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JBloggs

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Just wondering, do you wear an apron (logo'd or not) as part of your innkeeper attire?
What do you wear, is it seasonal? Or the same thing year round. Do you have a "uniform" of sorts you wear while you work? While you clean? Pockets, slacks, jeans, etc
 
No apron for hubs, but I wear one when I cook. I think it makes me look like I know what I'm doing.
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Summer attire is generally jeans & a linen shirt or pedal pushers & a linen shirt or a skirt & linen shirt. Today it's linen pants and, you guessed it, a linen shirt.
Winter is jeans & a t-shirt with a sweater over.
 
I am a walking billboard (right size too) as I wear my logo apron just about everywhere around town and at the produce store when shopping for supplies. I hate carrying a purse and my apron has POCKETS!! It is a bib apron with my logo and contact info on the bib. I also wear a logo polo shirt and slacks (a bottom like mine requires a lot of coverage!), and sneakers as my "uniform". DH wears jeans and a logo shirt. This is our year-round.
 
No uniform, and I know we should be wearing something while out doing tours. Hubs is a Preppie but I'm not in love with polo shirts. I'll have to try and find something - maybe a hat with our logo on it
Riki
 
I wear a logo apron when i first get up until I've finished cleaning/fluffing rooms. I then change to comfortable pants and shirt. We are very laid back and not in a fancy area, so our clothes as well as our guests are nice, but very comfortable.
I also sell our logo aprons.
 
Uniform? hah! I will wear an apron when I work in the kitchen, but that is about it. I am not a fashonista by any means. I have been told on multiple occasions by the powers that be (PTB) that I look like too 'horsey' and not 'hospitable' enough. (Cowboy boots go with everything imo - they are classics)
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and that this is a bed and breakfast and not a barn.
Sorry but I'm not a girly-girl and go for function over fashion.
I'm a jeans and button down kinda girl....and no, I don't wear the hat indoors. It's a horsey thing
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We're very casual here...jeans all year, tshirt in summer and a tutleneck under a sweater in the winter. Hubby wears an apron for breakfast...the ladies get a real kick out of home. Many have threatened to make away with him, but they would have to fight me for him!
 
After the PAII conference in Anaheim, there was a discussion on "the other" forum about this topic. There were innkeepers on there complaining about how so many of "us" didn't dress up at our inns and were having hissy fits over it! Several even complained about how the innkeepers at the PAII conference didn't dress professional during the conference and shouldn't be wearing jeans, etc. even at the conference!
I can only figure these comments were from the big prissy inns where the innkeepers had gobs of staff and all they needed to do was to show up looking like they stepped out of a magazine. Get real! Most of us have lovely and wonderful down to earth type places where it's perfectly appropriate to dress accordingly.
 
After the PAII conference in Anaheim, there was a discussion on "the other" forum about this topic. There were innkeepers on there complaining about how so many of "us" didn't dress up at our inns and were having hissy fits over it! Several even complained about how the innkeepers at the PAII conference didn't dress professional during the conference and shouldn't be wearing jeans, etc. even at the conference!
I can only figure these comments were from the big prissy inns where the innkeepers had gobs of staff and all they needed to do was to show up looking like they stepped out of a magazine. Get real! Most of us have lovely and wonderful down to earth type places where it's perfectly appropriate to dress accordingly..
Breakfast Diva said:
After the PAII conference in Anaheim, there was a discussion on "the other" forum about this topic. There were innkeepers on there complaining about how so many of "us" didn't dress up at our inns and were having hissy fits over it! Several even complained about how the innkeepers at the PAII conference didn't dress professional during the conference and shouldn't be wearing jeans, etc. even at the conference!
Boy they better not come here and see us coming out of the vineyard after working there...they wouldn't even like me "dressed up". That means my fancy flip flops....
RIki
 
After the PAII conference in Anaheim, there was a discussion on "the other" forum about this topic. There were innkeepers on there complaining about how so many of "us" didn't dress up at our inns and were having hissy fits over it! Several even complained about how the innkeepers at the PAII conference didn't dress professional during the conference and shouldn't be wearing jeans, etc. even at the conference!
I can only figure these comments were from the big prissy inns where the innkeepers had gobs of staff and all they needed to do was to show up looking like they stepped out of a magazine. Get real! Most of us have lovely and wonderful down to earth type places where it's perfectly appropriate to dress accordingly..
Breakfast Diva said:
After the PAII conference in Anaheim, there was a discussion on "the other" forum about this topic. There were innkeepers on there complaining about how so many of "us" didn't dress up at our inns and were having hissy fits over it! Several even complained about how the innkeepers at the PAII conference didn't dress professional during the conference and shouldn't be wearing jeans, etc. even at the conference!
Boy they better not come here and see us coming out of the vineyard after working there...they wouldn't even like me "dressed up". That means my fancy flip flops....
RIki
.
egoodell said:
Breakfast Diva said:
After the PAII conference in Anaheim, there was a discussion on "the other" forum about this topic. There were innkeepers on there complaining about how so many of "us" didn't dress up at our inns and were having hissy fits over it! Several even complained about how the innkeepers at the PAII conference didn't dress professional during the conference and shouldn't be wearing jeans, etc. even at the conference!
Boy they better not come here and see us coming out of the vineyard after working there...they wouldn't even like me "dressed up". That means my fancy flip flops....
RIki
Those would be yer goin' ta town flip-flops.
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I'm so grateful to see this topic - I'd been wondering how to bring it up (nothing like sweating the small stuff, hm?).
As an aspiring, I've had this on my mind. I find my daily garb now is a compromise between looking nice and being practical...I sold all my "professional" attire in a garage sale a few years ago. It seems to me that look works when you sit at a desk, but not in many other situations. I've had a quiet fear that as an innkeeper, looks might suddenly become more important than functionality. It sounds as if what works (for you all, anyway) a casual loook that allows you to do the work and also makes your guests feel comfortable. I'm glad to hear that.
I actually sewed up a bunch of aprons in preparation. It's something I do use now at home, and was hoping I wouldn't come off too
 
We dress business casual. DW usually wears slacks and a nice weather-appropriate blouse. I wear kakis and a polo shirt. I'm attempting to get us tops with our logo imprinted.
Having been in the corporate world 30+ years taught us the importance of appearance. It makes no sense to spend thousands of dollars on fixing your place up and then spend hundreds on advertising only to make a poor first impression and burst the illusion of class when your guests arrive.
 
I'm so grateful to see this topic - I'd been wondering how to bring it up (nothing like sweating the small stuff, hm?).
As an aspiring, I've had this on my mind. I find my daily garb now is a compromise between looking nice and being practical...I sold all my "professional" attire in a garage sale a few years ago. It seems to me that look works when you sit at a desk, but not in many other situations. I've had a quiet fear that as an innkeeper, looks might suddenly become more important than functionality. It sounds as if what works (for you all, anyway) a casual loook that allows you to do the work and also makes your guests feel comfortable. I'm glad to hear that.
I actually sewed up a bunch of aprons in preparation. It's something I do use now at home, and was hoping I wouldn't come off too.
sgirouard said:
I'm so grateful to see this topic - I'd been wondering how to bring it up (nothing like sweating the small stuff, hm?).
As an aspiring, I've had this on my mind. I find my daily garb now is a compromise between looking nice and being practical...I sold all my "professional" attire in a garage sale a few years ago. It seems to me that look works when you sit at a desk, but not in many other situations. I've had a quiet fear that as an innkeeper, looks might suddenly become more important than functionality. It sounds as if what works (for you all, anyway) a casual loook that allows you to do the work and also makes your guests feel comfortable. I'm glad to hear that.
I actually sewed up a bunch of aprons in preparation. It's something I do use now at home, and was hoping I wouldn't come off too
I have found the type of establishment as well as general niche/market for guests + interaction levels of the innkeepers have a lot to do with this. The super dressy innkeepers have staff and waltz around the inn. Those who have their fists in dough and flour on their cheeks are friendlier, welcoming, more accomodating and overall show more hospitality to their guests. This is of course, just my opinion.
If you paid $350-500 a night you would expect dressy, makeup, accessories + on the innkeeper(s). You wouldn't find them gardening in a tshirt and shorts.
But on the same token, I have guests who spend the most important night of their life together right here - their wedding night. I can't be cavalier and dress down when they are expecting something a bit more elegant. So go with your gut! You will find soon enough what works for YOU and your guests. The majority - of course, you can't please all the people all the time.
 
I'm so grateful to see this topic - I'd been wondering how to bring it up (nothing like sweating the small stuff, hm?).
As an aspiring, I've had this on my mind. I find my daily garb now is a compromise between looking nice and being practical...I sold all my "professional" attire in a garage sale a few years ago. It seems to me that look works when you sit at a desk, but not in many other situations. I've had a quiet fear that as an innkeeper, looks might suddenly become more important than functionality. It sounds as if what works (for you all, anyway) a casual loook that allows you to do the work and also makes your guests feel comfortable. I'm glad to hear that.
I actually sewed up a bunch of aprons in preparation. It's something I do use now at home, and was hoping I wouldn't come off too.
sgirouard said:
I'm so grateful to see this topic - I'd been wondering how to bring it up (nothing like sweating the small stuff, hm?).
As an aspiring, I've had this on my mind. I find my daily garb now is a compromise between looking nice and being practical...I sold all my "professional" attire in a garage sale a few years ago. It seems to me that look works when you sit at a desk, but not in many other situations. I've had a quiet fear that as an innkeeper, looks might suddenly become more important than functionality. It sounds as if what works (for you all, anyway) a casual loook that allows you to do the work and also makes your guests feel comfortable. I'm glad to hear that.
I actually sewed up a bunch of aprons in preparation. It's something I do use now at home, and was hoping I wouldn't come off too
Keep in mind (especially if your place ends up getting a lot of walk-ins) that the first impression a stranger has of your place may determine if they stay or turn around and leave. Now I've met guests while I've been in the garden up to my elbows in dirt and they've had no problem with that. But some guests can be skittish if they think you don't look quite professional 'enough' and they may try to talk your price down or not take you seriously. Just to keep that in mind.
So, you might want to try to plan a 15 minute 'get ready' period in the afternoon where you just calm down, wash up and 'put on your face' (as my mother would say). OK, everyone else stop laughing!
 
This is all very helpful.
We take a very middle of the road, well reasoned approach to our apprearances based on our average room rate, our location, the fact that we do everything with no staff, are up to our elbows in flour, eggs, garden soil, mulch, reject pretention vigorously, etc.. all the time.
We've got "work" clothes for the dirty tasks when nobody is around and we have better "work" clothes for when folks are here.
Usually its khakis and an unimprinted polo or casual button shirt for me. The much better half is pretty similar. We're always well-groomed with regular shaving, haircuts, clean hands and nails, etc...
Funny to hear about the condescending gripes at some conference. That's one of the reasons none of you will ever bump into us at one.
 
Slacks with t shirt and apron most of time while fixing breakfast.
 
We wear the standard service uniform - black pants and white shirt or blouse. I have a variety of aprons that I use to spice it up a little.
 
I'm so grateful to see this topic - I'd been wondering how to bring it up (nothing like sweating the small stuff, hm?).
As an aspiring, I've had this on my mind. I find my daily garb now is a compromise between looking nice and being practical...I sold all my "professional" attire in a garage sale a few years ago. It seems to me that look works when you sit at a desk, but not in many other situations. I've had a quiet fear that as an innkeeper, looks might suddenly become more important than functionality. It sounds as if what works (for you all, anyway) a casual loook that allows you to do the work and also makes your guests feel comfortable. I'm glad to hear that.
I actually sewed up a bunch of aprons in preparation. It's something I do use now at home, and was hoping I wouldn't come off too.
sgirouard said:
I'm so grateful to see this topic - I'd been wondering how to bring it up (nothing like sweating the small stuff, hm?).
As an aspiring, I've had this on my mind. I find my daily garb now is a compromise between looking nice and being practical...I sold all my "professional" attire in a garage sale a few years ago. It seems to me that look works when you sit at a desk, but not in many other situations. I've had a quiet fear that as an innkeeper, looks might suddenly become more important than functionality. It sounds as if what works (for you all, anyway) a casual loook that allows you to do the work and also makes your guests feel comfortable. I'm glad to hear that.
I actually sewed up a bunch of aprons in preparation. It's something I do use now at home, and was hoping I wouldn't come off too
I have found the type of establishment as well as general niche/market for guests + interaction levels of the innkeepers have a lot to do with this. The super dressy innkeepers have staff and waltz around the inn. Those who have their fists in dough and flour on their cheeks are friendlier, welcoming, more accomodating and overall show more hospitality to their guests. This is of course, just my opinion.
If you paid $350-500 a night you would expect dressy, makeup, accessories + on the innkeeper(s). You wouldn't find them gardening in a tshirt and shorts.
But on the same token, I have guests who spend the most important night of their life together right here - their wedding night. I can't be cavalier and dress down when they are expecting something a bit more elegant. So go with your gut! You will find soon enough what works for YOU and your guests. The majority - of course, you can't please all the people all the time.
.
JunieBJones (JBJ) said:
you can't please all the people all the time.
Oh ain't that the truth! There ought to be a list of B&B truisms and that one at the top.
 
I'm so grateful to see this topic - I'd been wondering how to bring it up (nothing like sweating the small stuff, hm?).
As an aspiring, I've had this on my mind. I find my daily garb now is a compromise between looking nice and being practical...I sold all my "professional" attire in a garage sale a few years ago. It seems to me that look works when you sit at a desk, but not in many other situations. I've had a quiet fear that as an innkeeper, looks might suddenly become more important than functionality. It sounds as if what works (for you all, anyway) a casual loook that allows you to do the work and also makes your guests feel comfortable. I'm glad to hear that.
I actually sewed up a bunch of aprons in preparation. It's something I do use now at home, and was hoping I wouldn't come off too.
sgirouard said:
I'm so grateful to see this topic - I'd been wondering how to bring it up (nothing like sweating the small stuff, hm?).
As an aspiring, I've had this on my mind. I find my daily garb now is a compromise between looking nice and being practical...I sold all my "professional" attire in a garage sale a few years ago. It seems to me that look works when you sit at a desk, but not in many other situations. I've had a quiet fear that as an innkeeper, looks might suddenly become more important than functionality. It sounds as if what works (for you all, anyway) a casual loook that allows you to do the work and also makes your guests feel comfortable. I'm glad to hear that.
I actually sewed up a bunch of aprons in preparation. It's something I do use now at home, and was hoping I wouldn't come off too
I have found the type of establishment as well as general niche/market for guests + interaction levels of the innkeepers have a lot to do with this. The super dressy innkeepers have staff and waltz around the inn. Those who have their fists in dough and flour on their cheeks are friendlier, welcoming, more accomodating and overall show more hospitality to their guests. This is of course, just my opinion.
If you paid $350-500 a night you would expect dressy, makeup, accessories + on the innkeeper(s). You wouldn't find them gardening in a tshirt and shorts.
But on the same token, I have guests who spend the most important night of their life together right here - their wedding night. I can't be cavalier and dress down when they are expecting something a bit more elegant. So go with your gut! You will find soon enough what works for YOU and your guests. The majority - of course, you can't please all the people all the time.
.
I think DH is going to have a fit when I tell him he needs to start wearing the make-up and accessories...
tounge_smile.gif
(just kiddin', we don't charge that much...)
 
I wear an apron while I cook and serve and casual pants and a top for the rest of the time. Usually no jeans when I have guests, but definitely jeans when I don't. I have a variety of aprons but not one with my logo on it. I think that's a great idea.
 

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