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Innkeeper To Go

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When I read this, I could not help from saying "whoa, dude" outloud I found it so offensive.
Not only because of the way the innkeeper trashes Jay Karen for, heaven forbid, recommending that innkeepers make changes to accommodate the segment of the traveling public who are actually traveling.
But, well, here's the section that took my breath away
Innkeepers are nothing if not pretentious. Modern innkeeping has become a vain contest to see who can spend the most money on affectation and costly minutia. Add-ons and accoutrements weigh down innkeeping, obscuring the true nature of the innkeepers from the traveling public. If lodgers really knew who their innkeepers were, it’s unlikely they’d stay with them.
The amazing thing is that this was written on his inn's blog. Why on earth would that be appealing to any guest?
I'm completely baffled by this. Can anyone think of one possibly good outcome from such a post?
 

Eleanor Brown

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Wow, bizarre! He manages to insult the innkeepers and the guests at one fell swoop:
If innkeepers are contriving to create inns that don’t necessarily represent who they are as business people, then travelers are buying a contrived image created to separate them from their money. And who wants to do business with someone who is selling a contrived image? Perhaps someone who has a contrived image of themselves.
 

egoodell

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Wow, bizarre! He manages to insult the innkeepers and the guests at one fell swoop:
If innkeepers are contriving to create inns that don’t necessarily represent who they are as business people, then travelers are buying a contrived image created to separate them from their money. And who wants to do business with someone who is selling a contrived image? Perhaps someone who has a contrived image of themselves..
Sure does not want me to buy his book!
Riki
 

EmptyNest

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Height of ski season..and they show all rooms available...hmmmm what does that tell you????
 

egoodell

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Height of ski season..and they show all rooms available...hmmmm what does that tell you????.
Yes, when I read it it sure seemed to spell out "sour grapes" to me.
RIki
 

Morticia

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Isn't this from the place that's for sale that appalled everyone last week? If not, they're twins.
What this does is speak to the part of the market that believes the way this innkeeper does.
Never mind, I just hovered over the link to see what blog it was and these folks have been ranting for awhile.
 

JBloggs

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ITG I think that one quote is taking it out of context and the majority of what the author is saying is accurate. I agree that one quote does not sound good, but the overall article does have compelling arguments.
He wrote and I agree - and do not find any of this offensive: "If innkeepers are seeking success, they’d do well to remember that people identify and appreciate honesty, and they’ll reward that in the long run. If innkeepers chase money through fads, it won’t matter how well they market to whatever demographic they’re told holds the key to their success, because they’ll end up looking like people who are trying to be something they’re not. Be yourself; you’re the show."
If lodgers knew...yes, I also agree with that comment. There are a few innkeepers I would not want to stay with. I am sure you all can say the same. I wish all innkeepers were fantastic, but it is not true - Mort told us about the burnt toast no heat no care Innkeepers.
Not all of us are older innkeepers - agreed, not all of us can or should follow every trend as suggested by Jay's article agreed. I believe that this author in his location is probably very competitive with other inns who are Joneses, they get a new website with flash - the rest get a new website with flash, they get a video - the rest get a video. We discuss these here all the time. Jacuzzi tubs - a major expense being one of those amenities we have discussed. It is not like we can just go out and put them in the rooms.
His book also makes sense to me -
The Innkeeper's Husband: Undercover With an Unconventional Innkeeper [/h1]
:
Product Description[/h3]"Everybody wants to be an innkeeper. Everybody wants to live in an idyllic and beautiful location and make pancakes and stuffed French toast for exotic guests who have interesting experiences to share. Everybody loves the fantasy of innkeeping. But the reality couldn’t be further from that dream. In The Innkeeper’s Husband, long-time innkeeper and writer Shawn Kerivan takes us on an unexpected ride filled with obnoxious guests, faulty plumbing, and financial uncertainty. The Innkeeper’s Husband is a funny and heartbreaking behind the scenes look at the intersection of dreams and reality.
The Innkeeper’s Husband chronicles the journey of a young couple who set out to marry their love of skiing with a low-stress way of life. Their solution? Buying an old inn and fixing it up. Shawn and his wife, Chantal, soon discovered that in the spectrum of small businesses, innkeeping ranks as one of the most challenging to survive. They soon find themselves dealing with everything from the brink of financial ruin to peeling paint—and that’s before a state inspector discovers that their 170-year old building isn’t “up to code.”
After reading The Innkeeper’s Husband, you’ll never think about traveling the way you used to."
Link here
 

wendydk

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I'm glad to see that he does not have a link to his blog on his website...the blog appears to be oriented toward innkeepers, not guests.
In some respects, I agree with him...many B&B's lose their individuality in the rush to offer what everyone else does. And I hate being told that I have to offer or do things I don't want to. On the other hand, holding out on needed changes out of plain old stubborness (like insisting that the Innkeeper is the ONLY important thing) will leave you behind.
Successful Innkeeping is a difficult balance and it's so important to know who you are and to promote how you're different from other Inns (in a good way) and recognize how you can improve to compete without becoming a twin of the Inn down the road.
Some things Innkeepers feel like they HAVE to do (that I currently don't): have some kind of evening "reception", have fresh flowers all the time in the Inn, offer romance and other packages, have facebook and twitter accounts and a blog...and the list goes on and on.
If I had 28 B&B's in a highly seasonal area in a crappy economy, I might develop a snarly attitude too, but he did cross the line by putting down other innkeepers...I think he needs an innkeeping forum like this one...helps to open one's mind and helps one to not feel so isolated.
 

egoodell

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ITG I think that one quote is taking it out of context and the majority of what the author is saying is accurate. I agree that one quote does not sound good, but the overall article does have compelling arguments.
He wrote and I agree - and do not find any of this offensive: "If innkeepers are seeking success, they’d do well to remember that people identify and appreciate honesty, and they’ll reward that in the long run. If innkeepers chase money through fads, it won’t matter how well they market to whatever demographic they’re told holds the key to their success, because they’ll end up looking like people who are trying to be something they’re not. Be yourself; you’re the show."
If lodgers knew...yes, I also agree with that comment. There are a few innkeepers I would not want to stay with. I am sure you all can say the same. I wish all innkeepers were fantastic, but it is not true - Mort told us about the burnt toast no heat no care Innkeepers.
Not all of us are older innkeepers - agreed, not all of us can or should follow every trend as suggested by Jay's article agreed. I believe that this author in his location is probably very competitive with other inns who are Joneses, they get a new website with flash - the rest get a new website with flash, they get a video - the rest get a video. We discuss these here all the time. Jacuzzi tubs - a major expense being one of those amenities we have discussed. It is not like we can just go out and put them in the rooms.
His book also makes sense to me -
The Innkeeper's Husband: Undercover With an Unconventional Innkeeper [/h1]
:
Product Description[/h3]"Everybody wants to be an innkeeper. Everybody wants to live in an idyllic and beautiful location and make pancakes and stuffed French toast for exotic guests who have interesting experiences to share. Everybody loves the fantasy of innkeeping. But the reality couldn’t be further from that dream. In The Innkeeper’s Husband, long-time innkeeper and writer Shawn Kerivan takes us on an unexpected ride filled with obnoxious guests, faulty plumbing, and financial uncertainty. The Innkeeper’s Husband is a funny and heartbreaking behind the scenes look at the intersection of dreams and reality.
The Innkeeper’s Husband chronicles the journey of a young couple who set out to marry their love of skiing with a low-stress way of life. Their solution? Buying an old inn and fixing it up. Shawn and his wife, Chantal, soon discovered that in the spectrum of small businesses, innkeeping ranks as one of the most challenging to survive. They soon find themselves dealing with everything from the brink of financial ruin to peeling paint—and that’s before a state inspector discovers that their 170-year old building isn’t “up to code.”
After reading The Innkeeper’s Husband, you’ll never think about traveling the way you used to."
Link here
.
No I still think although there are bits of sense in there, it still sounds like sour grapes.
Not all inns keep up with the Jonses. I do what is wanted and enjoyed here.
I do my own website. When I do have the money to have someone help me, I still will keep it simple, as that's what I think draws my guests.
And I supply an escape. There is nothing wrong with that. We don't always want "realism" when we vacation. I get folks who want to escape from the stress of work and everyday real life.
And there is nothing wrong or phoney about that.
RIki
 

EmptyNest

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ITG I think that one quote is taking it out of context and the majority of what the author is saying is accurate. I agree that one quote does not sound good, but the overall article does have compelling arguments.
He wrote and I agree - and do not find any of this offensive: "If innkeepers are seeking success, they’d do well to remember that people identify and appreciate honesty, and they’ll reward that in the long run. If innkeepers chase money through fads, it won’t matter how well they market to whatever demographic they’re told holds the key to their success, because they’ll end up looking like people who are trying to be something they’re not. Be yourself; you’re the show."
If lodgers knew...yes, I also agree with that comment. There are a few innkeepers I would not want to stay with. I am sure you all can say the same. I wish all innkeepers were fantastic, but it is not true - Mort told us about the burnt toast no heat no care Innkeepers.
Not all of us are older innkeepers - agreed, not all of us can or should follow every trend as suggested by Jay's article agreed. I believe that this author in his location is probably very competitive with other inns who are Joneses, they get a new website with flash - the rest get a new website with flash, they get a video - the rest get a video. We discuss these here all the time. Jacuzzi tubs - a major expense being one of those amenities we have discussed. It is not like we can just go out and put them in the rooms.
His book also makes sense to me -
The Innkeeper's Husband: Undercover With an Unconventional Innkeeper [/h1]
:
Product Description[/h3]"Everybody wants to be an innkeeper. Everybody wants to live in an idyllic and beautiful location and make pancakes and stuffed French toast for exotic guests who have interesting experiences to share. Everybody loves the fantasy of innkeeping. But the reality couldn’t be further from that dream. In The Innkeeper’s Husband, long-time innkeeper and writer Shawn Kerivan takes us on an unexpected ride filled with obnoxious guests, faulty plumbing, and financial uncertainty. The Innkeeper’s Husband is a funny and heartbreaking behind the scenes look at the intersection of dreams and reality.
The Innkeeper’s Husband chronicles the journey of a young couple who set out to marry their love of skiing with a low-stress way of life. Their solution? Buying an old inn and fixing it up. Shawn and his wife, Chantal, soon discovered that in the spectrum of small businesses, innkeeping ranks as one of the most challenging to survive. They soon find themselves dealing with everything from the brink of financial ruin to peeling paint—and that’s before a state inspector discovers that their 170-year old building isn’t “up to code.”
After reading The Innkeeper’s Husband, you’ll never think about traveling the way you used to."
Link here
.
I guess I do have to agree with some of what he/ you said...but overall, his tone leaves much to be desired.
 

egoodell

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ITG I think that one quote is taking it out of context and the majority of what the author is saying is accurate. I agree that one quote does not sound good, but the overall article does have compelling arguments.
He wrote and I agree - and do not find any of this offensive: "If innkeepers are seeking success, they’d do well to remember that people identify and appreciate honesty, and they’ll reward that in the long run. If innkeepers chase money through fads, it won’t matter how well they market to whatever demographic they’re told holds the key to their success, because they’ll end up looking like people who are trying to be something they’re not. Be yourself; you’re the show."
If lodgers knew...yes, I also agree with that comment. There are a few innkeepers I would not want to stay with. I am sure you all can say the same. I wish all innkeepers were fantastic, but it is not true - Mort told us about the burnt toast no heat no care Innkeepers.
Not all of us are older innkeepers - agreed, not all of us can or should follow every trend as suggested by Jay's article agreed. I believe that this author in his location is probably very competitive with other inns who are Joneses, they get a new website with flash - the rest get a new website with flash, they get a video - the rest get a video. We discuss these here all the time. Jacuzzi tubs - a major expense being one of those amenities we have discussed. It is not like we can just go out and put them in the rooms.
His book also makes sense to me -
The Innkeeper's Husband: Undercover With an Unconventional Innkeeper [/h1]
:
Product Description[/h3]"Everybody wants to be an innkeeper. Everybody wants to live in an idyllic and beautiful location and make pancakes and stuffed French toast for exotic guests who have interesting experiences to share. Everybody loves the fantasy of innkeeping. But the reality couldn’t be further from that dream. In The Innkeeper’s Husband, long-time innkeeper and writer Shawn Kerivan takes us on an unexpected ride filled with obnoxious guests, faulty plumbing, and financial uncertainty. The Innkeeper’s Husband is a funny and heartbreaking behind the scenes look at the intersection of dreams and reality.
The Innkeeper’s Husband chronicles the journey of a young couple who set out to marry their love of skiing with a low-stress way of life. Their solution? Buying an old inn and fixing it up. Shawn and his wife, Chantal, soon discovered that in the spectrum of small businesses, innkeeping ranks as one of the most challenging to survive. They soon find themselves dealing with everything from the brink of financial ruin to peeling paint—and that’s before a state inspector discovers that their 170-year old building isn’t “up to code.”
After reading The Innkeeper’s Husband, you’ll never think about traveling the way you used to."
Link here
.
I guess I do have to agree with some of what he/ you said...but overall, his tone leaves much to be desired.
.
Maybe his book is not selling and this it a way to try and promote it?
RIki
 

Morticia

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ITG I think that one quote is taking it out of context and the majority of what the author is saying is accurate. I agree that one quote does not sound good, but the overall article does have compelling arguments.
He wrote and I agree - and do not find any of this offensive: "If innkeepers are seeking success, they’d do well to remember that people identify and appreciate honesty, and they’ll reward that in the long run. If innkeepers chase money through fads, it won’t matter how well they market to whatever demographic they’re told holds the key to their success, because they’ll end up looking like people who are trying to be something they’re not. Be yourself; you’re the show."
If lodgers knew...yes, I also agree with that comment. There are a few innkeepers I would not want to stay with. I am sure you all can say the same. I wish all innkeepers were fantastic, but it is not true - Mort told us about the burnt toast no heat no care Innkeepers.
Not all of us are older innkeepers - agreed, not all of us can or should follow every trend as suggested by Jay's article agreed. I believe that this author in his location is probably very competitive with other inns who are Joneses, they get a new website with flash - the rest get a new website with flash, they get a video - the rest get a video. We discuss these here all the time. Jacuzzi tubs - a major expense being one of those amenities we have discussed. It is not like we can just go out and put them in the rooms.
His book also makes sense to me -
The Innkeeper's Husband: Undercover With an Unconventional Innkeeper [/h1]
:
Product Description[/h3]"Everybody wants to be an innkeeper. Everybody wants to live in an idyllic and beautiful location and make pancakes and stuffed French toast for exotic guests who have interesting experiences to share. Everybody loves the fantasy of innkeeping. But the reality couldn’t be further from that dream. In The Innkeeper’s Husband, long-time innkeeper and writer Shawn Kerivan takes us on an unexpected ride filled with obnoxious guests, faulty plumbing, and financial uncertainty. The Innkeeper’s Husband is a funny and heartbreaking behind the scenes look at the intersection of dreams and reality.
The Innkeeper’s Husband chronicles the journey of a young couple who set out to marry their love of skiing with a low-stress way of life. Their solution? Buying an old inn and fixing it up. Shawn and his wife, Chantal, soon discovered that in the spectrum of small businesses, innkeeping ranks as one of the most challenging to survive. They soon find themselves dealing with everything from the brink of financial ruin to peeling paint—and that’s before a state inspector discovers that their 170-year old building isn’t “up to code.”
After reading The Innkeeper’s Husband, you’ll never think about traveling the way you used to."
Link here
.
That is absolutely one tough market. We looked at 2 places not far from where this inn is located. Not sure what they are doing now, but the ones we looked at were not spiffed up in any way. They were all 'ski lodge' kinds of places. The one amenity offered was the hot tub. (OK, just looked and neither of the places we looked at has really updated their site. One has added a slide show and their TA reviews, otherwise, same site. And they added the names of the new owners.)
We told some friends who are in the restaurant biz where we were looking (their restaurant is about 15 miles from Stowe) and they told us to run, not walk.
If anyone thinks we have horror stories, it's much worse when you're in a 'party' town.
 

JBloggs

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ITG I think that one quote is taking it out of context and the majority of what the author is saying is accurate. I agree that one quote does not sound good, but the overall article does have compelling arguments.
He wrote and I agree - and do not find any of this offensive: "If innkeepers are seeking success, they’d do well to remember that people identify and appreciate honesty, and they’ll reward that in the long run. If innkeepers chase money through fads, it won’t matter how well they market to whatever demographic they’re told holds the key to their success, because they’ll end up looking like people who are trying to be something they’re not. Be yourself; you’re the show."
If lodgers knew...yes, I also agree with that comment. There are a few innkeepers I would not want to stay with. I am sure you all can say the same. I wish all innkeepers were fantastic, but it is not true - Mort told us about the burnt toast no heat no care Innkeepers.
Not all of us are older innkeepers - agreed, not all of us can or should follow every trend as suggested by Jay's article agreed. I believe that this author in his location is probably very competitive with other inns who are Joneses, they get a new website with flash - the rest get a new website with flash, they get a video - the rest get a video. We discuss these here all the time. Jacuzzi tubs - a major expense being one of those amenities we have discussed. It is not like we can just go out and put them in the rooms.
His book also makes sense to me -
The Innkeeper's Husband: Undercover With an Unconventional Innkeeper [/h1]
:
Product Description[/h3]"Everybody wants to be an innkeeper. Everybody wants to live in an idyllic and beautiful location and make pancakes and stuffed French toast for exotic guests who have interesting experiences to share. Everybody loves the fantasy of innkeeping. But the reality couldn’t be further from that dream. In The Innkeeper’s Husband, long-time innkeeper and writer Shawn Kerivan takes us on an unexpected ride filled with obnoxious guests, faulty plumbing, and financial uncertainty. The Innkeeper’s Husband is a funny and heartbreaking behind the scenes look at the intersection of dreams and reality.
The Innkeeper’s Husband chronicles the journey of a young couple who set out to marry their love of skiing with a low-stress way of life. Their solution? Buying an old inn and fixing it up. Shawn and his wife, Chantal, soon discovered that in the spectrum of small businesses, innkeeping ranks as one of the most challenging to survive. They soon find themselves dealing with everything from the brink of financial ruin to peeling paint—and that’s before a state inspector discovers that their 170-year old building isn’t “up to code.”
After reading The Innkeeper’s Husband, you’ll never think about traveling the way you used to."
Link here
.
No I still think although there are bits of sense in there, it still sounds like sour grapes.
Not all inns keep up with the Jonses. I do what is wanted and enjoyed here.
I do my own website. When I do have the money to have someone help me, I still will keep it simple, as that's what I think draws my guests.
And I supply an escape. There is nothing wrong with that. We don't always want "realism" when we vacation. I get folks who want to escape from the stress of work and everyday real life.
And there is nothing wrong or phoney about that.
RIki
.
egoodell said:
No I still think although there are bits of sense in there, it still sounds like sour grapes.
Not all inns keep up with the Jonses. I do what is wanted and enjoyed here.
I do my own website. When I do have the money to have someone help me, I still will keep it simple, as that's what I think draws my guests.
And I supply an escape. There is nothing wrong with that. We don't always want "realism" when we vacation. I get folks who want to escape from the stress of work and everyday real life.
And there is nothing wrong or phoney about that.
RIki
See the problem with posting it on THIS forum is you all think he is talking to you. He is replying and giving his take on the article Jay wrote. He is not coming after anyone here and putting them down. He is disagreeing with the article and that is his prerogative. The right thing to do would be to let JAY address his comments. Looking at his bookings etc, is not on. You all are the first to tell everyone - we can all have our own opinions.
Maybe his tone was not appealing, but what he said in general made sense.
 

wendydk

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ITG I think that one quote is taking it out of context and the majority of what the author is saying is accurate. I agree that one quote does not sound good, but the overall article does have compelling arguments.
He wrote and I agree - and do not find any of this offensive: "If innkeepers are seeking success, they’d do well to remember that people identify and appreciate honesty, and they’ll reward that in the long run. If innkeepers chase money through fads, it won’t matter how well they market to whatever demographic they’re told holds the key to their success, because they’ll end up looking like people who are trying to be something they’re not. Be yourself; you’re the show."
If lodgers knew...yes, I also agree with that comment. There are a few innkeepers I would not want to stay with. I am sure you all can say the same. I wish all innkeepers were fantastic, but it is not true - Mort told us about the burnt toast no heat no care Innkeepers.
Not all of us are older innkeepers - agreed, not all of us can or should follow every trend as suggested by Jay's article agreed. I believe that this author in his location is probably very competitive with other inns who are Joneses, they get a new website with flash - the rest get a new website with flash, they get a video - the rest get a video. We discuss these here all the time. Jacuzzi tubs - a major expense being one of those amenities we have discussed. It is not like we can just go out and put them in the rooms.
His book also makes sense to me -
The Innkeeper's Husband: Undercover With an Unconventional Innkeeper [/h1]
:
Product Description[/h3]"Everybody wants to be an innkeeper. Everybody wants to live in an idyllic and beautiful location and make pancakes and stuffed French toast for exotic guests who have interesting experiences to share. Everybody loves the fantasy of innkeeping. But the reality couldn’t be further from that dream. In The Innkeeper’s Husband, long-time innkeeper and writer Shawn Kerivan takes us on an unexpected ride filled with obnoxious guests, faulty plumbing, and financial uncertainty. The Innkeeper’s Husband is a funny and heartbreaking behind the scenes look at the intersection of dreams and reality.
The Innkeeper’s Husband chronicles the journey of a young couple who set out to marry their love of skiing with a low-stress way of life. Their solution? Buying an old inn and fixing it up. Shawn and his wife, Chantal, soon discovered that in the spectrum of small businesses, innkeeping ranks as one of the most challenging to survive. They soon find themselves dealing with everything from the brink of financial ruin to peeling paint—and that’s before a state inspector discovers that their 170-year old building isn’t “up to code.”
After reading The Innkeeper’s Husband, you’ll never think about traveling the way you used to."
Link here
.
No I still think although there are bits of sense in there, it still sounds like sour grapes.
Not all inns keep up with the Jonses. I do what is wanted and enjoyed here.
I do my own website. When I do have the money to have someone help me, I still will keep it simple, as that's what I think draws my guests.
And I supply an escape. There is nothing wrong with that. We don't always want "realism" when we vacation. I get folks who want to escape from the stress of work and everyday real life.
And there is nothing wrong or phoney about that.
RIki
.
egoodell said:
No I still think although there are bits of sense in there, it still sounds like sour grapes.
Not all inns keep up with the Jonses. I do what is wanted and enjoyed here.
I do my own website. When I do have the money to have someone help me, I still will keep it simple, as that's what I think draws my guests.
And I supply an escape. There is nothing wrong with that. We don't always want "realism" when we vacation. I get folks who want to escape from the stress of work and everyday real life.
And there is nothing wrong or phoney about that.
RIki
See the problem with posting it on THIS forum is you all think he is talking to you. He is replying and giving his take on the article Jay wrote. He is not coming after anyone here and putting them down. He is disagreeing with the article and that is his prerogative. The right thing to do would be to let JAY address his comments. Looking at his bookings etc, is not on. You all are the first to tell everyone - we can all have our own opinions.
Maybe his tone was not appealing, but what he said in general made sense.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
The problem with posting it on THIS forum is you all think he is talking to you. He is replying and giving his take on the article Jay wrote. He is not coming after anyone here and putting them down.
And, given his area and it's competition, I'm sure he's talking about his trials trying to fit in, but still maintain his own identity. When he puts down innkeepers, you can bet he has a few in particular in mind.
 

muirford

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ITG I think that one quote is taking it out of context and the majority of what the author is saying is accurate. I agree that one quote does not sound good, but the overall article does have compelling arguments.
He wrote and I agree - and do not find any of this offensive: "If innkeepers are seeking success, they’d do well to remember that people identify and appreciate honesty, and they’ll reward that in the long run. If innkeepers chase money through fads, it won’t matter how well they market to whatever demographic they’re told holds the key to their success, because they’ll end up looking like people who are trying to be something they’re not. Be yourself; you’re the show."
If lodgers knew...yes, I also agree with that comment. There are a few innkeepers I would not want to stay with. I am sure you all can say the same. I wish all innkeepers were fantastic, but it is not true - Mort told us about the burnt toast no heat no care Innkeepers.
Not all of us are older innkeepers - agreed, not all of us can or should follow every trend as suggested by Jay's article agreed. I believe that this author in his location is probably very competitive with other inns who are Joneses, they get a new website with flash - the rest get a new website with flash, they get a video - the rest get a video. We discuss these here all the time. Jacuzzi tubs - a major expense being one of those amenities we have discussed. It is not like we can just go out and put them in the rooms.
His book also makes sense to me -
The Innkeeper's Husband: Undercover With an Unconventional Innkeeper [/h1]
:
Product Description[/h3]"Everybody wants to be an innkeeper. Everybody wants to live in an idyllic and beautiful location and make pancakes and stuffed French toast for exotic guests who have interesting experiences to share. Everybody loves the fantasy of innkeeping. But the reality couldn’t be further from that dream. In The Innkeeper’s Husband, long-time innkeeper and writer Shawn Kerivan takes us on an unexpected ride filled with obnoxious guests, faulty plumbing, and financial uncertainty. The Innkeeper’s Husband is a funny and heartbreaking behind the scenes look at the intersection of dreams and reality.
The Innkeeper’s Husband chronicles the journey of a young couple who set out to marry their love of skiing with a low-stress way of life. Their solution? Buying an old inn and fixing it up. Shawn and his wife, Chantal, soon discovered that in the spectrum of small businesses, innkeeping ranks as one of the most challenging to survive. They soon find themselves dealing with everything from the brink of financial ruin to peeling paint—and that’s before a state inspector discovers that their 170-year old building isn’t “up to code.”
After reading The Innkeeper’s Husband, you’ll never think about traveling the way you used to."
Link here
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No I still think although there are bits of sense in there, it still sounds like sour grapes.
Not all inns keep up with the Jonses. I do what is wanted and enjoyed here.
I do my own website. When I do have the money to have someone help me, I still will keep it simple, as that's what I think draws my guests.
And I supply an escape. There is nothing wrong with that. We don't always want "realism" when we vacation. I get folks who want to escape from the stress of work and everyday real life.
And there is nothing wrong or phoney about that.
RIki
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egoodell said:
No I still think although there are bits of sense in there, it still sounds like sour grapes.
Not all inns keep up with the Jonses. I do what is wanted and enjoyed here.
I do my own website. When I do have the money to have someone help me, I still will keep it simple, as that's what I think draws my guests.
And I supply an escape. There is nothing wrong with that. We don't always want "realism" when we vacation. I get folks who want to escape from the stress of work and everyday real life.
And there is nothing wrong or phoney about that.
RIki
See the problem with posting it on THIS forum is you all think he is talking to you. He is replying and giving his take on the article Jay wrote. He is not coming after anyone here and putting them down. He is disagreeing with the article and that is his prerogative. The right thing to do would be to let JAY address his comments. Looking at his bookings etc, is not on. You all are the first to tell everyone - we can all have our own opinions.
Maybe his tone was not appealing, but what he said in general made sense.
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Joey Bloggs said:
See the problem with posting it on THIS forum is you all think he is talking to you. He is replying and giving his take on the article Jay wrote. He is not coming after anyone here and putting them down. He is disagreeing with the article and that is his prerogative.
I agree that he is responding to Jay's article, and Jay is more than capable of taking care of himself. BUT this guy is talking to us, and guilty of making the same sweeping generalizations that he accuses Jay of, when he says "Innkeepers are nothing if not pretentious." That's pretty much a general putdown of all of us. He could have written a rebuttal of the article that didn't defame innkeepers and insult guests, but he choose to attack instead.
In particular, I like his last paragraph, but most innkeepers will be put off by the middle of the article and never get to the end. I follow his blog, which is sparsely posted, and I find this blurb from the book most telling: "The Innkeeper’s Husband chronicles the journey of a young couple who set out to marry their love of skiing with a low-stress way of life. Their solution? Buying an old inn and fixing it up. Shawn and his wife, Chantal, soon discovered that in the spectrum of small businesses, innkeeping ranks as one of the most challenging to survive." No wonder he's not happy with the way things are working out - yet another innkeeper who thought this was going to be low-stress with plenty of free time (and money!) for skiing.
 

JBloggs

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So if he said SOME or Plenty of innkeepers are pretentious it would be more accurate. I agree, not all innkeepers are pretentious, not by a long shot, many are down to earth, honest and forthcoming, but there are some who are pretentious and their entire identity and self worth is their inn:
pretentiousness - the quality of being pretentious (behaving or speaking in such a manner as to create a false appearance of great importance or worth)
I have heard the "We own an inn so we can live in a big house" and other puffed up statements about an innkeeper's inn. I have heard innkeepers who are very arrogant in their day to day operations of their inn. I think he was saying if you yourself use paper plates and then talk 'Crystal and fine dining" then it is not real and the guests will perceive this.
The problem this author has is painting with such a broad stroke. So in addressing the article by Jay he is insinuating everyone follows the joneses - which is what he is saying to Jay's article - be yourself, don't fall into that trap.
So in light of the title of this thread ITG - I actually find it very useful blog article. We need not build our self esteem on our businesses, this is not who we are, if it falls, then we are left with the real estate only. Good food for thought, as we can be consumed by our businesses.
Thanks for sharing it.
 

muirford

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So if he said SOME or Plenty of innkeepers are pretentious it would be more accurate. I agree, not all innkeepers are pretentious, not by a long shot, many are down to earth, honest and forthcoming, but there are some who are pretentious and their entire identity and self worth is their inn:
pretentiousness - the quality of being pretentious (behaving or speaking in such a manner as to create a false appearance of great importance or worth)
I have heard the "We own an inn so we can live in a big house" and other puffed up statements about an innkeeper's inn. I have heard innkeepers who are very arrogant in their day to day operations of their inn. I think he was saying if you yourself use paper plates and then talk 'Crystal and fine dining" then it is not real and the guests will perceive this.
The problem this author has is painting with such a broad stroke. So in addressing the article by Jay he is insinuating everyone follows the joneses - which is what he is saying to Jay's article - be yourself, don't fall into that trap.
So in light of the title of this thread ITG - I actually find it very useful blog article. We need not build our self esteem on our businesses, this is not who we are, if it falls, then we are left with the real estate only. Good food for thought, as we can be consumed by our businesses.
Thanks for sharing it..
Joey Bloggs said:
there are some who are pretentious and their entire identity and self worth is their inn.
Yes, we know some of the same people!

Most of us here do espouse the idea that each inn is a reflection of its owner. It may not be exactly what the owner wants (detached or shared baths, not enough soundproofing for TVs, whatever) but it is a reflection of what the business owner thinks works best for themselves and their guests - otherwise, why would you think you could run it successfully?
The post reiterates keeping up with the Joneses might not be the best thing - haven't we said that here in response to bandb.com and some of the marketing gurus who keep pushing for new technology and upgraded amenities? You have to know what your market will support. But we will have to continue to attract new customers, and from the generations that follow the baby boomers, if we want to stay in business. Just by sheer virtue of an aging baby boomer population, we will lose many of those customers.
I haven't read Jay's article yet, so I don't really know if it is as one-sided as the blog post would make it seem. If the blog author wanted to get our attention by writing a rebuttal that was to the extreme, it worked.
 

seashanty

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innkeeper to go ... do you see all the affiliate ads on the blog? now there is a link here to the blog and lots of us have gone to it ... mission accomplished by the author/owner. i'm not going to enter into the debate about the content, but this is also what the author hoped for.
you see this approach a lot ... go after a 'big name' ... this time in the b&b world ... by posting a controversial article or a critical article ... and if that big name responds on the blog itself or elsewhere referencing the blog ... more hits for the blog ... bingo.
the goal is not to market the inn. the goal is to get hits on the blog site, get interest and visitors to the blog, and generate revenue through the affiliate ads.
if i were j.k. i would not respond. just my opinion.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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innkeeper to go ... do you see all the affiliate ads on the blog? now there is a link here to the blog and lots of us have gone to it ... mission accomplished by the author/owner. i'm not going to enter into the debate about the content, but this is also what the author hoped for.
you see this approach a lot ... go after a 'big name' ... this time in the b&b world ... by posting a controversial article or a critical article ... and if that big name responds on the blog itself or elsewhere referencing the blog ... more hits for the blog ... bingo.
the goal is not to market the inn. the goal is to get hits on the blog site, get interest and visitors to the blog, and generate revenue through the affiliate ads.
if i were j.k. i would not respond. just my opinion..
seashanty said:
i'm not going to enter into the debate about the content, but this is also what the author hoped for.
Actually, you just did.
 
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