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Keurig, or any other one-serving-at-a-time coffee maker

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Sanctuary

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Do any of you use one of those single serving coffee makers? I just bought a Keurig, at my mother's suggestion, and have to say that I just love it. No more trying to keep up with who like what kind of roast and strength of coffee. Living in Miami, I am used to very strong coffee - pretty much an espresso for my normal cup of coffee. Most people don’t drink the same coffee I do, but some do.
My new Keurig has taken all of the fuss out of coffee. I find that guests look forward to the morning cup of coffee by pondering what flavor/roast/strength they are going to try today. There are over 200 possibilities - and no, I don’t have all 200! With just one coffee maker, I can satisfy everyone’s taste. And the cleanup...just the coffee cups - no more carafe to wash or grounds to clean up after. Oh, and no more waste.
Sometimes, I forget to make the ice tea in time for dinner and find myself scrambling at the last minute to brew a carafe of tea for dinner. This Kuerig does that too - one 16oz. glass at a time. It also does hot chocolate and lattes. After dinner coffee with dessert is such a breeze now.
As much as I love this new machine, I’m wondering if any of you use one in your B&B? I just can’t believe I’ve been without this all this time.
 

wendydk

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The new Inn in our region uses it, and he says its great. I had coffee made from it and it was very tasty. In fact, I recently did a little investigation into costs for one.
What does each cup of coffee cost you to brew? Do you have it hooked directly up to a water source, or do you have to fill a reservoir?
 

bbinnsitters

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Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please.
 

Morticia

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I know a lot of innkeepers who swear by their single brew machines! We were just talking about this the other day. Lots of innkeeps no longer even brew coffee in the morning, just let guests serve themselves whatever flavor they want.
I'm still concerned about the cost. The pods are from $.40-$.70 per serving depending on where you buy them. For $.75 I can brew a whole pot of coffee for 6 guests. Maybe it's the sheer number of guests we have. I might be looking at upwards of $20 for breakfast coffee alone (figuring a 'short' full house and everyone having 2+ cups because you can't just 'top off' with the pods). That might work out to $600/month on a really busy month. Then there are all the midnight coffee drinkers. Some of my guests will go thru an entire pot of coffee on their own. (They generally ask for an IV coffee drip when they sit down.)
But I know Gomez loves being able to pick the coffee he wants whenever we stay someplace that has one.
 

wendydk

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Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please..
suellen222 said:
Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please.
Coffeecow.com says each serving is .44. I looked at my Folgers Gourmet Supreme, which says "up to 240 cups" (yeah, right). Purchased on sale for $7.78, that means each cup costs .32. Since I know we don't get 240 cups out of one of those, the cost per mug is probably comparable, especially when it's not on sale and $10.00.
Hmmm, something to think about, and a nice touch for the guests, since you can do tea as well.
 

Morticia

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Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please..
suellen222 said:
Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please.
Coffeecow.com says each serving is .44. I looked at my Folgers Gourmet Supreme, which says "up to 240 cups" (yeah, right). Purchased on sale for $7.78, that means each cup costs .32. Since I know we don't get 240 cups out of one of those, the cost per mug is probably comparable, especially when it's not on sale and $10.00.
Hmmm, something to think about, and a nice touch for the guests, since you can do tea as well.
.
'240 cups' is based on a 6 oz 'cup' and not on a 12 oz mug, which a lot of B&B's have.
 

Morticia

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Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please..
suellen222 said:
Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please.
Coffeecow.com says each serving is .44. I looked at my Folgers Gourmet Supreme, which says "up to 240 cups" (yeah, right). Purchased on sale for $7.78, that means each cup costs .32. Since I know we don't get 240 cups out of one of those, the cost per mug is probably comparable, especially when it's not on sale and $10.00.
Hmmm, something to think about, and a nice touch for the guests, since you can do tea as well.
.
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
 

Sanctuary

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There are different models of these brewers. Some have a direct water hook-up. I chose one that did not since I like to use distilled water for my coffee. It was $140 and came with 72 brew cups. I'm finding the brew cups for around 40 cents, but I'm working on a source for 32 cents each. I did the math on how much coffee I use to make a pot, and it was almost a wash for me. We use a lot of coffee beans per pot. I will use a half of a cup of grounds just for 3 or 4 cups. When it's just me, the brew cups are a bargain. Even if it costs a bit more, I am really liking the variety and the fact that there is no waste or real clean up to do. My hot tea drinkers are really digging this thing, too. It takes about 20 seconds to make a cup of anything.
 

Tony

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I've had my Keurig for nearly 2 years and I'm more than happy with it so far.
The big advantages of it is that it brews only enough for individuals who want it (no wasted pots) and there's virtually no clean up or maintenance involved. This machine does not replace a regular coffeemaker during busy times such as breakfast. Using it to make individual cups over and over again for many people is time consuming, requires a lot of effort, and not cost effective.
 

Penelope

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What's the difference between the Keurig and something like the Flavia?
 

EmptyNest

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THese types of brewers were very popular a few years ago. I believe this one is being marketed more than any others right now.
 

egoodell

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I love my Tassimo. I can make Steam milk coffee drinks. And I love being able to make one cup when someone wants coffee in the evening instead of making a pot which is more expensive.
Riki
 

Morticia

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I've had my Keurig for nearly 2 years and I'm more than happy with it so far.
The big advantages of it is that it brews only enough for individuals who want it (no wasted pots) and there's virtually no clean up or maintenance involved. This machine does not replace a regular coffeemaker during busy times such as breakfast. Using it to make individual cups over and over again for many people is time consuming, requires a lot of effort, and not cost effective..
TLE041 said:
I've had my Keurig for nearly 2 years and I'm more than happy with it so far.
The big advantages of it is that it brews only enough for individuals who want it (no wasted pots) and there's virtually no clean up or maintenance involved. This machine does not replace a regular coffeemaker during busy times such as breakfast. Using it to make individual cups over and over again for many people is time consuming, requires a lot of effort, and not cost effective.
How do you keep guests from using the coffee machine?
 

JBloggs

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Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please..
suellen222 said:
Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please.
Coffeecow.com says each serving is .44. I looked at my Folgers Gourmet Supreme, which says "up to 240 cups" (yeah, right). Purchased on sale for $7.78, that means each cup costs .32. Since I know we don't get 240 cups out of one of those, the cost per mug is probably comparable, especially when it's not on sale and $10.00.
Hmmm, something to think about, and a nice touch for the guests, since you can do tea as well.
.
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
.
Morticia said:
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
That coffee cup is supposed to be refillable though. Not just one little cups worth.
 

Morticia

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Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please..
suellen222 said:
Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please.
Coffeecow.com says each serving is .44. I looked at my Folgers Gourmet Supreme, which says "up to 240 cups" (yeah, right). Purchased on sale for $7.78, that means each cup costs .32. Since I know we don't get 240 cups out of one of those, the cost per mug is probably comparable, especially when it's not on sale and $10.00.
Hmmm, something to think about, and a nice touch for the guests, since you can do tea as well.
.
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
.
Morticia said:
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
That coffee cup is supposed to be refillable though. Not just one little cups worth.
.
Not sure what you meant, but yes, I would hope a cuppa at a restaurant would be refillable for no charge.
For me, it's that exact scenario happening with the single serve machine. 'Oh, my coffee is cold, can I dump it out and start over?' Versus what everyone does now in just topping off with more hot coffee from the carafe. Because most guests who want a warm up take 2 sips and they're done. I throw out a lot of coffee after doing warm ups. I think I would cringe if I saw that with the single serve packs.
Very rarely we get asked if we will brew up a pot of coffee at night. Or the guest asks us to show them how to use the Bunn machine. For those folks I can put out the air pot to hold the coffee hot for them. Of course they never drink it, but they need to make sure in case they DO want to drink it, it's there.
 

JBloggs

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Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please..
suellen222 said:
Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please.
Coffeecow.com says each serving is .44. I looked at my Folgers Gourmet Supreme, which says "up to 240 cups" (yeah, right). Purchased on sale for $7.78, that means each cup costs .32. Since I know we don't get 240 cups out of one of those, the cost per mug is probably comparable, especially when it's not on sale and $10.00.
Hmmm, something to think about, and a nice touch for the guests, since you can do tea as well.
.
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
.
Morticia said:
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
That coffee cup is supposed to be refillable though. Not just one little cups worth.
.
Not sure what you meant, but yes, I would hope a cuppa at a restaurant would be refillable for no charge.
For me, it's that exact scenario happening with the single serve machine. 'Oh, my coffee is cold, can I dump it out and start over?' Versus what everyone does now in just topping off with more hot coffee from the carafe. Because most guests who want a warm up take 2 sips and they're done. I throw out a lot of coffee after doing warm ups. I think I would cringe if I saw that with the single serve packs.
Very rarely we get asked if we will brew up a pot of coffee at night. Or the guest asks us to show them how to use the Bunn machine. For those folks I can put out the air pot to hold the coffee hot for them. Of course they never drink it, but they need to make sure in case they DO want to drink it, it's there.
.
Oh I was just saying the cost is not as low when the cups are refillable.
 

JBloggs

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Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please..
suellen222 said:
Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please.
Coffeecow.com says each serving is .44. I looked at my Folgers Gourmet Supreme, which says "up to 240 cups" (yeah, right). Purchased on sale for $7.78, that means each cup costs .32. Since I know we don't get 240 cups out of one of those, the cost per mug is probably comparable, especially when it's not on sale and $10.00.
Hmmm, something to think about, and a nice touch for the guests, since you can do tea as well.
.
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
.
Morticia said:
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
That coffee cup is supposed to be refillable though. Not just one little cups worth.
.
Not sure what you meant, but yes, I would hope a cuppa at a restaurant would be refillable for no charge.
For me, it's that exact scenario happening with the single serve machine. 'Oh, my coffee is cold, can I dump it out and start over?' Versus what everyone does now in just topping off with more hot coffee from the carafe. Because most guests who want a warm up take 2 sips and they're done. I throw out a lot of coffee after doing warm ups. I think I would cringe if I saw that with the single serve packs.
Very rarely we get asked if we will brew up a pot of coffee at night. Or the guest asks us to show them how to use the Bunn machine. For those folks I can put out the air pot to hold the coffee hot for them. Of course they never drink it, but they need to make sure in case they DO want to drink it, it's there.
.
Morticia said:
Not sure what you meant, but yes, I would hope a cuppa at a restaurant would be refillable for no charge.
For me, it's that exact scenario happening with the single serve machine. 'Oh, my coffee is cold, can I dump it out and start over?' Versus what everyone does now in just topping off with more hot coffee from the carafe. Because most guests who want a warm up take 2 sips and they're done. I throw out a lot of coffee after doing warm ups. I think I would cringe if I saw that with the single serve packs.
Very rarely we get asked if we will brew up a pot of coffee at night. Or the guest asks us to show them how to use the Bunn machine. For those folks I can put out the air pot to hold the coffee hot for them. Of course they never drink it, but they need to make sure in case they DO want to drink it, it's there.
If the creamer is real cold the coffee goes cold very fast, if the coffee is not super hot and if the mugs are big the coffee goes cold quick. There are some variables as to why they want a fresh cup. So for those - the single serve machine would be used quite a bit wouldn't it? I can only see the single serve being an "after hours" thing, otherwise, a fresh pot of coffee is in order, imo. I know plenty of people who wouldn't fuss with a single cup machine for 5 cups of coffee. (I have some here right now, the pot was emptied before 8am and I made another)
 

Morticia

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Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please..
suellen222 said:
Most of the places I work for have one it seems! They are very popular, but I too was wondering about the cost comparison. If someone has figured it out let us all know please.
Coffeecow.com says each serving is .44. I looked at my Folgers Gourmet Supreme, which says "up to 240 cups" (yeah, right). Purchased on sale for $7.78, that means each cup costs .32. Since I know we don't get 240 cups out of one of those, the cost per mug is probably comparable, especially when it's not on sale and $10.00.
Hmmm, something to think about, and a nice touch for the guests, since you can do tea as well.
.
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
.
Morticia said:
I just found this by querying 'coffee cost per serving:'
Consider the following - restaurants usually sell a cup of coffee for about one dollar. And when they pay $6.00 per pound for coffee, their cost per cup is about ten cents, (which means their profit is ninety cents). So the difference in their profit between $6.00 per pound and $3.00 per pound is the incredible sum of five cents per cup.
The purpose of this particular comparison was 'taste' and not really cost.
That coffee cup is supposed to be refillable though. Not just one little cups worth.
.
Not sure what you meant, but yes, I would hope a cuppa at a restaurant would be refillable for no charge.
For me, it's that exact scenario happening with the single serve machine. 'Oh, my coffee is cold, can I dump it out and start over?' Versus what everyone does now in just topping off with more hot coffee from the carafe. Because most guests who want a warm up take 2 sips and they're done. I throw out a lot of coffee after doing warm ups. I think I would cringe if I saw that with the single serve packs.
Very rarely we get asked if we will brew up a pot of coffee at night. Or the guest asks us to show them how to use the Bunn machine. For those folks I can put out the air pot to hold the coffee hot for them. Of course they never drink it, but they need to make sure in case they DO want to drink it, it's there.
.
Morticia said:
Not sure what you meant, but yes, I would hope a cuppa at a restaurant would be refillable for no charge.
For me, it's that exact scenario happening with the single serve machine. 'Oh, my coffee is cold, can I dump it out and start over?' Versus what everyone does now in just topping off with more hot coffee from the carafe. Because most guests who want a warm up take 2 sips and they're done. I throw out a lot of coffee after doing warm ups. I think I would cringe if I saw that with the single serve packs.
Very rarely we get asked if we will brew up a pot of coffee at night. Or the guest asks us to show them how to use the Bunn machine. For those folks I can put out the air pot to hold the coffee hot for them. Of course they never drink it, but they need to make sure in case they DO want to drink it, it's there.
If the creamer is real cold the coffee goes cold very fast, if the coffee is not super hot and if the mugs are big the coffee goes cold quick. There are some variables as to why they want a fresh cup. So for those - the single serve machine would be used quite a bit wouldn't it? I can only see the single serve being an "after hours" thing, otherwise, a fresh pot of coffee is in order, imo. I know plenty of people who wouldn't fuss with a single cup machine for 5 cups of coffee. (I have some here right now, the pot was emptied before 8am and I made another)
.
Mini moos right now and they aren't refrigerated. Yes, big mugs, 12 ozs, so they do cool off. The coffee is hot when it's poured but I can see where on a cold morning those mugs are cold to start. They've been sitting in the unheated kitchen overnight!
We had the discussion this morning about how to 'remove' the single serve machine in the morning. Put a tea cozy over it?
You may remember this dilemma from a couple of years ago when we redid the kitchen...We started putting the coffee out in the airpots and no one would drink it. It was 'old.' They would all stand around waiting for the 'new' pot to brew. Even if they saw me pour the coffee into the airpot they didn't want it.
I think the same would happen with the single serve. Everyone would want a 'fresh' cuppa with the flavor of their choosing. Not some stale, old coffee from a carafe!
Altho, Gomez says he would only buy 'regular' and 'decaf' not flavors. In that case, what's the sense?
 

Dee C.

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My guests love it. I have it in the hall ouside my 4 rooms so my guests can access it whenever they wish. I still make coffee for breakfast. It's great because of all the flavors of coffee, tea, and hot chocolate, both regular and decaf.
 

gillumhouse

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I buy green coffee beans and the average cost for a pound of green beans is $6. One roast is 5 oz of beans which yields 4 oz of beans roasted and is enough for 2 12-cup pots of coffee.
 
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