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Perception

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JBloggs

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This actually pertains to what we talk about all the time on here...like using the word QUAINT to describe a room. ha ha
Perception


Washington, D.C.
Metro Station on a cold January morning in 2007.
The man with a violin played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time approx. 2 thousand people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.
After 3 minutes a middle aged man noticed there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried to meet his schedule.


4 minutes later:

The violinist received his first dollar: a woman threw the money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk.

6 minutes:

A young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again.


10 minutes:


A 3-year old boy stopped but his mother tugged him along hurriedly. The kid stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time.
This action was repeated by several other children. Every parent, without exception, forced their children to move on quickly.


45 minutes:


The musician played continuously. Only 6 people stopped and listened for a short while. About 20 gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace. The man collected a total of $32.


1 hour:


He finished playing and silence took over. No one noticed. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.


No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.
Two days before[FONT=&quot] , [/FONT]Joshua Bell sold out a theater in Boston where the seats averaged [FONT=&quot] $100. [/FONT]
This is a true story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people's priorities.
The questions raised: in a common place environment at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?

One conclusion reached from this experiment could be this: If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made.... How many other things are we missing?
 

oldcharm

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simply amazing and so true.
oh, to be a kid again. my nephews... 1 and 2... are so innocent. they love what they love, they don't judge, they haven't been tainted by the world.
thanks for sharing!!
 

happykeeper

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This isn't directed at anyone- I just was feeling a little sassy.
I read about this a while back and I think my reaction at the time was that the context was not used as a variable and the end result was so predictable that the author knew going into it, that people would not stop. At the time, I thought it was essentially a cheap trick that allowed the author to speak from a noble place about a completely expected result, so that they reinforce the sentiment that people don't care or pay attention and miss all kinds of good things. Cynicism sells papers. Nice stories don't.
The truth, IMHO, is much more wonderful than that!
At least one passerby:
was thinking about what they could do for their sick relative.
was talking to their spouse on the phone about who would pick their child up from school.
was humming the music as they moved through and thinking about how nice it was to have music like that at the subway.
was inspired to play classical music at home that night.
 

gillumhouse

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This isn't directed at anyone- I just was feeling a little sassy.
I read about this a while back and I think my reaction at the time was that the context was not used as a variable and the end result was so predictable that the author knew going into it, that people would not stop. At the time, I thought it was essentially a cheap trick that allowed the author to speak from a noble place about a completely expected result, so that they reinforce the sentiment that people don't care or pay attention and miss all kinds of good things. Cynicism sells papers. Nice stories don't.
The truth, IMHO, is much more wonderful than that!
At least one passerby:
was thinking about what they could do for their sick relative.
was talking to their spouse on the phone about who would pick their child up from school.
was humming the music as they moved through and thinking about how nice it was to have music like that at the subway.
was inspired to play classical music at home that night..
I do like your take on it and agree.
Many could have been cutting it close the get to work on time. (Some could have been in desparate need of a restroom - been there!)
Some could have been transported mentally to a most beautiful memory.
The do not care assumption is overlaying everyone in that subway station with the conclusions and suppositions of the author. It is like talking to someone and they try to finish your sentence for you but they do not know what you really were going to say.
 
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O.K.here we go......I was in D.C., Crystal City , Arlington & Old Town Alexander yesterday. Heard some great violin music and looked over where the music was coming from to give the person some money if there was a basket . A tin can and a recorder. He was playng recorded music and trying to get tips !........Have times changed that much ?? Mary in Bridgewater, Va.
 

JBloggs

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KnKBnB I agree. I almost didn't post it on here for that same "feeling." Train stations have buskers and panhandlers day in and day out. I don't think walking past was because they were cold and uncaring hurried people.
I think I posted it as sometimes we have mucho griping on the forum about guests just acting like normal people. So for that I wanted to somehow, post that what WE perceive as a rattling noise - aka a PITA might be otherwise. I know I know had an agenda...
Sometimes I do when I don't like reading negative posts or complaining.
 

happykeeper

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KnKBnB I agree. I almost didn't post it on here for that same "feeling." Train stations have buskers and panhandlers day in and day out. I don't think walking past was because they were cold and uncaring hurried people.
I think I posted it as sometimes we have mucho griping on the forum about guests just acting like normal people. So for that I wanted to somehow, post that what WE perceive as a rattling noise - aka a PITA might be otherwise. I know I know had an agenda...
Sometimes I do when I don't like reading negative posts or complaining..
Yeah, you have got to watch me. I think it's all good! Really!
 
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