to find the cheese that I'd never heard of. Will have to call w/f to see about the pricing. Thanks for the idea on the picnic, too! (Disposable dishes or otherwise?)
 

EmptyNest

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You cannot make a real fondue wtihout white wine and a shot of kirsh. The cheese can be found at any Whole Foods and specialty cheese shop.
If you are looking for something for dinner that might be easier, you could try Fondue Chinoise. It is called "Chinese Fondue" in Switzerland because instead of using hot oil in the pot you use boullion soup (*spelling?) which does not "spit" like the oil does.
You would slice the meat very thin instead of in chunks. My mother liked this version since it cooks faster. And serve with sauces.
At the end you put a shot of sherry in the boullion and drink the soup.
But I think unless you are serving dinner in a dining room it would be difficult. Plus it's more of a cold weather thing.
And I would only serve it in a dining room. I don't want any flames in the bedrooms.
We offer a picnic that they can eat in the room (blanket in front of the fireplace or in the dining room or porch) which is very popular. We get everything at our local gourmets - sandwich, fresh pastry, cheese plate and pack it all in a basket with dishes etc. and our guests enjoy that.
Riki
RIki.
Thanks, Riki
I was wondering where to find the cheese that I'd never heard of. Will have to call w/f to see about the pricing. Thanks for the idea on the picnic, too! (Disposable dishes or otherwise?)
.
I was going to mention the picnic basket idea as well. If they are having it in the house, I would use dishes and silverware...you want to make it very nice for them. If it is something to take away..then disposable and plastics are the way to go.
If you have a Kroger or a walmart super deli...they have an abundance of all these types of cheeses. Just tell them what you are making.
HEre is another recipe...no wine...but beer:) Here is a neat link as well.
8 oz of shredded chedder cheese.
8 oz shredded emmental chesse.( Swiss cheese)
1 garlic clove.
1 can of beer.
2 tablespoons of flour.
1 teaspoon of Salt.
Pinch of pepper.
French bread, diced into cubes.
[h3]Instructions for Cheese Fondue:[/h3]Mix together all of the ingredients (except bread).

Melt the mixture and place into a fondue pot.

Dip the cubes of bread into the melted mixture and eat.
 

egoodell

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You cannot make a real fondue wtihout white wine and a shot of kirsh. The cheese can be found at any Whole Foods and specialty cheese shop.
If you are looking for something for dinner that might be easier, you could try Fondue Chinoise. It is called "Chinese Fondue" in Switzerland because instead of using hot oil in the pot you use boullion soup (*spelling?) which does not "spit" like the oil does.
You would slice the meat very thin instead of in chunks. My mother liked this version since it cooks faster. And serve with sauces.
At the end you put a shot of sherry in the boullion and drink the soup.
But I think unless you are serving dinner in a dining room it would be difficult. Plus it's more of a cold weather thing.
And I would only serve it in a dining room. I don't want any flames in the bedrooms.
We offer a picnic that they can eat in the room (blanket in front of the fireplace or in the dining room or porch) which is very popular. We get everything at our local gourmets - sandwich, fresh pastry, cheese plate and pack it all in a basket with dishes etc. and our guests enjoy that.
Riki
RIki.
Thanks, Riki
I was wondering where to find the cheese that I'd never heard of. Will have to call w/f to see about the pricing. Thanks for the idea on the picnic, too! (Disposable dishes or otherwise?)
.
remnjava said:
Thanks, Riki
I was wondering where to find the cheese that I'd never heard of. Will have to call w/f to see about the pricing. Thanks for the idea on the picnic, too! (Disposable dishes or otherwise?)
Do you have a Whole Foods store near you? They have them, or any specialty cheese store.
The basket I line with a damask tablecloth and place good china dishes with folded napkins in between to keep them from banging. Good silver. Fresh pastry from the pastry shop in a china dish and cover with plastic wrap. Salad in a wooden salad bowl with the little dressing holder sitting on top and cover with plastic wrap.I know of an inn that would put the soup in a white teapot which was cute and easy to pour out, but I don't have a inhouse restaurant to do soups and am not allowed to cook etiher. Little salt and pepper grinder combo. Fold the tablecloth over the whole thing, Then can haul it anywhere they like.
We also have a car blanket in the rooms in the chest of drawers they can use to picnic indoors or out.
They do enjoy this and often take two days to eat it all - we have little wine fridges in their rooms where they can keep stuff if they like, and a larger one in the tasting room for the same reason.
RIki
 

Breakfast Diva

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I have an add-on fondue package that does amazingly well. My health dept regulations say I can not cook any other meals except breakfast. What I have done is to purchase a packaged fondue imported from Switzerland ($10.00). All I do is heat it up, chop up a red and a green apple and cube up some good bread and deliver it to them at their choice of time. They eat it in their room and when they are done, they put it outside their room (like roomservice). I have never had a problem with them getting cheese all over or making a mess. I will not do a chocolate fondue because of the fear of them getting chocolate all over.
I have marketed it as a great "light dinner" to add-on for those who don't want to stop for dinner on their way to us after work. I get a lot of them ordered for Friday nights. I put approximately a 200% markup, it takes 10 minutes to prepare and everyone is happy, including my health dept. On my last inspection, they arrived with my add-on page from my website in hand to confirm I was not cooking it myself. The picture I show on my website has a fondue pot, loaf of bread, 2 apples and the box of fondue. I'm not trying to fool anyone into thinking I'm making it myself. What people are looking for is the convenience of not having to go out, especially since I'm in a rural area and restaurants are about a 10 minute drive.
 

MTLLodge

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Breakfast Diva, you sound so much like what I'm dealing with. Rural area, health dept. etc..... could you email me where you get your fondue?
 
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