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homemade jelly??

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four at four forty four

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I have made freezer jam before, but I'm looking for a recipe for jelly/jam that doesn't need frozen, but will seal it sell and last for a year or so...?
Anyone have a favorite recipe? or can direct me some place to find one?
 

Copperhead

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Well I use the Sure Jell Pectin box recipes for my jams and have had great success but you MUST follow the recipe to a tee! Just use the reg. canning jars. I do not have a canner, but have found through other methods of how to create a good seal with the jars. Here goes:
Of course you clean the jars and lids prior to use, then keep the jars in a pot with hot water, place the sealing lids in a 2nd pan with water, boil then just keep in hot water while making your jam. As directed in the jam recipe, pour into jars, then immediately place the sealing lids on each and then tighten the lid ring in place. Next turn sealed jars upside down in a sink of warm water (filled at least 1/3 prior to adding jars). Let sit for 10 - 15 minutes then remove all jars from water and place right side up. I find that most will form the vacuum very quickly, but sometimes it is within a few hours (as the jelly cools). As with any other canning method, any jars that do not seal must be refrigerated.
Good luck and happy jelly making!
 

four at four forty four

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Well I use the Sure Jell Pectin box recipes for my jams and have had great success but you MUST follow the recipe to a tee! Just use the reg. canning jars. I do not have a canner, but have found through other methods of how to create a good seal with the jars. Here goes:
Of course you clean the jars and lids prior to use, then keep the jars in a pot with hot water, place the sealing lids in a 2nd pan with water, boil then just keep in hot water while making your jam. As directed in the jam recipe, pour into jars, then immediately place the sealing lids on each and then tighten the lid ring in place. Next turn sealed jars upside down in a sink of warm water (filled at least 1/3 prior to adding jars). Let sit for 10 - 15 minutes then remove all jars from water and place right side up. I find that most will form the vacuum very quickly, but sometimes it is within a few hours (as the jelly cools). As with any other canning method, any jars that do not seal must be refrigerated.
Good luck and happy jelly making!.
Amazing! Thank you, thank you!!
 

Penelope

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I know you said you are in the NE, but there might be a product out your way called Dutch Jel. I have used it for years and I like it better than the others on the market. I make GOBS of jams/jellies/pies in a jar every year. I'm talking 200 or more every year. I like Dutch Jel because you can buy it in bulk instead of in the onesie-twosie packages at the store.
Like Copperhead says, the warm water in the sink method works, but if you want a more trusted method, hot water bath them. I don't have any fancy equipment, either. I just use my biggest cooking pot and make sure the jars fit in it. I am actually canning peaches right now and I am trying to figure out what I want to make next: peach jam or jelly.
Good luck and no matter what happens, there is NOTHING better than you own jams and jellies! Even if you mess up, you can still use most oopsies as ice cream topping!!! :)
 

EmptyNest

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Well I use the Sure Jell Pectin box recipes for my jams and have had great success but you MUST follow the recipe to a tee! Just use the reg. canning jars. I do not have a canner, but have found through other methods of how to create a good seal with the jars. Here goes:
Of course you clean the jars and lids prior to use, then keep the jars in a pot with hot water, place the sealing lids in a 2nd pan with water, boil then just keep in hot water while making your jam. As directed in the jam recipe, pour into jars, then immediately place the sealing lids on each and then tighten the lid ring in place. Next turn sealed jars upside down in a sink of warm water (filled at least 1/3 prior to adding jars). Let sit for 10 - 15 minutes then remove all jars from water and place right side up. I find that most will form the vacuum very quickly, but sometimes it is within a few hours (as the jelly cools). As with any other canning method, any jars that do not seal must be refrigerated.
Good luck and happy jelly making!.
Sorry but this is NOT an acceptable method for preserving Jams and Jellies. Yes they may seal, but it is not what is required to kill off bacteria.They need at least a 5 minute water bath.
Sorry but I spent 25 years as an Extension Home Economist...teaching this stuff:)
Here is a factsheet on jams and Jellies. HEre is one for uncooked ones.
 

GeorgiaGirl

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Well I use the Sure Jell Pectin box recipes for my jams and have had great success but you MUST follow the recipe to a tee! Just use the reg. canning jars. I do not have a canner, but have found through other methods of how to create a good seal with the jars. Here goes:
Of course you clean the jars and lids prior to use, then keep the jars in a pot with hot water, place the sealing lids in a 2nd pan with water, boil then just keep in hot water while making your jam. As directed in the jam recipe, pour into jars, then immediately place the sealing lids on each and then tighten the lid ring in place. Next turn sealed jars upside down in a sink of warm water (filled at least 1/3 prior to adding jars). Let sit for 10 - 15 minutes then remove all jars from water and place right side up. I find that most will form the vacuum very quickly, but sometimes it is within a few hours (as the jelly cools). As with any other canning method, any jars that do not seal must be refrigerated.
Good luck and happy jelly making!.
Sorry but this is NOT an acceptable method for preserving Jams and Jellies. Yes they may seal, but it is not what is required to kill off bacteria.They need at least a 5 minute water bath.
Sorry but I spent 25 years as an Extension Home Economist...teaching this stuff:)
Here is a factsheet on jams and Jellies. HEre is one for uncooked ones.
.
catlady said:
Sorry but this is NOT an acceptable method for preserving Jams and Jellies. Yes they may seal, but it is not what is required to kill off bacteria.They need at least a 5 minute water bath.
Sorry but I spent 25 years as an Extension Home Economist...teaching this stuff:)
Here is a factsheet on jams and Jellies. HEre is one for uncooked ones.
Can I ask you question? I made some Grape Jelly on July 23rd. One batch set but the other didn't. The Ball Pectin says if after 2 weeks it doesn't set you can re-make it. I'm wondering since it's been 4 weeks have I waited too long? Or it is safe to re-make and eat??? Thanks!
 

scrambled_eggs

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Well I use the Sure Jell Pectin box recipes for my jams and have had great success but you MUST follow the recipe to a tee! Just use the reg. canning jars. I do not have a canner, but have found through other methods of how to create a good seal with the jars. Here goes:
Of course you clean the jars and lids prior to use, then keep the jars in a pot with hot water, place the sealing lids in a 2nd pan with water, boil then just keep in hot water while making your jam. As directed in the jam recipe, pour into jars, then immediately place the sealing lids on each and then tighten the lid ring in place. Next turn sealed jars upside down in a sink of warm water (filled at least 1/3 prior to adding jars). Let sit for 10 - 15 minutes then remove all jars from water and place right side up. I find that most will form the vacuum very quickly, but sometimes it is within a few hours (as the jelly cools). As with any other canning method, any jars that do not seal must be refrigerated.
Good luck and happy jelly making!.
I would agree that this might not be the best way to do this. I use the canner and boil for 15 minutes when I make jam or preserves. The lids always seal and the product has never spoiled on me.
 

EmptyNest

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Well I use the Sure Jell Pectin box recipes for my jams and have had great success but you MUST follow the recipe to a tee! Just use the reg. canning jars. I do not have a canner, but have found through other methods of how to create a good seal with the jars. Here goes:
Of course you clean the jars and lids prior to use, then keep the jars in a pot with hot water, place the sealing lids in a 2nd pan with water, boil then just keep in hot water while making your jam. As directed in the jam recipe, pour into jars, then immediately place the sealing lids on each and then tighten the lid ring in place. Next turn sealed jars upside down in a sink of warm water (filled at least 1/3 prior to adding jars). Let sit for 10 - 15 minutes then remove all jars from water and place right side up. I find that most will form the vacuum very quickly, but sometimes it is within a few hours (as the jelly cools). As with any other canning method, any jars that do not seal must be refrigerated.
Good luck and happy jelly making!.
Sorry but this is NOT an acceptable method for preserving Jams and Jellies. Yes they may seal, but it is not what is required to kill off bacteria.They need at least a 5 minute water bath.
Sorry but I spent 25 years as an Extension Home Economist...teaching this stuff:)
Here is a factsheet on jams and Jellies. HEre is one for uncooked ones.
.
catlady said:
Sorry but this is NOT an acceptable method for preserving Jams and Jellies. Yes they may seal, but it is not what is required to kill off bacteria.They need at least a 5 minute water bath.
Sorry but I spent 25 years as an Extension Home Economist...teaching this stuff:)
Here is a factsheet on jams and Jellies. HEre is one for uncooked ones.
Can I ask you question? I made some Grape Jelly on July 23rd. One batch set but the other didn't. The Ball Pectin says if after 2 weeks it doesn't set you can re-make it. I'm wondering since it's been 4 weeks have I waited too long? Or it is safe to re-make and eat??? Thanks!
.
4 weeks is a pretty long time.If it were me...I wouldn't redo after this long a time. Have you had it refrigerated? DId you water bath it? If not, then I would be leary of it. But here are methods for remaking
 

GeorgiaGirl

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Well I use the Sure Jell Pectin box recipes for my jams and have had great success but you MUST follow the recipe to a tee! Just use the reg. canning jars. I do not have a canner, but have found through other methods of how to create a good seal with the jars. Here goes:
Of course you clean the jars and lids prior to use, then keep the jars in a pot with hot water, place the sealing lids in a 2nd pan with water, boil then just keep in hot water while making your jam. As directed in the jam recipe, pour into jars, then immediately place the sealing lids on each and then tighten the lid ring in place. Next turn sealed jars upside down in a sink of warm water (filled at least 1/3 prior to adding jars). Let sit for 10 - 15 minutes then remove all jars from water and place right side up. I find that most will form the vacuum very quickly, but sometimes it is within a few hours (as the jelly cools). As with any other canning method, any jars that do not seal must be refrigerated.
Good luck and happy jelly making!.
Sorry but this is NOT an acceptable method for preserving Jams and Jellies. Yes they may seal, but it is not what is required to kill off bacteria.They need at least a 5 minute water bath.
Sorry but I spent 25 years as an Extension Home Economist...teaching this stuff:)
Here is a factsheet on jams and Jellies. HEre is one for uncooked ones.
.
catlady said:
Sorry but this is NOT an acceptable method for preserving Jams and Jellies. Yes they may seal, but it is not what is required to kill off bacteria.They need at least a 5 minute water bath.
Sorry but I spent 25 years as an Extension Home Economist...teaching this stuff:)
Here is a factsheet on jams and Jellies. HEre is one for uncooked ones.
Can I ask you question? I made some Grape Jelly on July 23rd. One batch set but the other didn't. The Ball Pectin says if after 2 weeks it doesn't set you can re-make it. I'm wondering since it's been 4 weeks have I waited too long? Or it is safe to re-make and eat??? Thanks!
.
4 weeks is a pretty long time.If it were me...I wouldn't redo after this long a time. Have you had it refrigerated? DId you water bath it? If not, then I would be leary of it. But here are methods for remaking
.
catlady said:
4 weeks is a pretty long time.If it were me...I wouldn't redo after this long a time. Have you had it refrigerated? DId you water bath it? If not, then I would be leary of it. But here are methods for remaking
First, thanks for the link! No, it has not been refrigerated, I was actually hoping it would just firm up then after awhile I forgot about it, until this thread! But yes, it was water bathed when I made it. If you don't think it would be safe I will just throw it away, it was a small batch, 6 jars so I won't feel too bad. I would feel worse if we got sick

 

EmptyNest

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Well I use the Sure Jell Pectin box recipes for my jams and have had great success but you MUST follow the recipe to a tee! Just use the reg. canning jars. I do not have a canner, but have found through other methods of how to create a good seal with the jars. Here goes:
Of course you clean the jars and lids prior to use, then keep the jars in a pot with hot water, place the sealing lids in a 2nd pan with water, boil then just keep in hot water while making your jam. As directed in the jam recipe, pour into jars, then immediately place the sealing lids on each and then tighten the lid ring in place. Next turn sealed jars upside down in a sink of warm water (filled at least 1/3 prior to adding jars). Let sit for 10 - 15 minutes then remove all jars from water and place right side up. I find that most will form the vacuum very quickly, but sometimes it is within a few hours (as the jelly cools). As with any other canning method, any jars that do not seal must be refrigerated.
Good luck and happy jelly making!.
Sorry but this is NOT an acceptable method for preserving Jams and Jellies. Yes they may seal, but it is not what is required to kill off bacteria.They need at least a 5 minute water bath.
Sorry but I spent 25 years as an Extension Home Economist...teaching this stuff:)
Here is a factsheet on jams and Jellies. HEre is one for uncooked ones.
.
catlady said:
Sorry but this is NOT an acceptable method for preserving Jams and Jellies. Yes they may seal, but it is not what is required to kill off bacteria.They need at least a 5 minute water bath.
Sorry but I spent 25 years as an Extension Home Economist...teaching this stuff:)
Here is a factsheet on jams and Jellies. HEre is one for uncooked ones.
Can I ask you question? I made some Grape Jelly on July 23rd. One batch set but the other didn't. The Ball Pectin says if after 2 weeks it doesn't set you can re-make it. I'm wondering since it's been 4 weeks have I waited too long? Or it is safe to re-make and eat??? Thanks!
.
4 weeks is a pretty long time.If it were me...I wouldn't redo after this long a time. Have you had it refrigerated? DId you water bath it? If not, then I would be leary of it. But here are methods for remaking
.
catlady said:
4 weeks is a pretty long time.If it were me...I wouldn't redo after this long a time. Have you had it refrigerated? DId you water bath it? If not, then I would be leary of it. But here are methods for remaking
First, thanks for the link! No, it has not been refrigerated, I was actually hoping it would just firm up then after awhile I forgot about it, until this thread! But yes, it was water bathed when I made it. If you don't think it would be safe I will just throw it away, it was a small batch, 6 jars so I won't feel too bad. I would feel worse if we got sick

.
If it was waterbathed, and it sealed properly...it just didn't set.......then I would say you are probably ok then to at least give it a shot again. My concern was that it was just put in jars with no processing. if not... then bacteria could be growing in the unprocessed jars.
 

Penelope

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four at four forty four said:
Anyone have a favorite recipe? or can direct me some place to find one?
Lots of places to find recipes: www.ballcanning.com is a good one. There is also one at www.pickyourown.com
My suggestion to you is this: As long as your proportions are correct (fruit to sugar to pectin) GO CRAZY. Make different jams. I used to make an "end of the season" jam... anything I had left from the end of one season I would put into the jam I made at the beginning of the next season.
Now, don't go getting wierd thinking I mean 'years' when I say 'seasons'. Living in the middle of the country has wonderful fruit rewards. As rhubarb is going out, strawberries are coming in. As black raspberries are going out, blueberries are coming in. I would make up my own jams and they were always a hit. One time, I did red raspberry, black raspberry, blueberry. I COULD NOT keep a supply of it up. People would hunt me down at the farmers market and buy every jar I had on the table. It was bizarre. One time, I had people forming a line, waiting for me to get my table set up so that they could buy my jams/jellies before they were gone!
Take some chances and taste it first with your mind. You know what all of the flavors taste like, so get creative.
Like I said in an earlier post, any oopsies are wonderful over ice cream. Or, in your case, thin them with a little water or juice, and serve them on pancakes at your B&B!
 

muirford

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four at four forty four said:
Anyone have a favorite recipe? or can direct me some place to find one?
Lots of places to find recipes: www.ballcanning.com is a good one. There is also one at www.pickyourown.com
My suggestion to you is this: As long as your proportions are correct (fruit to sugar to pectin) GO CRAZY. Make different jams. I used to make an "end of the season" jam... anything I had left from the end of one season I would put into the jam I made at the beginning of the next season.
Now, don't go getting wierd thinking I mean 'years' when I say 'seasons'. Living in the middle of the country has wonderful fruit rewards. As rhubarb is going out, strawberries are coming in. As black raspberries are going out, blueberries are coming in. I would make up my own jams and they were always a hit. One time, I did red raspberry, black raspberry, blueberry. I COULD NOT keep a supply of it up. People would hunt me down at the farmers market and buy every jar I had on the table. It was bizarre. One time, I had people forming a line, waiting for me to get my table set up so that they could buy my jams/jellies before they were gone!
Take some chances and taste it first with your mind. You know what all of the flavors taste like, so get creative.
Like I said in an earlier post, any oopsies are wonderful over ice cream. Or, in your case, thin them with a little water or juice, and serve them on pancakes at your B&B!.
penelope said:
Like I said in an earlier post, any oopsies are wonderful over ice cream. Or, in your case, thin them with a little water or juice, and serve them on pancakes at your B&B!
I have a small arbor of concord grapes in the back yard. The first year I made freezer jam it never completely jelled, so when I defrosted it I put it in a squeeze bottle and used it over melon slices or to decorate plates. Still tastes good.
 

JBloggs

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four at four forty four said:
Anyone have a favorite recipe? or can direct me some place to find one?
Lots of places to find recipes: www.ballcanning.com is a good one. There is also one at www.pickyourown.com
My suggestion to you is this: As long as your proportions are correct (fruit to sugar to pectin) GO CRAZY. Make different jams. I used to make an "end of the season" jam... anything I had left from the end of one season I would put into the jam I made at the beginning of the next season.
Now, don't go getting wierd thinking I mean 'years' when I say 'seasons'. Living in the middle of the country has wonderful fruit rewards. As rhubarb is going out, strawberries are coming in. As black raspberries are going out, blueberries are coming in. I would make up my own jams and they were always a hit. One time, I did red raspberry, black raspberry, blueberry. I COULD NOT keep a supply of it up. People would hunt me down at the farmers market and buy every jar I had on the table. It was bizarre. One time, I had people forming a line, waiting for me to get my table set up so that they could buy my jams/jellies before they were gone!
Take some chances and taste it first with your mind. You know what all of the flavors taste like, so get creative.
Like I said in an earlier post, any oopsies are wonderful over ice cream. Or, in your case, thin them with a little water or juice, and serve them on pancakes at your B&B!.
penelope said:
Like I said in an earlier post, any oopsies are wonderful over ice cream. Or, in your case, thin them with a little water or juice, and serve them on pancakes at your B&B!
I have a small arbor of concord grapes in the back yard. The first year I made freezer jam it never completely jelled, so when I defrosted it I put it in a squeeze bottle and used it over melon slices or to decorate plates. Still tastes good.
.
muirford said:
penelope said:
Like I said in an earlier post, any oopsies are wonderful over ice cream. Or, in your case, thin them with a little water or juice, and serve them on pancakes at your B&B!
I have a small arbor of concord grapes in the back yard. The first year I made freezer jam it never completely jelled, so when I defrosted it I put it in a squeeze bottle and used it over melon slices or to decorate plates. Still tastes good.
or ice cream topping!
I love concord grapes
 

SeeBen21

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I guess there are already enough suggestions about recipe and I would have to translate my recipe into English.
Your second question is more a preserving question. Did you ever heard about the company “Weck”?
It’s a German company who are selling canning supplies for about 100 years; yes the system is already 100 years old. Everything you caned will last quite long.
I was eating some jam from my grandmother which was already 4 years old and she had some jars which were already over 10 years old and still ate able but not really tasteful anymore. It’s all a matter of proper sealing and storing.
Just have a look at following link there are much more detailed information available. I can strongly recommend this method.
http://www.weckcanning.com/
 

EmptyNest

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four at four forty four said:
Anyone have a favorite recipe? or can direct me some place to find one?
Lots of places to find recipes: www.ballcanning.com is a good one. There is also one at www.pickyourown.com
My suggestion to you is this: As long as your proportions are correct (fruit to sugar to pectin) GO CRAZY. Make different jams. I used to make an "end of the season" jam... anything I had left from the end of one season I would put into the jam I made at the beginning of the next season.
Now, don't go getting wierd thinking I mean 'years' when I say 'seasons'. Living in the middle of the country has wonderful fruit rewards. As rhubarb is going out, strawberries are coming in. As black raspberries are going out, blueberries are coming in. I would make up my own jams and they were always a hit. One time, I did red raspberry, black raspberry, blueberry. I COULD NOT keep a supply of it up. People would hunt me down at the farmers market and buy every jar I had on the table. It was bizarre. One time, I had people forming a line, waiting for me to get my table set up so that they could buy my jams/jellies before they were gone!
Take some chances and taste it first with your mind. You know what all of the flavors taste like, so get creative.
Like I said in an earlier post, any oopsies are wonderful over ice cream. Or, in your case, thin them with a little water or juice, and serve them on pancakes at your B&B!.
penelope said:
Like I said in an earlier post, any oopsies are wonderful over ice cream. Or, in your case, thin them with a little water or juice, and serve them on pancakes at your B&B!
I have a small arbor of concord grapes in the back yard. The first year I made freezer jam it never completely jelled, so when I defrosted it I put it in a squeeze bottle and used it over melon slices or to decorate plates. Still tastes good.
.
muirford said:
penelope said:
Like I said in an earlier post, any oopsies are wonderful over ice cream. Or, in your case, thin them with a little water or juice, and serve them on pancakes at your B&B!
I have a small arbor of concord grapes in the back yard. The first year I made freezer jam it never completely jelled, so when I defrosted it I put it in a squeeze bottle and used it over melon slices or to decorate plates. Still tastes good.
or ice cream topping!
I love concord grapes
.
We have a grape arbor over our swing. This year it is loaded with concord grapes. I may have to get down there and pick some if the birds haven't gotten too them yet:-(. Used to do that at my grandmothers house many many years ago and we would make grape jelly.
 

gillumhouse

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I have a small grape arbor. My second year here I made grap[e jelly and notices little hard things in it (not seeds). A friend here told me the juice had to be refrigerated first, and then made into jelly, it was the way it is with the grapes here. Did that and never had the "hard crystals" again.
I just make mine into grape juice. There are not a lot of grapes this year. Maybe it is time to cut them down again. DH took them down to the ground the first year - because they looked dead. Things do look dead in January/February!
 
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