Hello and Welcome - and other common manners

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JBloggs

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HELLO & WELCOME![/h4]Imagine heading off to a dinner party hosted by your good and favoured friends? Imagine the excitement looking forward to an evening of welcomes, warmth and fun. Imagine the expectation.
The greeting is key. If it’s a Bank, a Church, a business or a Pub, it sets the mood, tone and expectation. Get it right and you are half way there. Get it wrong and you can load that toe shooting gun.
We received an enquiry, a request to help make business better. I went to meet her at her Pub. I arrived on time and almost passed out from the disinfectant. “Clean at least” I thought to myself. The lights were down and the hairy mop looked half human. From the shadows she appeared, hands on hips “Yes” she said through an aggressive cold eyed stare “Can I help you?” I thought about it and gently replied “No thanks” turned and left.
On my way back to the office I wondered why she thought business was not booming.
GOODBYE AND THANK YOU[/h4]My Mother always taught me the importance of simple good manners. Today, that is missing in younger generations, and it shows. Too many Pubs have got caught up in the pursuit of profit instead of serving their customers. Some are grumpy, some nasty and others purely exploitative. The concept of the extra mile is missing and greed has overtaken humility.
Excess deflects from what is right, what is the road less easy. Today, more than ever before, Publicans need to focus on the customer, what is right, and what is good for customers, not themselves. If they do that, the rest will take care of itself.
Finally, that wonderful dinner party is over, the lights are going down, it’s time to say goodbye. You see, every evening finishes on a note or tone, just like the beginning. How often have I had fun, engaged with your staff and soaked up the fun, laughter and merriment and how often have you made time to say goodbye? Most don’t bother. Simple, but as my Mother told me, memorable!

To quote Rick Warren; “Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it's thinking of yourself less” Not a bad idea in a perfect storm.
Juicy Tidbits/Excerpts are from this article
Explanation from JB - I know in the past comments have been made by some that there is no hospitality training required to own and operate a bed and breakfast and everything is peachy. I disagree with this and feel that this is what is lacking - not just in restaurants/pubs but also in the B&B environment. This article is for publicans and perspective of a pub goer, so take what you want and leave the rest. :)
 

Morticia

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Funny how every pub we went into in Ireland (in 1995) treated us like we were a bother. Looks like nothing has changed.
We were obviously (to them) too stupid to know you can't get food in a pub at noon. Or at 4 PM. Or at 6 PM.
There was a serious disconnect between the locals and the tourists. "Get their money and get them gone," was how I felt. For all everyone says how friendly it is there, and I was basically 'home,' I did not get the warm fuzzy vibe at all.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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There is nothing like good service and that sounded nothing like good service.
I have noticed this as well especially in the younger generation. No please or thank yous. Basic common courtersy is missing.
 

JBloggs

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No comment. Ireland it not the same as it used to be. Oops I made a comment. But this is about where WE LIVE, relative comments, not about where that dude went. The eye rolling waitress a week ago did me in!
 

The Farmers Daughter

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No comment. Ireland it not the same as it used to be. Oops I made a comment. But this is about where WE LIVE, relative comments, not about where that dude went. The eye rolling waitress a week ago did me in!.
Joey Bloggs said:
No comment. Ireland it not the same as it used to be. Oops I made a comment. But this is about where WE LIVE, relative comments, not about where that dude went. The eye rolling waitress a week ago did me in!
Joey - Are you in the USA, Canada, UK or ? Just curious.
 

JBloggs

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No comment. Ireland it not the same as it used to be. Oops I made a comment. But this is about where WE LIVE, relative comments, not about where that dude went. The eye rolling waitress a week ago did me in!.
Joey Bloggs said:
No comment. Ireland it not the same as it used to be. Oops I made a comment. But this is about where WE LIVE, relative comments, not about where that dude went. The eye rolling waitress a week ago did me in!
Joey - Are you in the USA, Canada, UK or ? Just curious.
.
USA
My sister lives in Ireland, my parents are flying over tomorrow and there will be a standstill at all three Ireland airports. See BBC Ireland article here http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/northern_ireland/8469187.stm
 

gillumhouse

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There is nothing like good service and that sounded nothing like good service.
I have noticed this as well especially in the younger generation. No please or thank yous. Basic common courtersy is missing..
have noticed this as well especially in the younger generation. No please or thank yous. Basic common courtersy is missing.
I am actually finding MORE courtesy among the younger set. I have seen more young people halfway to the parking lot, turn around and come back to open a door for Himself. Going out of their way to ask if they can help him (and even me!). I did not see this 5 years ago, but am seeing it now.
 
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I found The Homestead Resort employees very courtious,helpful,friendly.On the other hand in there area if they are not nice they can be replaced by many locals wanting a job.I still have good memories of The Homestead.I'll check out The Boars Head in Feb. Mary in Bridgewater.
 

Breakfast Diva

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I absolutely agree with the article. Customer service, common courtesy and manners can make or break a people oriented business. Over the years, it's been difficult at times to keep the smile and graciousness when some guests (a VERY small minority) have been careless and broken or damaged things during their stay. I've stayed gracious and polite even when guests have dropped heavy items and gouged my beautiful wood floors (3xs this has happened).Only once have I ever charged for something damaged and I was as gracious as was possible for the circumstance.
A situation happened this morning where I lost my graciousness, showed my irritation and conveyed how astounded I was at their actions. In thinking about the quote of Rick Warren; “Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it's thinking of yourself less” Not a bad idea in a perfect storm.", at what point does one draw the line? Are we supposed to always be gracious?
We have a 115 year old house built out of wood. Wood is exposed everywhere, wood floors, exposed wood walls, wood around the tub, etc. We do not allow flame candles in the rooms. We provide them with 3 pillar candles that run on batteries. Our website states no candles in a prominant location, our cancellation policy which they have to click on to make an online reservation states no candles. Their confirmation letter states no candles. Our one night guests checked out this morning and I was lovely and gracious...I went into their room and I flipped my lid. The previous night, they had rummaged through a storage cupboard in one of the common areas, taken some porcelin little dishes into their room and lit about 20 tea light candles (I found them in the trash) which they then placed in the dishes. I could tell this from the wax that was still left all over the bottom of the dishes.
At this point, the guests returned back from their car thinking they had left something in their room. There I was, standing with the waxy dishes and I just couldn't contain my anger. I didn't scream or yell, but I certainly was not gracious. I told them that candles were strictly forbidden which of course they said they didn't know, and when I reminded them of our old wooden house, she said "oh, that's why we were so careful". I also told them that it wasn't ok for them to have taken the dishes from my personal area. They left here with their tails between their legs and will never be back, and I would never want them back.
As innkeepers, we all have to think quick on our feet when situations happen and as much as I feel like they deserved the attitude I gave them, part of me feels guilty for not biting my tongue, but I was just astounded how anybody could be so careless and stupid and think it's ok to go through cupboards. And besides, they left the damn wax in the dishes for me to clean up!!!
At what point are we supposed to stand up for ourselves?!?!
 

Morticia

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I absolutely agree with the article. Customer service, common courtesy and manners can make or break a people oriented business. Over the years, it's been difficult at times to keep the smile and graciousness when some guests (a VERY small minority) have been careless and broken or damaged things during their stay. I've stayed gracious and polite even when guests have dropped heavy items and gouged my beautiful wood floors (3xs this has happened).Only once have I ever charged for something damaged and I was as gracious as was possible for the circumstance.
A situation happened this morning where I lost my graciousness, showed my irritation and conveyed how astounded I was at their actions. In thinking about the quote of Rick Warren; “Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it's thinking of yourself less” Not a bad idea in a perfect storm.", at what point does one draw the line? Are we supposed to always be gracious?
We have a 115 year old house built out of wood. Wood is exposed everywhere, wood floors, exposed wood walls, wood around the tub, etc. We do not allow flame candles in the rooms. We provide them with 3 pillar candles that run on batteries. Our website states no candles in a prominant location, our cancellation policy which they have to click on to make an online reservation states no candles. Their confirmation letter states no candles. Our one night guests checked out this morning and I was lovely and gracious...I went into their room and I flipped my lid. The previous night, they had rummaged through a storage cupboard in one of the common areas, taken some porcelin little dishes into their room and lit about 20 tea light candles (I found them in the trash) which they then placed in the dishes. I could tell this from the wax that was still left all over the bottom of the dishes.
At this point, the guests returned back from their car thinking they had left something in their room. There I was, standing with the waxy dishes and I just couldn't contain my anger. I didn't scream or yell, but I certainly was not gracious. I told them that candles were strictly forbidden which of course they said they didn't know, and when I reminded them of our old wooden house, she said "oh, that's why we were so careful". I also told them that it wasn't ok for them to have taken the dishes from my personal area. They left here with their tails between their legs and will never be back, and I would never want them back.
As innkeepers, we all have to think quick on our feet when situations happen and as much as I feel like they deserved the attitude I gave them, part of me feels guilty for not biting my tongue, but I was just astounded how anybody could be so careless and stupid and think it's ok to go through cupboards. And besides, they left the damn wax in the dishes for me to clean up!!!
At what point are we supposed to stand up for ourselves?!?!.
I think you were right. What they did went beyond a one candle 'oops.'
I guess the focus in this sort of situation, to truly drive the point home, is to not focus on OUR inconvenience (because guests don't care about that if they have inconvenienced us) in having to do all that cleaning, but in focusing on how things could have worked out quite differently had any of those candles caused a fire. And the issue of taking all the saucers.
Of course, every last one of us has had someone retort, 'Well the house DIDN'T catch fire so what's your PROBLEM?'
You're right, they won't be back, but you've perhaps saved someone else from the same problem or worse. I don't think a bad economy means we lose our spines.
I wonder about graciousness and like to think, 'What would the Queen do?' Sometimes, tho, it's not Queen Elizabeth I channel, it's the Red Queen ('Off with her head!')
 

Breakfast Diva

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I absolutely agree with the article. Customer service, common courtesy and manners can make or break a people oriented business. Over the years, it's been difficult at times to keep the smile and graciousness when some guests (a VERY small minority) have been careless and broken or damaged things during their stay. I've stayed gracious and polite even when guests have dropped heavy items and gouged my beautiful wood floors (3xs this has happened).Only once have I ever charged for something damaged and I was as gracious as was possible for the circumstance.
A situation happened this morning where I lost my graciousness, showed my irritation and conveyed how astounded I was at their actions. In thinking about the quote of Rick Warren; “Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it's thinking of yourself less” Not a bad idea in a perfect storm.", at what point does one draw the line? Are we supposed to always be gracious?
We have a 115 year old house built out of wood. Wood is exposed everywhere, wood floors, exposed wood walls, wood around the tub, etc. We do not allow flame candles in the rooms. We provide them with 3 pillar candles that run on batteries. Our website states no candles in a prominant location, our cancellation policy which they have to click on to make an online reservation states no candles. Their confirmation letter states no candles. Our one night guests checked out this morning and I was lovely and gracious...I went into their room and I flipped my lid. The previous night, they had rummaged through a storage cupboard in one of the common areas, taken some porcelin little dishes into their room and lit about 20 tea light candles (I found them in the trash) which they then placed in the dishes. I could tell this from the wax that was still left all over the bottom of the dishes.
At this point, the guests returned back from their car thinking they had left something in their room. There I was, standing with the waxy dishes and I just couldn't contain my anger. I didn't scream or yell, but I certainly was not gracious. I told them that candles were strictly forbidden which of course they said they didn't know, and when I reminded them of our old wooden house, she said "oh, that's why we were so careful". I also told them that it wasn't ok for them to have taken the dishes from my personal area. They left here with their tails between their legs and will never be back, and I would never want them back.
As innkeepers, we all have to think quick on our feet when situations happen and as much as I feel like they deserved the attitude I gave them, part of me feels guilty for not biting my tongue, but I was just astounded how anybody could be so careless and stupid and think it's ok to go through cupboards. And besides, they left the damn wax in the dishes for me to clean up!!!
At what point are we supposed to stand up for ourselves?!?!.
I think you were right. What they did went beyond a one candle 'oops.'
I guess the focus in this sort of situation, to truly drive the point home, is to not focus on OUR inconvenience (because guests don't care about that if they have inconvenienced us) in having to do all that cleaning, but in focusing on how things could have worked out quite differently had any of those candles caused a fire. And the issue of taking all the saucers.
Of course, every last one of us has had someone retort, 'Well the house DIDN'T catch fire so what's your PROBLEM?'
You're right, they won't be back, but you've perhaps saved someone else from the same problem or worse. I don't think a bad economy means we lose our spines.
I wonder about graciousness and like to think, 'What would the Queen do?' Sometimes, tho, it's not Queen Elizabeth I channel, it's the Red Queen ('Off with her head!')
.
hahaha...if I had a sword at the moment, you'd have seen their heads rolling!
You're right about guests not caring about the innkeeper being inconvenienced. Afterall most of the time it really is our job to be accommodating. I guess it's when I'm made to feel disrespected that I develop resentments.
At this point I feel my fuse getting shorter when it comes to people being stupid. Is that a sign of burnout? Hmmm...maybe, but I don't think so. I feel myself getting more impatient with age, not necessarily innkeeping. I can now really relate to those old grumpy folks. Heck, with as many years as they lived, they deserve to be grumpy if they want to be.
 

Don Draper

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I have to say I think your reaction was exactly appropriate given the moment that they found you, actually standing there and still processing the fact that not only did they violate a policy, they actually went digging around in your personal things to find the dishes??? Every 5 year old knows this is inappropriate. It doesn't sound like you were rude or hostile, just telling them the truth of it.
Why is it more appropriate to be "gracious"? What would it have meant if you'd choked back your anger, smiled and said "Have a nice day!"??? To me that is just flat being dishonest and I don't see what good that would do anybody, especially you to have to swallow that. But many people in this industry would say you should have done just that. To each his own I guess, but to me as a fellow innkeeper you did ME a favor by schooling these two inconsiderate people.
 

Morticia

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I absolutely agree with the article. Customer service, common courtesy and manners can make or break a people oriented business. Over the years, it's been difficult at times to keep the smile and graciousness when some guests (a VERY small minority) have been careless and broken or damaged things during their stay. I've stayed gracious and polite even when guests have dropped heavy items and gouged my beautiful wood floors (3xs this has happened).Only once have I ever charged for something damaged and I was as gracious as was possible for the circumstance.
A situation happened this morning where I lost my graciousness, showed my irritation and conveyed how astounded I was at their actions. In thinking about the quote of Rick Warren; “Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it's thinking of yourself less” Not a bad idea in a perfect storm.", at what point does one draw the line? Are we supposed to always be gracious?
We have a 115 year old house built out of wood. Wood is exposed everywhere, wood floors, exposed wood walls, wood around the tub, etc. We do not allow flame candles in the rooms. We provide them with 3 pillar candles that run on batteries. Our website states no candles in a prominant location, our cancellation policy which they have to click on to make an online reservation states no candles. Their confirmation letter states no candles. Our one night guests checked out this morning and I was lovely and gracious...I went into their room and I flipped my lid. The previous night, they had rummaged through a storage cupboard in one of the common areas, taken some porcelin little dishes into their room and lit about 20 tea light candles (I found them in the trash) which they then placed in the dishes. I could tell this from the wax that was still left all over the bottom of the dishes.
At this point, the guests returned back from their car thinking they had left something in their room. There I was, standing with the waxy dishes and I just couldn't contain my anger. I didn't scream or yell, but I certainly was not gracious. I told them that candles were strictly forbidden which of course they said they didn't know, and when I reminded them of our old wooden house, she said "oh, that's why we were so careful". I also told them that it wasn't ok for them to have taken the dishes from my personal area. They left here with their tails between their legs and will never be back, and I would never want them back.
As innkeepers, we all have to think quick on our feet when situations happen and as much as I feel like they deserved the attitude I gave them, part of me feels guilty for not biting my tongue, but I was just astounded how anybody could be so careless and stupid and think it's ok to go through cupboards. And besides, they left the damn wax in the dishes for me to clean up!!!
At what point are we supposed to stand up for ourselves?!?!.
I think you were right. What they did went beyond a one candle 'oops.'
I guess the focus in this sort of situation, to truly drive the point home, is to not focus on OUR inconvenience (because guests don't care about that if they have inconvenienced us) in having to do all that cleaning, but in focusing on how things could have worked out quite differently had any of those candles caused a fire. And the issue of taking all the saucers.
Of course, every last one of us has had someone retort, 'Well the house DIDN'T catch fire so what's your PROBLEM?'
You're right, they won't be back, but you've perhaps saved someone else from the same problem or worse. I don't think a bad economy means we lose our spines.
I wonder about graciousness and like to think, 'What would the Queen do?' Sometimes, tho, it's not Queen Elizabeth I channel, it's the Red Queen ('Off with her head!')
.
hahaha...if I had a sword at the moment, you'd have seen their heads rolling!
You're right about guests not caring about the innkeeper being inconvenienced. Afterall most of the time it really is our job to be accommodating. I guess it's when I'm made to feel disrespected that I develop resentments.
At this point I feel my fuse getting shorter when it comes to people being stupid. Is that a sign of burnout? Hmmm...maybe, but I don't think so. I feel myself getting more impatient with age, not necessarily innkeeping. I can now really relate to those old grumpy folks. Heck, with as many years as they lived, they deserve to be grumpy if they want to be.
.
Not burnout per se. I think it is an accumulation. Like the straw that broke the camel's back. It's not the first straw or even the 50th straw, but when they've been stacked too high for too long, oh wait, that IS burnout.
But, seriously, I think it's just a matter of being SO incensed by this one situation. Because 90% of the time things like this don't happen. You get lulled into a false sense of bonhomie.
Like me with the couple who had to take BOTH duvets to put in their bed so their butts were nice and cushy.
Or the woman who rooted around the entire kitchen, touching everything, opening everything to find Saran wrap. She couldn't ask? And when we found her in the kitchen SHE yelled as US. Because she couldn't find the Saran wrap, like it's OUR fault that OUR kitchen didn't have what SHE wanted.
You know I still have no animosity toward that kid who peed the bed for a week straight, but his mother? Off with her head. She's the one who piled the peed-stained, wet and nasty clothes all over my carpets and shoved them up against the wallpaper. And denied right up to the day she left that the kid wet the bed.
But the other 90% of the guests are sweethearts. We get lulled. We let down our guard. (Internally.)
 

gillumhouse

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I absolutely agree with the article. Customer service, common courtesy and manners can make or break a people oriented business. Over the years, it's been difficult at times to keep the smile and graciousness when some guests (a VERY small minority) have been careless and broken or damaged things during their stay. I've stayed gracious and polite even when guests have dropped heavy items and gouged my beautiful wood floors (3xs this has happened).Only once have I ever charged for something damaged and I was as gracious as was possible for the circumstance.
A situation happened this morning where I lost my graciousness, showed my irritation and conveyed how astounded I was at their actions. In thinking about the quote of Rick Warren; “Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it's thinking of yourself less” Not a bad idea in a perfect storm.", at what point does one draw the line? Are we supposed to always be gracious?
We have a 115 year old house built out of wood. Wood is exposed everywhere, wood floors, exposed wood walls, wood around the tub, etc. We do not allow flame candles in the rooms. We provide them with 3 pillar candles that run on batteries. Our website states no candles in a prominant location, our cancellation policy which they have to click on to make an online reservation states no candles. Their confirmation letter states no candles. Our one night guests checked out this morning and I was lovely and gracious...I went into their room and I flipped my lid. The previous night, they had rummaged through a storage cupboard in one of the common areas, taken some porcelin little dishes into their room and lit about 20 tea light candles (I found them in the trash) which they then placed in the dishes. I could tell this from the wax that was still left all over the bottom of the dishes.
At this point, the guests returned back from their car thinking they had left something in their room. There I was, standing with the waxy dishes and I just couldn't contain my anger. I didn't scream or yell, but I certainly was not gracious. I told them that candles were strictly forbidden which of course they said they didn't know, and when I reminded them of our old wooden house, she said "oh, that's why we were so careful". I also told them that it wasn't ok for them to have taken the dishes from my personal area. They left here with their tails between their legs and will never be back, and I would never want them back.
As innkeepers, we all have to think quick on our feet when situations happen and as much as I feel like they deserved the attitude I gave them, part of me feels guilty for not biting my tongue, but I was just astounded how anybody could be so careless and stupid and think it's ok to go through cupboards. And besides, they left the damn wax in the dishes for me to clean up!!!
At what point are we supposed to stand up for ourselves?!?!.
At what point are we supposed to stand up for ourselves?!?!
Bouquets to you for telling them they were wrong. The threat of fire is a very real item - not a pulled out of the sky what if. It happens! They could have been toast AND burned down your inn and Who would have suffered the consequences? YOU. If they were toast you would still be the one to suffer courtesy of their survivors (I would have no sympathy for the toasted). I believe I would have also pointed out that if they had observed common courtesy and asked for the dishes, you would have reminded them of the policy and cupboards have doors for a reason - to keep people from rummaging where they do not belong.
Thank you for telling them. This is one couple no innkeeper will be sorry to lose to a motel.
 

JBloggs

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I absolutely agree with the article. Customer service, common courtesy and manners can make or break a people oriented business. Over the years, it's been difficult at times to keep the smile and graciousness when some guests (a VERY small minority) have been careless and broken or damaged things during their stay. I've stayed gracious and polite even when guests have dropped heavy items and gouged my beautiful wood floors (3xs this has happened).Only once have I ever charged for something damaged and I was as gracious as was possible for the circumstance.
A situation happened this morning where I lost my graciousness, showed my irritation and conveyed how astounded I was at their actions. In thinking about the quote of Rick Warren; “Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it's thinking of yourself less” Not a bad idea in a perfect storm.", at what point does one draw the line? Are we supposed to always be gracious?
We have a 115 year old house built out of wood. Wood is exposed everywhere, wood floors, exposed wood walls, wood around the tub, etc. We do not allow flame candles in the rooms. We provide them with 3 pillar candles that run on batteries. Our website states no candles in a prominant location, our cancellation policy which they have to click on to make an online reservation states no candles. Their confirmation letter states no candles. Our one night guests checked out this morning and I was lovely and gracious...I went into their room and I flipped my lid. The previous night, they had rummaged through a storage cupboard in one of the common areas, taken some porcelin little dishes into their room and lit about 20 tea light candles (I found them in the trash) which they then placed in the dishes. I could tell this from the wax that was still left all over the bottom of the dishes.
At this point, the guests returned back from their car thinking they had left something in their room. There I was, standing with the waxy dishes and I just couldn't contain my anger. I didn't scream or yell, but I certainly was not gracious. I told them that candles were strictly forbidden which of course they said they didn't know, and when I reminded them of our old wooden house, she said "oh, that's why we were so careful". I also told them that it wasn't ok for them to have taken the dishes from my personal area. They left here with their tails between their legs and will never be back, and I would never want them back.
As innkeepers, we all have to think quick on our feet when situations happen and as much as I feel like they deserved the attitude I gave them, part of me feels guilty for not biting my tongue, but I was just astounded how anybody could be so careless and stupid and think it's ok to go through cupboards. And besides, they left the damn wax in the dishes for me to clean up!!!
At what point are we supposed to stand up for ourselves?!?!.
I think you were right. What they did went beyond a one candle 'oops.'
I guess the focus in this sort of situation, to truly drive the point home, is to not focus on OUR inconvenience (because guests don't care about that if they have inconvenienced us) in having to do all that cleaning, but in focusing on how things could have worked out quite differently had any of those candles caused a fire. And the issue of taking all the saucers.
Of course, every last one of us has had someone retort, 'Well the house DIDN'T catch fire so what's your PROBLEM?'
You're right, they won't be back, but you've perhaps saved someone else from the same problem or worse. I don't think a bad economy means we lose our spines.
I wonder about graciousness and like to think, 'What would the Queen do?' Sometimes, tho, it's not Queen Elizabeth I channel, it's the Red Queen ('Off with her head!')
.
hahaha...if I had a sword at the moment, you'd have seen their heads rolling!
You're right about guests not caring about the innkeeper being inconvenienced. Afterall most of the time it really is our job to be accommodating. I guess it's when I'm made to feel disrespected that I develop resentments.
At this point I feel my fuse getting shorter when it comes to people being stupid. Is that a sign of burnout? Hmmm...maybe, but I don't think so. I feel myself getting more impatient with age, not necessarily innkeeping. I can now really relate to those old grumpy folks. Heck, with as many years as they lived, they deserve to be grumpy if they want to be.
.
Breakfast Diva said:
hahaha...if I had a sword at the moment, you'd have seen their heads rolling!
You're right about guests not caring about the innkeeper being inconvenienced. Afterall most of the time it really is our job to be accommodating. I guess it's when I'm made to feel disrespected that I develop resentments.
At this point I feel my fuse getting shorter when it comes to people being stupid. Is that a sign of burnout? Hmmm...maybe, but I don't think so. I feel myself getting more impatient with age, not necessarily innkeeping. I can now really relate to those old grumpy folks. Heck, with as many years as they lived, they deserve to be grumpy if they want to be.
There is no reason you need to explain either - stupidity is something no one can handle, but it is not going away any time soon.
I am actually quite impressed when people come in and trash something or take something or have no boundaries and innkeepers are so allowing of it. Like leaving barf in a breakfast basket. They would be out on their tails so fast - they better dodge the bullets as they pull away. See there is patience and then there is...well nuff said. I have kids here and so my fuse is probably shorter than those without kids in the house. I always said anyone without kids can be the most patient person in the world - your kids can wind you up from zero to 60 in one second flat. Oh yeah, and sit back and watch the show! So this is what this your story is like - kids, doing stupid stuff.
 
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