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JunieBJones (JBJ)

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I just found out about a local cannery a half hour away. Have any of you ever used the services of a cannery? They can as in real tin cans you open with a can opener. Apparently folks are canning homemade chicken noodle soup, stews, etc there.
If you have used a cannery, what did you can? It is not open until the spring, but I would like to try it this year. I can make up huge batches of just about anything and would like to do this.
(I am not asking about home canning, but cannery canning)
 

gillumhouse

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What an idea!! Gifts in your gifts shop that are made by you and since canned in a cannery - should be legal to sell. That is the kind of gift I love to give - one that will not take up space in already over-cluttered homes. And it will truly be a local item gift (cans are stackable so they should not take up a lot of storage space for you either).
Something else to look for here!!! Thanks for the idea.
 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

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The best part is if they don't sell we eat them...ha ha
Ideas for what you would can?
Since the cannery is closed for the season as of Dec (missed it by that much) I have no idea of the costs, but this would not be an expensive endeavor, it is for the local folks here who grow their own food.
We have a pick your own strawberry farm that grows colonial strawberries - smaller sweeter berries that don't last as long as commercially grown, I had thought about those, as I pick them and have to use them up (altho I do freeze some).
 

gillumhouse

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The best part is if they don't sell we eat them...ha ha
Ideas for what you would can?
Since the cannery is closed for the season as of Dec (missed it by that much) I have no idea of the costs, but this would not be an expensive endeavor, it is for the local folks here who grow their own food.
We have a pick your own strawberry farm that grows colonial strawberries - smaller sweeter berries that don't last as long as commercially grown, I had thought about those, as I pick them and have to use them up (altho I do freeze some)..
Think beyond foods also.
Fruit syrups for ice cream or pancakes, fruit filling for pies, soup, chunky applesauce.... whatever is plentiful in your area that YOU can make.
How about your logo T-shirt in a can? put air bubbles or something to cushion and your mug-in-a-can? Do you have walnut trees? Can the nuts. If you can can it - think about it! Honey? Would cookies hold up? Fudge-in-a-can? Peanut Brittle? Cocoa mix? Coffee?
 

Penelope

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Do you do any special, "JBJ's Special Sauce" that you use exclusively at the inn? Can it. What about jams, jelies, pie fillings, cookie fillings...the ideas could be endless
 

EmptyNest

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Gosh I didn't know any of those were even around any more. Maybe with hard times ahead this will become more popular. It is a great idea. Let us know what you find out. I just did a search...here's a site to look at
Note that only 2 have passed inspection from the state of VA..so do consider this carefully because if you go to all the trouble of growing or making things you want to be sure it is safe....and...you cannot sell some items...if not passed and inspected by the state.
Is this one near you?
 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

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Gosh I didn't know any of those were even around any more. Maybe with hard times ahead this will become more popular. It is a great idea. Let us know what you find out. I just did a search...here's a site to look at
Note that only 2 have passed inspection from the state of VA..so do consider this carefully because if you go to all the trouble of growing or making things you want to be sure it is safe....and...you cannot sell some items...if not passed and inspected by the state.
Is this one near you?.
catlady said:
Gosh I didn't know any of those were even around any more. Maybe with hard times ahead this will become more popular. It is a great idea. Let us know what you find out. I just did a search...here's a site to look at
Note that only 2 have passed inspection from the state of VA..so do consider this carefully because if you go to all the trouble of growing or making things you want to be sure it is safe....and...you cannot sell some items...if not passed and inspected by the state.
Is this one near you?
That is so funny. The person mentioned in Callaway and also Glade Hill is the producer and camera man at our local tv station and also the Director of maintenance at the county school system.
We own land in Callaway - I better find out where that cannery is located, and the other is 30 minutes- the one I mentioned. (neither avail for commercial canning).
I have so much to say on poverty in these hills. People do not rely on the gvmt here, they grow their own everything. Ever hear me mention covered dish luncheons where there are 24 varieties of green beans?
I had a lady over the other night to showcase her beets. I told her in Australia beetroot is commonly found on burgers, as well as fried egg and bacon rashers. She grows and cans these beets -using a typical pickling mixture and they are out of this world. So I invited her over - she brought the beets and I made the Oz burgers. She gives them to me as gifts since I love them so much!
The book I am currently reading starts out with the great influenza in this county. People were hold up for three seasons without every seeing another person - all of them had stockpiled their own supplies (canning, venison, grains). Where the Great Depression just like the current recession effected so many people - people who start out with nothing had nothing to lose. They are self sufficient people.
Here is the blog article on this bestselling book that is causing a big stink right now. Places all around this B&B and community are detailed in this book as well as names being named.
All that to say canning never left fashion around here. That is a good thing and a bad thing.
 

EmptyNest

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Gosh I didn't know any of those were even around any more. Maybe with hard times ahead this will become more popular. It is a great idea. Let us know what you find out. I just did a search...here's a site to look at
Note that only 2 have passed inspection from the state of VA..so do consider this carefully because if you go to all the trouble of growing or making things you want to be sure it is safe....and...you cannot sell some items...if not passed and inspected by the state.
Is this one near you?.
catlady said:
Gosh I didn't know any of those were even around any more. Maybe with hard times ahead this will become more popular. It is a great idea. Let us know what you find out. I just did a search...here's a site to look at
Note that only 2 have passed inspection from the state of VA..so do consider this carefully because if you go to all the trouble of growing or making things you want to be sure it is safe....and...you cannot sell some items...if not passed and inspected by the state.
Is this one near you?
That is so funny. The person mentioned in Callaway and also Glade Hill is the producer and camera man at our local tv station and also the Director of maintenance at the county school system.
We own land in Callaway - I better find out where that cannery is located, and the other is 30 minutes- the one I mentioned. (neither avail for commercial canning).
I have so much to say on poverty in these hills. People do not rely on the gvmt here, they grow their own everything. Ever hear me mention covered dish luncheons where there are 24 varieties of green beans?
I had a lady over the other night to showcase her beets. I told her in Australia beetroot is commonly found on burgers, as well as fried egg and bacon rashers. She grows and cans these beets -using a typical pickling mixture and they are out of this world. So I invited her over - she brought the beets and I made the Oz burgers. She gives them to me as gifts since I love them so much!
The book I am currently reading starts out with the great influenza in this county. People were hold up for three seasons without every seeing another person - all of them had stockpiled their own supplies (canning, venison, grains). Where the Great Depression just like the current recession effected so many people - people who start out with nothing had nothing to lose. They are self sufficient people.
Here is the blog article on this bestselling book that is causing a big stink right now. Places all around this B&B and community are detailed in this book as well as names being named.
All that to say canning never left fashion around here. That is a good thing and a bad thing.
.
Great job on the blog! I haven't looked in ahwile...you have a ton of stuff...
I have made a new friend recently who bought an old pig farm and has been doing alot of gardening and home food preservation. She has invited me to grow some things at her place if I want to. We shall see. I don't know that this old back is up to doing all it takes any more :-(
 

gillumhouse

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Gosh I didn't know any of those were even around any more. Maybe with hard times ahead this will become more popular. It is a great idea. Let us know what you find out. I just did a search...here's a site to look at
Note that only 2 have passed inspection from the state of VA..so do consider this carefully because if you go to all the trouble of growing or making things you want to be sure it is safe....and...you cannot sell some items...if not passed and inspected by the state.
Is this one near you?.
catlady said:
Gosh I didn't know any of those were even around any more. Maybe with hard times ahead this will become more popular. It is a great idea. Let us know what you find out. I just did a search...here's a site to look at
Note that only 2 have passed inspection from the state of VA..so do consider this carefully because if you go to all the trouble of growing or making things you want to be sure it is safe....and...you cannot sell some items...if not passed and inspected by the state.
Is this one near you?
That is so funny. The person mentioned in Callaway and also Glade Hill is the producer and camera man at our local tv station and also the Director of maintenance at the county school system.
We own land in Callaway - I better find out where that cannery is located, and the other is 30 minutes- the one I mentioned. (neither avail for commercial canning).
I have so much to say on poverty in these hills. People do not rely on the gvmt here, they grow their own everything. Ever hear me mention covered dish luncheons where there are 24 varieties of green beans?
I had a lady over the other night to showcase her beets. I told her in Australia beetroot is commonly found on burgers, as well as fried egg and bacon rashers. She grows and cans these beets -using a typical pickling mixture and they are out of this world. So I invited her over - she brought the beets and I made the Oz burgers. She gives them to me as gifts since I love them so much!
The book I am currently reading starts out with the great influenza in this county. People were hold up for three seasons without every seeing another person - all of them had stockpiled their own supplies (canning, venison, grains). Where the Great Depression just like the current recession effected so many people - people who start out with nothing had nothing to lose. They are self sufficient people.
Here is the blog article on this bestselling book that is causing a big stink right now. Places all around this B&B and community are detailed in this book as well as names being named.
All that to say canning never left fashion around here. That is a good thing and a bad thing.
.
Many in the countryside of WV never knew there was a Depression. As in most places, it was the cities and towns that suffered. My grandparents (and Daddy) were almost not affected - they had gardens, canned, chickens, cows, feed sacks for material for clothes..... They had to buy sugar, flour (some had grist mills but not Pappy & Granny), coffee and very little else. Coal of course for heating. They also had apples, peaches, grapes, berries, rhubarb..... They sold butter, eggs, and milk (the FDA was not on them at that time). My earliest memories on the farm are helping to can. We lived as well as we did with all the 2-legged animals because we did U-pick and I canned everything I could get my hands on - including a lovely Coho salmon a friend gave me! I live in town now, but everyone here has a garden and I am already thinking of where I am going to be putting one for us in the Spring. My guests do not use our yard anyway. Maybe I can turn that into a draw - come see how you can feed yourselves even though you live in town.
Edited to say my Chicago Mom KNEW the Depression up close and personal.
 
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