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Happy Independence Day

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wendydk

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Tomorrow is going to be a pretty busy day for me, so wanted to take this opportunity to wish a Happy Independence Day to everyone. This has always been my favorite holiday, I've always been strongly independent, and even when working a full time job, always had a little business of some kind on the side, Having my own Inn is the ultimate culmination of my dreams, experience and personality.
Anyway, Happy 4th of July to my fellow Innkeepers...some of the most fiercely independent people I have ever known! May you take a few minutes to enjoy yourselves this weekend!
 

gillumhouse

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Thank you and the same back. My flag is out. My City put the flags up Monday along the main drag. The Concert was rained out but I am fortunate enough to live in a State that is fiercely patriotic and proud of it.
May everyone stop for a moment and ponder the price that has been paid for our freedom.
This was sent to me today by an alum of the old high school here - he is now in his 80s. It really does say it all.
If you think Liberty is Free, it's only because your not the poor son
that died for it !!!!
THE 4TH OF JULY Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who
signed the Declaration of Independence?
Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured
before they died.
Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving
in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.
Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the
Revolutionary War.
They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their
sacred honor.
What kind of men were they?
Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were
farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated, but
they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the
penalty would be death if they were captured. Carter Braxton of
Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the
seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his
debts, and died in rags.
Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move
his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and
hi s family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and
poverty was his reward.
Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.
At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British
General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters.
He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was
destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.
Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed
his wife, and she died within a few months.
John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying. Their 13
children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to
waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning
home to find his wife dead and his children vanished. Some of us take
these liberties so much for granted, but we shouldn't.
So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they
paid.
Remember: freedom is never free!
I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many people as
you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism is NOT a
sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and
baseball games
 

mooseberry

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Happy 4th to all and everyone from Alaska too.......
 

Penelope

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Thank you and the same back. My flag is out. My City put the flags up Monday along the main drag. The Concert was rained out but I am fortunate enough to live in a State that is fiercely patriotic and proud of it.
May everyone stop for a moment and ponder the price that has been paid for our freedom.
This was sent to me today by an alum of the old high school here - he is now in his 80s. It really does say it all.
If you think Liberty is Free, it's only because your not the poor son
that died for it !!!!
THE 4TH OF JULY Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who
signed the Declaration of Independence?
Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured
before they died.
Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving
in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.
Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the
Revolutionary War.
They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their
sacred honor.
What kind of men were they?
Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were
farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated, but
they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the
penalty would be death if they were captured. Carter Braxton of
Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the
seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his
debts, and died in rags.
Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move
his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and
hi s family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and
poverty was his reward.
Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.
At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British
General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters.
He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was
destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.
Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed
his wife, and she died within a few months.
John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying. Their 13
children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to
waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning
home to find his wife dead and his children vanished. Some of us take
these liberties so much for granted, but we shouldn't.
So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they
paid.
Remember: freedom is never free!
I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many people as
you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism is NOT a
sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and
baseball games.
gillumhouse said:
Thank you and the same back. My flag is out. My City put the flags up Monday along the main drag. The Concert was rained out but I am fortunate enough to live in a State that is fiercely patriotic and proud of it.
May everyone stop for a moment and ponder the price that has been paid for our freedom.
This was sent to me today by an alum of the old high school here - he is now in his 80s. It really does say it all.
If you think Liberty is Free, it's only because your not the poor son
that died for it !!!!
THE 4TH OF JULY Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who
signed the Declaration of Independence?
Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured
before they died.
Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving
in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.
Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the
Revolutionary War.
They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their
sacred honor.
What kind of men were they?
Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were
farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated, but
they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the
penalty would be death if they were captured. Carter Braxton of
Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the
seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his
debts, and died in rags.
Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move
his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and
hi s family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and
poverty was his reward.
Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.
At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British
General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters.
He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was
destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.
Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed
his wife, and she died within a few months.
John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying. Their 13
children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to
waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning
home to find his wife dead and his children vanished. Some of us take
these liberties so much for granted, but we shouldn't.
So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they
paid.
Remember: freedom is never free!
I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many people as
you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism is NOT a
sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and
baseball games
I always find it interesting to think of how common those amazing people were. Nowadays, it seems as though one has to have the "right speech" or the "right clothes" or the "right bloodlines" or the "right education" to be a leader. Maybe not so much.
Common, everyday people can do extordinary things when they set their mind to it and if they believe in it passionately enough. It seems to be as though too many people have lost their passion.
I hope everyone had a wonderful 4th of July.
God Bless America!
 

Country Girl

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I know this is a bit late, but happy belated 4th. My dad turned 89 on July 4 and is still sharp as a tack. He gave a very powerful speech about freedom and independence and the responsibility that goes with both. In the midst of a great celebration it gave us reason to pause and reflect. This is a great nation.
 
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