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Country Girl

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How do you politely refuse a guest that wants to return but that you don't want back? In the days before online reservations we could say we were already full but now they can go online and see for themselves that we are not.
 

JBloggs

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that's not an easy one. Grin and bear it comes to mind. They stay they pay they go away comes to mind also. otherwise I would be eating a bottle of tums right now to figure it out...
 

wendydk

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"Grin and bear it comes to mind."
I'm suprised to hear you say that, JB. I more often hear something like "don't let the guests get away with stuff, it's not fair to the next Innkeeper they stay with". (at least when it comes to checking in early or "getting away" with something else).
I guess it depends on WHY CG doesn't want them back. Were they offensive or irritating to other guests? Did they damage something or flaunt Inn policies?
A guest that wants to come back is a real asset, and not to be dumped lightly!
 

JBloggs

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"Grin and bear it comes to mind."
I'm suprised to hear you say that, JB. I more often hear something like "don't let the guests get away with stuff, it's not fair to the next Innkeeper they stay with". (at least when it comes to checking in early or "getting away" with something else).
I guess it depends on WHY CG doesn't want them back. Were they offensive or irritating to other guests? Did they damage something or flaunt Inn policies?
A guest that wants to come back is a real asset, and not to be dumped lightly!.
Little Blue said:
"Grin and bear it comes to mind."
I'm suprised to hear you say that, JB. I more often hear something like "don't let the guests get away with stuff, it's not fair to the next Innkeeper they stay with". (at least when it comes to checking in early or "getting away" with something else).
I guess it depends on WHY CG doesn't want them back. Were they offensive or irritating to other guests? Did they damage something or flaunt Inn policies?
A guest that wants to come back is a real asset, and not to be dumped lightly!
Since she never stated an overt reason, my thought was she just doesn't like them. So for that, there are guests we just don't like and therefore the grin and bear it. Why would I say "dont take it from guests" etc as she stated no reason, so I am thinking it is just a personal dislike situation. Which is why I say "Let them eat cake" and pay your bills. You should know me better by now LB.
We don't have to like them all. Some are just plain boring and bug you, no reason for not rebooking them when they obv love to stay with you.
 

Country Girl

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The reason I don't want this particular guest back is because she gets drunk every night, vomits, and disturbs the other guests by being overly loud. However, the next morning and during the day and she is very pleasant. When she is here alone I can put up with her but when we have other guests it's a problem. I don't want to hurt her feelings by telling her WHY she can't stay here anymore. I guess I am looking for an easy way out.
 

wendydk

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The reason I don't want this particular guest back is because she gets drunk every night, vomits, and disturbs the other guests by being overly loud. However, the next morning and during the day and she is very pleasant. When she is here alone I can put up with her but when we have other guests it's a problem. I don't want to hurt her feelings by telling her WHY she can't stay here anymore. I guess I am looking for an easy way out..
Wow, Country Girl, that is a tough one. I suppose there is no way to "upgrade" her to get her away from other guests?
If not, then I think you should tell her the truth. You enjoy her company, but her drinking and it's aftermath is a problem for other paying guests that puts you right in the middle.
 

muirford

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The reason I don't want this particular guest back is because she gets drunk every night, vomits, and disturbs the other guests by being overly loud. However, the next morning and during the day and she is very pleasant. When she is here alone I can put up with her but when we have other guests it's a problem. I don't want to hurt her feelings by telling her WHY she can't stay here anymore. I guess I am looking for an easy way out..
Disturbing other guests is a pretty legitimate reason to ask a guest to find other accommodations. It will not be a fun conversation but I would feel within my rights to say no to her reservation. I have at least one person on my 'do not book again' because the noise she made required me to move other guests around her - she returns every summer for our theater festival but she can't stay here.
 

Don Draper

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CG, this is ridiculous that you're being put in this position...this person should not be using your place as a dumping ground, literally. If you truly don't want her to come back you need to have the bold faced conversation with her and point out that her actions make it too difficult for you to have her in your home. Maybe it's the wakeup call she needs.
 

JBloggs

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The reason I don't want this particular guest back is because she gets drunk every night, vomits, and disturbs the other guests by being overly loud. However, the next morning and during the day and she is very pleasant. When she is here alone I can put up with her but when we have other guests it's a problem. I don't want to hurt her feelings by telling her WHY she can't stay here anymore. I guess I am looking for an easy way out..
Country Girl said:
The reason I don't want this particular guest back is because she gets drunk every night, vomits, and disturbs the other guests by being overly loud. However, the next morning and during the day and she is very pleasant. When she is here alone I can put up with her but when we have other guests it's a problem. I don't want to hurt her feelings by telling her WHY she can't stay here anymore. I guess I am looking for an easy way out.
Definite legit reason for refusal, in fact one of the very few that will hold up. You can do her a favor by letting her know the reason why. Not our job to be interventionist, but I think it would be bold and down the road a good thing.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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I have faced this situation once or twice myself. I will apologize and say we have certain rooms closed for repairs....we are experiencing some renovations....the rugs are being cleaned...that room is experiencing a plumbing problem...etc.
I find this to be the most graceful way
 

wendydk

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I have faced this situation once or twice myself. I will apologize and say we have certain rooms closed for repairs....we are experiencing some renovations....the rugs are being cleaned...that room is experiencing a plumbing problem...etc.
I find this to be the most graceful way.
And if she picks a different date in the future, or calls again a few months down the line?
 

Morticia

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Why do you not want the guest back? Policy breaking? They 'dont' fit'?
If it's policy-related I would tell them outright. 'Last time you were here you smoked in your room. We did not charge you for that but we also do not wish to deal with the cleanup again, either. Here are a couple of other places in the area that have smoking rooms.'
They don't fit? 'Last time you were here we noticed you did not seem to really be enjoying yourself. Perhaps you would like to try these places, which may be more to your liking.'
 

wendydk

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Why do you not want the guest back? Policy breaking? They 'dont' fit'?
If it's policy-related I would tell them outright. 'Last time you were here you smoked in your room. We did not charge you for that but we also do not wish to deal with the cleanup again, either. Here are a couple of other places in the area that have smoking rooms.'
They don't fit? 'Last time you were here we noticed you did not seem to really be enjoying yourself. Perhaps you would like to try these places, which may be more to your liking.'.
"she gets drunk every night, vomits, and disturbs the other guests by being overly loud"
 

Copperhead

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The reason I don't want this particular guest back is because she gets drunk every night, vomits, and disturbs the other guests by being overly loud. However, the next morning and during the day and she is very pleasant. When she is here alone I can put up with her but when we have other guests it's a problem. I don't want to hurt her feelings by telling her WHY she can't stay here anymore. I guess I am looking for an easy way out..
Country Girl said:
The reason I don't want this particular guest back is because she gets drunk every night, vomits, and disturbs the other guests by being overly loud. However, the next morning and during the day and she is very pleasant. When she is here alone I can put up with her but when we have other guests it's a problem. I don't want to hurt her feelings by telling her WHY she can't stay here anymore. I guess I am looking for an easy way out.
Sure wish there was an easy way out of this but if you really don't want to deal with her again, you will need to suck up and let her know.
I would start by stating that this is very uncomfortable for you to state but that she really does not fit in with your type of guests. Your place is designed and draws people for peach and quiet while she comes in late and disturbs others when doing so and several have complained in the past. Provide her with other possible accommodations that may suit her and wish her well.
Good luck.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Why do you not want the guest back? Policy breaking? They 'dont' fit'?
If it's policy-related I would tell them outright. 'Last time you were here you smoked in your room. We did not charge you for that but we also do not wish to deal with the cleanup again, either. Here are a couple of other places in the area that have smoking rooms.'
They don't fit? 'Last time you were here we noticed you did not seem to really be enjoying yourself. Perhaps you would like to try these places, which may be more to your liking.'.
"she gets drunk every night, vomits, and disturbs the other guests by being overly loud"
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Exactly, Little Blue. That's pretty much enough already, the first time.
But it's happened more than once so it's a no-brainer. It reflects badly on the inn - and innkeeper - to have drunken and disorderly guests. Just not what your treasured guests are really look for. Not exactly ambiance.
Disturbing the other guests - every single time it sounds like - is reason enough to blackball this guest.
Would I tell her myself, that she's not ever going to come back?
Probably not. Drunks are not generally the most rational of people; trying to talk sense to them, even in the daytime may not be the best plan. And chances are not good that she's going to even admit her behavior - if she remembers it.
But I'd keep her out all the same.
How? Just whenever she wants to come back - and however often she may try - I'd stick with the old standby: Sorry but we just don't have anything available. I'd stick with that until she finally moves on and gets in the habit of staying elsewhere. And she will.
Recommending another inn for her is the only really tricky issue here. Dumping a disruptive guest on another inn/innkeeper isn't exactly cool. If there's a place nearby with stand-alone cottages and no opportunity for her to create disruptive noise, that might work.
Disruptive guests are a no-win for everyone. Keep them out. Your guests deserve better than that - and so do you!
 

Morticia

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Why do you not want the guest back? Policy breaking? They 'dont' fit'?
If it's policy-related I would tell them outright. 'Last time you were here you smoked in your room. We did not charge you for that but we also do not wish to deal with the cleanup again, either. Here are a couple of other places in the area that have smoking rooms.'
They don't fit? 'Last time you were here we noticed you did not seem to really be enjoying yourself. Perhaps you would like to try these places, which may be more to your liking.'.
"she gets drunk every night, vomits, and disturbs the other guests by being overly loud"
.
Exactly, Little Blue. That's pretty much enough already, the first time.
But it's happened more than once so it's a no-brainer. It reflects badly on the inn - and innkeeper - to have drunken and disorderly guests. Just not what your treasured guests are really look for. Not exactly ambiance.
Disturbing the other guests - every single time it sounds like - is reason enough to blackball this guest.
Would I tell her myself, that she's not ever going to come back?
Probably not. Drunks are not generally the most rational of people; trying to talk sense to them, even in the daytime may not be the best plan. And chances are not good that she's going to even admit her behavior - if she remembers it.
But I'd keep her out all the same.
How? Just whenever she wants to come back - and however often she may try - I'd stick with the old standby: Sorry but we just don't have anything available. I'd stick with that until she finally moves on and gets in the habit of staying elsewhere. And she will.
Recommending another inn for her is the only really tricky issue here. Dumping a disruptive guest on another inn/innkeeper isn't exactly cool. If there's a place nearby with stand-alone cottages and no opportunity for her to create disruptive noise, that might work.
Disruptive guests are a no-win for everyone. Keep them out. Your guests deserve better than that - and so do you!
.
Definitely don't pass her on to another B&B. She may already know her days are numbered. We had a group last year that has stayed at every B&B in town. Last year was our turn. No one passed them on to us but everyone else was less than gracious with them so they got the hint.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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I have faced this situation once or twice myself. I will apologize and say we have certain rooms closed for repairs....we are experiencing some renovations....the rugs are being cleaned...that room is experiencing a plumbing problem...etc.
I find this to be the most graceful way.
And if she picks a different date in the future, or calls again a few months down the line?
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Little Blue said:
And if she picks a different date in the future, or calls again a few months down the line?
I would reiterate that there is no availability every time she calls. She'll get the hint eventually and simply give up.
 
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