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gillumhouse

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I keep my thermostat downstairs at 61 (upstairs are electric baseboards heaters in every room - on only when guests). This morning it felt so chilly that I decided to give myself an extra degree. The motor could be heard, but the room temp said 47. Moved the selector o OFF so I would not (I hope) burn up the motor. The furnace is about 25 years old.

I have a "straight gas" heater in the foyer - could not turn the valve to turn on the gas. Bill came up to try and he could not get it (he is older than I am!). I have a gas heater in the kitchen and the electric heater on in my office. Called the plumber to ask him to send someone over Monday morning. No guests so that is OK. Crossing fingers it is just a repair and not needing a new furnace. Will know tomorrow. The thermostat says it got to 54 in the studio today. Thank goodness the temps are in the 40s and not the teens with snow. Cross fingers for me.
 

Morticia

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Egads! My parents lost the heat for a week and my mom joked it got up to 50 if she sat right in front of the oven. There was no other place for them to go as the power was out all around them. They made an adventure out of it.
We lost our boiler during a busy fall week. By the time it was all done, including a new water heater, it was around $25k.
 

gillumhouse

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Egads! My parents lost the heat for a week and my mom joked it got up to 50 if she sat right in front of the oven. There was no other place for them to go as the power was out all around them. They made an adventure out of it.
We lost our boiler during a busy fall week. By the time it was all done, including a new water heater, it was around $25k.
IF it is a repair (I hope) it should be able to be fixed quickly. IF it is a new furnace, I hope to get away with 5K - I hope. At least it is not in the dead of winter when everyone and his brother is having furnace problems. Worst case, if it is any longer period, I can move into a guest room and plug the electric heater in my bathroom for the waterlines. Still have electricity. IF the weather ap is correct, it will be in the 40s tomorrow, dip to the 20s in the wee hours and snow Tuesday. Wednesday it is supposed to start back to the 40s. Going to have a lulu of an electric bill next month.

Update: Been and gone. He said it was a loose bolt that he replaced. I also had him "exercise" the valve on the radiator in the foyer so if it happens again (or the power goes out) I will have heat.
 
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alias annie

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good outcome and just a service charge! Way to go!

We replace our fuel oil furnace with a propane one in October... it's a space saver - goes on the wall of the cellar. The furnace needed to be replace several years ago, but just kept having it serviced and pampered it as long as we could. We also installed mini-splits for the guest rooms to get rid of the window AC units and replace oil filled electric space heaters for 2 of the guest rooms. Hoping our electric bill and propane bill will see a difference.
 

KenW

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Thats good news, we had a boiler system for heat and hot water, only took one day without both and a lodge full of PO'd guests to finally pull it out and go all electric.
 

gillumhouse

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good outcome and just a service charge! Way to go!

We replace our fuel oil furnace with a propane one in October... it's a space saver - goes on the wall of the cellar. The furnace needed to be replace several years ago, but just kept having it serviced and pampered it as long as we could. We also installed mini-splits for the guest rooms to get rid of the window AC units and replace oil filled electric space heaters for 2 of the guest rooms. Hoping our electric bill and propane bill will see a difference.
In 1912 gas was cheap. All the rooms except the kitchen and Mr. Gillum's Den had gas fireplaces. His den had a coal burning I am told and the kitchen had the stove that kept it warm. In 1952 I am told the Gillums invited the folks from the church to come see their new kitchen - the back porch. They moved their bedroom from upstairs into the dining room and the dining room moved into the kitchen. There is no ductwork upstairs so we opted for electric baseboard heaters with thermostats in each room up there. Added advantage is I only heat or cool the upstairs when there are guests. In coldest winter, I set the heat in the bathrooms to low and close those doors to keep the pipes from freezing. ALL upstairs fireplaces have had the asbestos encapsulated and then boarded up.

We replaced the forced air gas furnace Mr. Gillum installed in 1957 in 1995 I think (or 96), not because it wasn't functioning, but because it was not efficient. The nice thing about having both gas and electric is that if the power fails, even though the upstairs is in trouble, I have the radiator in the foyer that was a water-filled I am told (it is surmised the water boiled away long ago) but it DOES still function. The problem with it is there are no safety features on it - turn on the gas, light it, and it heats until you turn off the gas.

I breathed a sigh of relief when he said it is just a replaced bolt.
 
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