Quantcast

Location, location, location... what is realy important about location?

INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources

Help Support INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources:

SeeBen21

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 16, 2009
Messages
86
Reaction score
0
I always here LOCATION is important, and I understand it in general. But what is LOCATION in detail. How to choose the right location?
Is it important to be in a “Destination/Vacation Area”?
Or is it Important to be near (up to 2 hours) of a big City like Boston?
I guess it’s up to your B&B and how your marketing strategy is.
What do you think! All input are welcome.
 

YellowSocks

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
2,179
Reaction score
13
Whatever the reason that people are coming to a given area, you want to be as close as possible to it. So, if they come to your town for the beach, you want to be ON the beach, or at least in view of it. If they come to your town for the opera or jazz, you want to be within walking distance, or possibly a short cab ride. If they plan to go out for a drink, they want to be able to walk home.
In my case, many people come to visit our university, seminary, and local businesses. The first house I fell in love with was way out of town on a little back road. No one would ever have stayed there! Well, they might have come for a romantic getaway, if I'd packaged and marketed it right, but with two little kids we knew that wasn't our market. We found this one in town, on the same street as the university. We get calls, "are you walking distance to the seminary?" and "how far are you from the university?" The fact that the seminary is less than a five minute walk has garnered us a LOT of reservations. The B&B "south of town" (only 2 miles from the seminary!) has a harder time booking those calls... they fill up, too, but we're the first choice as people can get a ride from the airport and don't have to rent a car. (OTOH, they get the romantic getaway crowd...)
The only lodging places IN our town are two B&B's plus a small hotel that is in decline. The chain hotels are all out by the interstate. If being close to the reception/seminar/funeral/reunion/wedding/business meeting matters to a guest (and it does!) then we are near the top of the list before they ever look at our website or investigate their options.
=)
Kk.
 

egoodell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
3,023
Reaction score
0
SeeBen21 said:
I always here LOCATION is important, and I understand it in general. But what is LOCATION in detail. How to choose the right location?
Location is important to me because I don't have the money to pay for large advertising. It was important to me to be where the tourists are going TO. They will not travel somewhere that has nothing but a B&B. You need something to entertain them - shopping, beach, historic, something or they will not come to your inn.
Location is important because once you are busy you need your time for your life. If there is nothing to do where you are located, you will have to create something for your people to do and that can become tiring.
Location is important as the first thing people ask when they arrive is "what is there to do here?"
Right now with the recession traveling people are looking for getting the MOST vacation for their money. If they don't see things to do where you are located, they will NOT COME.
Example here in Charlottesville, Virginia - the inns that are having problems are inns that are more than 15 minutes drive away from town. Here in town there is a lot to do.
Imagine you are an inn that is more than 30 minutes drive from Munich. How many guests do they book than those who are in Munich or a short tram or train ride away?
The best thing to do is to go to the website of the inn you are considering. Check the reservations availability calendar. Then check the calendar of those who are in locations closer to the town, beach or other amusements in the area you are looking.
Remember, also, that in some New England areas they are only open during the "season" and you may need to do something else to generate income during the "off season".
Be very careful when you purchase your inn. I would recommend bringing a video camera and taking video of everything in every room. Have them write in detail all that will come with the inn. Some have bought and found all rugs removed, and antiques replaced with cheap furniture (it said "bed" not the "antique brass bed" on the list), some have found even the light bulbs removed!! Some have found that the inn had sold many gift certificates and had no record of them - that would be income that you will lose -make sure those are noted on your side in the purchase price.
This is not to say that everyone selling an inn is not honest, but you need to be sure what you are receiving in your purchase!
RIki
 

JBloggs

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Oct 7, 2008
Messages
17,743
Reaction score
0
It all depends on what YOU are after. Are you looking for just a money investment with no personal interest in the community? Are you interested in tourists only or visitors to your BnB? We looked at 100% tourist destination BnB's and chose a non typical tourist destination and are thoroughly happy with that, in fact I tell guests if we had known, we would have moved here 20 years ago! Typical touristy areas mean people will be coming there and you need to market to snag them to YOUR INN vs the next inn of which there are many. Non touristy areas mean you need to make your area a destination and get the word out on how fantatic it is. So it is a totally different marketing.
In the overall scheme of things you want to make a good investment, if this is not just a life style choice, so for that, choose carefully. We looked at a tourist area and there were such an overabundance of BnB's there they were so competetive that they charged the lowest rates I have seen anywhere! It was ridiculous. I would not have knownwithout doing research on it. So that is key, do your homework and you might discover some huge differences in Place A vs Place B.
 

wendydk

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 7, 2009
Messages
1,656
Reaction score
0
We actually looked at existing small B&B's all over the state when we started out, but could not afford any of them (most of them did not show the income needed to support the payments). SO, we decided to go from scratch; we figured if we could not make a go of it, or picked the wrong location (or hated it), we could still afford to live in the house as a residence.
We started in our prime location (the nearby tourist mecca where we had both worked in the hospitality industry), and when we couldn't find exactly the house we wanted at the price we needed, we started searching in an outwards spiral until we found the one we wanted....half an hour away in a popular little resort village nestled amidst the lakes with a large ski resort....actually a better location with less competition than the tourist mecca.
My sisterinlaw and DH's best friend were vocally skeptical about the location, but we saw it as being in the middle of everything...halfway to everywhere popular in this part of the state. We get alot of extended stays and daytrips in all directions...so this seemingly rural location has been a boon to us. In fact, we've even had guests come specifically to visit the nearby tourist city and say that they enjoy staying a ways out of town and away from the traffic and bustle. The fact that the neighborhood black bear, fox, wild turkeys and bald eagles make appearances always tickled our city dwellers. We feel like we have the best of both worlds. A wonderfully popular small town 3.5 miles away that has everything guests need and more combined with proximity to other popular tourist areas to the North and the South....nearly everything within 30-40 minutes, and the BIG draws in the state both no more than 1.5 hours drive.
Simply put...are you looking only at existing Inns, or are you willing to do the hard work it takes to start from nothing? Figure that out first, then decide your budget and personal space needs, then pick the area you want to be in, whether it's your hometown or your favorite vacation destination and start looking. Keep in mind that when you are first starting out, your personal space needs may seem small, and you'll be more willing to sacrifice.....but take my word for it that as time goes on, you are going to want more and more privacy and especially STORAGE space (can you ever have enough?)
 

egoodell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
3,023
Reaction score
0
SeeBen21 said:
I always here LOCATION is important, and I understand it in general. But what is LOCATION in detail. How to choose the right location?
I
Another thing - we are just under two hours from Washington DC which is saving us right now in this recession. People are not traveling very far and trying to get the most for their money. We are busy because of the DC people - they are not in danger of losing their jobs, but many have lost a lot of their savings. They are coming to our Wine Country instead of flying to California or Europe.
We are lucky in that our area has some B&Bs but not such a large amount that we are tring to steal each other's guests. In Charlottesville proper and within 15 minutes drive there are less than 8 legal B&Bs I think.
Our location being wine country gives them enough of a change from the city (great restaurants, wine tasting, and histoical president's homes) that they do go home refreshed and feeling like they took a vacation.
We like the area because we are interested in wine and have planted a little vineyard. SO it is mostly important that you choose a location that you will enjoy.
We started our wine tasting tours first and then the B&B. We could not find anything we could afford so have built ourselves (husband has done framing and carpentry for years so has the experience). We have the main body built and one wing and hope to build the other wing this year.
If you start from scratch it is not as difficult as in the past. As soon as you open a website you are almost even with all the other B&Bs. Immediate bookings for us. Before websites it took years to get noticed.
RIki
 

EmptyNest

Well-known member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
8,741
Reaction score
1
Be very careful. Are you sure you want to relocate to the states?
We just had a couple from France come to our area to buy and run a B & B...they hated it!! They just did not fit in ...in the small town where the B & B was located. Even though I think they did a fairly good business thanks to the efforts of the previous owner..however, they just did not like it here and did not make any attempt to get to know any of us who perhaps could have helped them. We offered..but they never even contacted any of us.
So, after a year..fortunately they were able to sell and move back to France to be near their family.
Do you have family you will be leaving? Have you been to the States before? I am sure purchasing here and getting acclimated will be a big enough challenge in itself besides learning the B & B business.
GIve this lots of thought before you act!!!
 

SeeBen21

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 16, 2009
Messages
86
Reaction score
0
Be very careful. Are you sure you want to relocate to the states?
We just had a couple from France come to our area to buy and run a B & B...they hated it!! They just did not fit in ...in the small town where the B & B was located. Even though I think they did a fairly good business thanks to the efforts of the previous owner..however, they just did not like it here and did not make any attempt to get to know any of us who perhaps could have helped them. We offered..but they never even contacted any of us.
So, after a year..fortunately they were able to sell and move back to France to be near their family.
Do you have family you will be leaving? Have you been to the States before? I am sure purchasing here and getting acclimated will be a big enough challenge in itself besides learning the B & B business.
GIve this lots of thought before you act!!!.
You are right, for any big relocation you need to think carefully about it.
We did think carefully about it, in total over 3 years now. The states where always the perfect location for us. My DW did her Psychology bachelor in Edmonton and is currently working on her masters in a long-distance program at NCU. Even as she can speak German quite good it would be difficult to work in her profession here in Germany.
As I was traveling a lot in the States on vacation. I traveled the whole west coast from San Diego to Seattle as well as Florida and New England. it was always a wish to find a way to life and work over there. But it is difficult to obtain a visa. Of cores we will leave family behind but my Wife already left here behind as we life here in Germany and she is originally coming from Singapore.
We love that the people are much more open in the States than in Germany. Like you said if the French couple would had been more open it wouldn´t be so difficult und say would got help. But that’s what you didn’t get here in Germany, they see you as competitors and don’t want to share knowledge.
 

egoodell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
3,023
Reaction score
0
Be very careful. Are you sure you want to relocate to the states?
We just had a couple from France come to our area to buy and run a B & B...they hated it!! They just did not fit in ...in the small town where the B & B was located. Even though I think they did a fairly good business thanks to the efforts of the previous owner..however, they just did not like it here and did not make any attempt to get to know any of us who perhaps could have helped them. We offered..but they never even contacted any of us.
So, after a year..fortunately they were able to sell and move back to France to be near their family.
Do you have family you will be leaving? Have you been to the States before? I am sure purchasing here and getting acclimated will be a big enough challenge in itself besides learning the B & B business.
GIve this lots of thought before you act!!!.
catlady said:
Be very careful. Are you sure you want to relocate to the states?
I think this couple sounds international and adaptable. They have been here already and I think will fit right in. There are people who are "built" to travel and those who are happier in their own back yard.
Having grown up overseas as an "embassy brat", I often get homesick for the "old country" and could easily live back there. My husband - probably not!
And I don't think from the East Coast of the USA to Germany is any further than the East Coast to the West Coast.
I really think they are going to do just fine since they are doing their homework.
RIki
RIki
 

wendydk

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 7, 2009
Messages
1,656
Reaction score
0
Be very careful. Are you sure you want to relocate to the states?
We just had a couple from France come to our area to buy and run a B & B...they hated it!! They just did not fit in ...in the small town where the B & B was located. Even though I think they did a fairly good business thanks to the efforts of the previous owner..however, they just did not like it here and did not make any attempt to get to know any of us who perhaps could have helped them. We offered..but they never even contacted any of us.
So, after a year..fortunately they were able to sell and move back to France to be near their family.
Do you have family you will be leaving? Have you been to the States before? I am sure purchasing here and getting acclimated will be a big enough challenge in itself besides learning the B & B business.
GIve this lots of thought before you act!!!.
You are right, for any big relocation you need to think carefully about it.
We did think carefully about it, in total over 3 years now. The states where always the perfect location for us. My DW did her Psychology bachelor in Edmonton and is currently working on her masters in a long-distance program at NCU. Even as she can speak German quite good it would be difficult to work in her profession here in Germany.
As I was traveling a lot in the States on vacation. I traveled the whole west coast from San Diego to Seattle as well as Florida and New England. it was always a wish to find a way to life and work over there. But it is difficult to obtain a visa. Of cores we will leave family behind but my Wife already left here behind as we life here in Germany and she is originally coming from Singapore.
We love that the people are much more open in the States than in Germany. Like you said if the French couple would had been more open it wouldn´t be so difficult und say would got help. But that’s what you didn’t get here in Germany, they see you as competitors and don’t want to share knowledge.
.
Some places in the states are like that too. If you find an Inn or a town you like, be sure to investigate the other Inns and Innkeepers in town. Do they work well together? Are they friendly and helpful? Very important. When we started our little Inn, I couldn't get any of the other Innkeepers in the area to talk to me AT ALL, other than to offer to sell me their place.
It took a few years to warm them up...finally we were able to start a county B&B group with our own website and webervations consolidated availability and we have meetings (read: wine and pizza parties) a few times a year. Without that friendly relationship, it's a hard row to how, especially for a start-up!
Knowing firsthand how hard it is when you're starting out, I have made it my mission to help new Innkeepers whenever I can. I spent several days a couple of weeks ago getting our newest group member (scratch start up) starting with his website, webervations, and getting him on a couple of good directories.
It's better for all if everyone rows in the same direction!
 

SeeBen21

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 16, 2009
Messages
86
Reaction score
0
Be very careful. Are you sure you want to relocate to the states?
We just had a couple from France come to our area to buy and run a B & B...they hated it!! They just did not fit in ...in the small town where the B & B was located. Even though I think they did a fairly good business thanks to the efforts of the previous owner..however, they just did not like it here and did not make any attempt to get to know any of us who perhaps could have helped them. We offered..but they never even contacted any of us.
So, after a year..fortunately they were able to sell and move back to France to be near their family.
Do you have family you will be leaving? Have you been to the States before? I am sure purchasing here and getting acclimated will be a big enough challenge in itself besides learning the B & B business.
GIve this lots of thought before you act!!!.
catlady said:
Be very careful. Are you sure you want to relocate to the states?
I think this couple sounds international and adaptable. They have been here already and I think will fit right in. There are people who are "built" to travel and those who are happier in their own back yard.
Having grown up overseas as an "embassy brat", I often get homesick for the "old country" and could easily live back there. My husband - probably not!
And I don't think from the East Coast of the USA to Germany is any further than the East Coast to the West Coast.
I really think they are going to do just fine since they are doing their homework.
RIki
RIki
.
Rlik you are totally right!
actually we choose the location because it's just 1.3 houre from Bostan Int. APT and the flight to Germany are only 7hours not any longer than to the West coast. Sometimes you forget how big the States are.
And we have seasons in New England, which is the most importand for me but not so for my DW.
 

EmptyNest

Well-known member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
8,741
Reaction score
1
Be very careful. Are you sure you want to relocate to the states?
We just had a couple from France come to our area to buy and run a B & B...they hated it!! They just did not fit in ...in the small town where the B & B was located. Even though I think they did a fairly good business thanks to the efforts of the previous owner..however, they just did not like it here and did not make any attempt to get to know any of us who perhaps could have helped them. We offered..but they never even contacted any of us.
So, after a year..fortunately they were able to sell and move back to France to be near their family.
Do you have family you will be leaving? Have you been to the States before? I am sure purchasing here and getting acclimated will be a big enough challenge in itself besides learning the B & B business.
GIve this lots of thought before you act!!!.
You are right, for any big relocation you need to think carefully about it.
We did think carefully about it, in total over 3 years now. The states where always the perfect location for us. My DW did her Psychology bachelor in Edmonton and is currently working on her masters in a long-distance program at NCU. Even as she can speak German quite good it would be difficult to work in her profession here in Germany.
As I was traveling a lot in the States on vacation. I traveled the whole west coast from San Diego to Seattle as well as Florida and New England. it was always a wish to find a way to life and work over there. But it is difficult to obtain a visa. Of cores we will leave family behind but my Wife already left here behind as we life here in Germany and she is originally coming from Singapore.
We love that the people are much more open in the States than in Germany. Like you said if the French couple would had been more open it wouldn´t be so difficult und say would got help. But that’s what you didn’t get here in Germany, they see you as competitors and don’t want to share knowledge.
.
Some places in the states are like that too. If you find an Inn or a town you like, be sure to investigate the other Inns and Innkeepers in town. Do they work well together? Are they friendly and helpful? Very important. When we started our little Inn, I couldn't get any of the other Innkeepers in the area to talk to me AT ALL, other than to offer to sell me their place.
It took a few years to warm them up...finally we were able to start a county B&B group with our own website and webervations consolidated availability and we have meetings (read: wine and pizza parties) a few times a year. Without that friendly relationship, it's a hard row to how, especially for a start-up!
Knowing firsthand how hard it is when you're starting out, I have made it my mission to help new Innkeepers whenever I can. I spent several days a couple of weeks ago getting our newest group member (scratch start up) starting with his website, webervations, and getting him on a couple of good directories.
It's better for all if everyone rows in the same direction!
.
Oh so true. I am so glad you stuck with it and worked with the group. This is the same attitude I always had. In our location I knew there were plenty of guests for all of us and each of us is unique. So what may not appeal to one person will do another. Unfortunately this is NOT always the case with innkeepers and they just view each other as "the competition." Sad because as we know from this forum...there is so much we can share with one another and commiserate on together.
 

gillumhouse

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Supporting Member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
15,554
Reaction score
136
I am in a small city (here a city is population of more than 2000), halfway between 2 large cities (each less than 20,000 but BIG cities in my State), BUT I am a bit more than 6 miles off the Interstate highway.
I made myself a place to stay while visiting all the things I found for them to see and do (no one knew my city was a tourist destination until I told them it was). What i WILL caution about is this - all areas are not receptive to foreigners - and in my city, if your family has not been here for 3 or 4 generations, you ARE a foreigner! The fact I grew up in West Virginia helped a lot (my husband is a FOREIGNER because he is from Illinois) but i still had to "tread lightly" meaning not be pushy (very difficult since I am not a meek personality). Before you settle in an area, visit it a few times if possible. Get a feel for the area and the people. Go to a church service and see how you are welcomed - or not. That will tell volumes.
What will be good is that you will come into the area with "new eyes". It will all be new to you and you will see things that the "natives" do not because they have always been there. That will help with marketing as YOU find things of interest.
Best to you in your search. You did not say where you are from in Germany. Bavaria? City? Flatland or mountains?
 

egoodell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
3,023
Reaction score
0
Be very careful. Are you sure you want to relocate to the states?
We just had a couple from France come to our area to buy and run a B & B...they hated it!! They just did not fit in ...in the small town where the B & B was located. Even though I think they did a fairly good business thanks to the efforts of the previous owner..however, they just did not like it here and did not make any attempt to get to know any of us who perhaps could have helped them. We offered..but they never even contacted any of us.
So, after a year..fortunately they were able to sell and move back to France to be near their family.
Do you have family you will be leaving? Have you been to the States before? I am sure purchasing here and getting acclimated will be a big enough challenge in itself besides learning the B & B business.
GIve this lots of thought before you act!!!.
catlady said:
Be very careful. Are you sure you want to relocate to the states?
I think this couple sounds international and adaptable. They have been here already and I think will fit right in. There are people who are "built" to travel and those who are happier in their own back yard.
Having grown up overseas as an "embassy brat", I often get homesick for the "old country" and could easily live back there. My husband - probably not!
And I don't think from the East Coast of the USA to Germany is any further than the East Coast to the West Coast.
I really think they are going to do just fine since they are doing their homework.
RIki
RIki
.
Rlik you are totally right!
actually we choose the location because it's just 1.3 houre from Bostan Int. APT and the flight to Germany are only 7hours not any longer than to the West coast. Sometimes you forget how big the States are.
And we have seasons in New England, which is the most importand for me but not so for my DW.
.
SeeBen21 said:
Rlik you are totally right!
actually we choose the location because it's just 1.3 houre from Bostan Int. APT and the flight to Germany are only 7hours not any longer than to the West coast. Sometimes you forget how big the States are.
And we have seasons in New England, which is the most importand for me but not so for my DW.
So being that close to Boston will be great! Does the location have shopping/beach or other draws? I don't want to know where it is if you are working towards buying it. I was looking in New England as well as Charlottesville just because my father grew up there so it was an emotional desire. There were so many affordable inns there 8 years ago!
One thing we have learned - if you purchase a historical inn make sure you are able to do some of the work yourself as they require constant maintenance and leak like a sieve when you use air conditioning and heat. We built new and so have a good foundation to start.
They do now have very good individual room units that supply heat and air conditioning that we will use on our next 4 rooms. Also they now are able to service the hot water by demand water units here so we'll be using them as well. Cuts down on utility bills.
RIki
Riki
 

SeeBen21

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 16, 2009
Messages
86
Reaction score
0
I am in a small city (here a city is population of more than 2000), halfway between 2 large cities (each less than 20,000 but BIG cities in my State), BUT I am a bit more than 6 miles off the Interstate highway.
I made myself a place to stay while visiting all the things I found for them to see and do (no one knew my city was a tourist destination until I told them it was). What i WILL caution about is this - all areas are not receptive to foreigners - and in my city, if your family has not been here for 3 or 4 generations, you ARE a foreigner! The fact I grew up in West Virginia helped a lot (my husband is a FOREIGNER because he is from Illinois) but i still had to "tread lightly" meaning not be pushy (very difficult since I am not a meek personality). Before you settle in an area, visit it a few times if possible. Get a feel for the area and the people. Go to a church service and see how you are welcomed - or not. That will tell volumes.
What will be good is that you will come into the area with "new eyes". It will all be new to you and you will see things that the "natives" do not because they have always been there. That will help with marketing as YOU find things of interest.
Best to you in your search. You did not say where you are from in Germany. Bavaria? City? Flatland or mountains?.
Yes, it’s important to see how the locals welcome you. It can mean you will have a easy time or a really difficult time to get adjusted. I visited the area already twice and will go there for sure at least two more times. I want to see all seasons so I get a better impression and don´t regret it later as I only saw the summer and fall which are really beautiful up there.
Actually I’m living near Frankfurt just 20 min south in a smaller town but working in Frankfurt. It is really convenient to have a big Int. APT directly at your door step. I guess that’s why I look for a property nearer to a Metropolitan area as well as my DW will go mad to be in country side with no connection to a big city, as she grew up in Singapore.
 

egoodell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
3,023
Reaction score
0
I am in a small city (here a city is population of more than 2000), halfway between 2 large cities (each less than 20,000 but BIG cities in my State), BUT I am a bit more than 6 miles off the Interstate highway.
I made myself a place to stay while visiting all the things I found for them to see and do (no one knew my city was a tourist destination until I told them it was). What i WILL caution about is this - all areas are not receptive to foreigners - and in my city, if your family has not been here for 3 or 4 generations, you ARE a foreigner! The fact I grew up in West Virginia helped a lot (my husband is a FOREIGNER because he is from Illinois) but i still had to "tread lightly" meaning not be pushy (very difficult since I am not a meek personality). Before you settle in an area, visit it a few times if possible. Get a feel for the area and the people. Go to a church service and see how you are welcomed - or not. That will tell volumes.
What will be good is that you will come into the area with "new eyes". It will all be new to you and you will see things that the "natives" do not because they have always been there. That will help with marketing as YOU find things of interest.
Best to you in your search. You did not say where you are from in Germany. Bavaria? City? Flatland or mountains?.
Yes, it’s important to see how the locals welcome you. It can mean you will have a easy time or a really difficult time to get adjusted. I visited the area already twice and will go there for sure at least two more times. I want to see all seasons so I get a better impression and don´t regret it later as I only saw the summer and fall which are really beautiful up there.
Actually I’m living near Frankfurt just 20 min south in a smaller town but working in Frankfurt. It is really convenient to have a big Int. APT directly at your door step. I guess that’s why I look for a property nearer to a Metropolitan area as well as my DW will go mad to be in country side with no connection to a big city, as she grew up in Singapore.
.
SeeBen21 said:
Actually I’m living near Frankfurt just 20 min south in a smaller town but working in Frankfurt. It is really convenient to have a big Int. APT directly at your door step. I guess that’s why I look for a property nearer to a Metropolitan area as well as my DW will go mad to be in country side with no connection to a big city, as she grew up in Singapore.
Ah so you are a city boy! I lived for three years in Bad Godesburg - my father worked in the embassy in Bonn, then we were transferred for about 12 years to Bern Switzerland. You know, where they don't speak Hoch Deutsch, they speak Scrift Deutsch. They say there is no "hoch" Deutsch over them. After all, they told me, Switzerland is so old that the Swiss watched while God created the earth....I loved all the tall tales and fairy stories from both countries!!!
Riki
 

YellowSocks

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
2,179
Reaction score
13
I am in a small city (here a city is population of more than 2000), halfway between 2 large cities (each less than 20,000 but BIG cities in my State), BUT I am a bit more than 6 miles off the Interstate highway.
I made myself a place to stay while visiting all the things I found for them to see and do (no one knew my city was a tourist destination until I told them it was). What i WILL caution about is this - all areas are not receptive to foreigners - and in my city, if your family has not been here for 3 or 4 generations, you ARE a foreigner! The fact I grew up in West Virginia helped a lot (my husband is a FOREIGNER because he is from Illinois) but i still had to "tread lightly" meaning not be pushy (very difficult since I am not a meek personality). Before you settle in an area, visit it a few times if possible. Get a feel for the area and the people. Go to a church service and see how you are welcomed - or not. That will tell volumes.
What will be good is that you will come into the area with "new eyes". It will all be new to you and you will see things that the "natives" do not because they have always been there. That will help with marketing as YOU find things of interest.
Best to you in your search. You did not say where you are from in Germany. Bavaria? City? Flatland or mountains?.
gillumhouse said:
but i still had to "tread lightly" meaning not be pushy (very difficult since I am not a meek personality).
Rotflol! Imagine! You pushy!

:wink:
=)
Kk.
 
Top