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Suzie Q

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I was wondering if anyone had any ideas for soundproofing a room? Our kitchen (1/2 wall) is across the front room/parlor and 15' from the bedroom. Does anyone have any ideas for keeping sound down from the kitchen, so it doesn't reach the bedroom? (6 panel oak doors)
Thanks!
C
 

Tim_Toad_HLB

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We have a similar scenario with one room being located next to the kitchen.
Our walls are 14" thick solid brick with 2" of plaster on each side. Our noise issue comes from the door into the room leaking sound. I put extra rubber weatherstripping around the perimeter and a well-fitting wood baseplate on the floor so that the gap between the floor and the bottom of the door is well sealed with a rubber flapper thing on the inside of the door.
If you can't or don't want to rip out the wall, there are some spray in insulation foams that I've heard work really well. If you have access to the full wall, you would locate your studs first, then drill a little 1/2" hole halfway up the wall between each stud and then again up top near the ceiling.
The material comes in a can that looks like a 5 gallon propane tank and has a little nozzle that fits in the hole.
http://expandingfoaminsulationguide.com/expanding-foam-wall-insulation/
 

Proud Texan

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We have a similar scenario with one room being located next to the kitchen.
Our walls are 14" thick solid brick with 2" of plaster on each side. Our noise issue comes from the door into the room leaking sound. I put extra rubber weatherstripping around the perimeter and a well-fitting wood baseplate on the floor so that the gap between the floor and the bottom of the door is well sealed with a rubber flapper thing on the inside of the door.
If you can't or don't want to rip out the wall, there are some spray in insulation foams that I've heard work really well. If you have access to the full wall, you would locate your studs first, then drill a little 1/2" hole halfway up the wall between each stud and then again up top near the ceiling.
The material comes in a can that looks like a 5 gallon propane tank and has a little nozzle that fits in the hole.
http://expandingfoaminsulationguide.com/expanding-foam-wall-insulation/.
Tim_Toad_HLB said:
We have a similar scenario with one room being located next to the kitchen.
Our walls are 14" thick solid brick with 2" of plaster on each side. Our noise issue comes from the door into the room leaking sound. I put extra rubber weatherstripping around the perimeter and a well-fitting wood baseplate on the floor so that the gap between the floor and the bottom of the door is well sealed with a rubber flapper thing on the inside of the door.
If you can't or don't want to rip out the wall, there are some spray in insulation foams that I've heard work really well. If you have access to the full wall, you would locate your studs first, then drill a little 1/2" hole halfway up the wall between each stud and then again up top near the ceiling.
The material comes in a can that looks like a 5 gallon propane tank and has a little nozzle that fits in the hole.
http://expandingfoaminsulationguide.com/expanding-foam-wall-insulation/
Without experience, this is not a DIY job. I used to install this stuff professionally. The foam insulation expands rapidly and exerts a tremendous amount of hydraulic pressure that can very easily (and has) popped your wall material right off the studs and creates a wonderful mess that is not easy to remove. This does work provided you have empty wall cavities, but it's best left to the pros.
 

Tim_Toad_HLB

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We have a similar scenario with one room being located next to the kitchen.
Our walls are 14" thick solid brick with 2" of plaster on each side. Our noise issue comes from the door into the room leaking sound. I put extra rubber weatherstripping around the perimeter and a well-fitting wood baseplate on the floor so that the gap between the floor and the bottom of the door is well sealed with a rubber flapper thing on the inside of the door.
If you can't or don't want to rip out the wall, there are some spray in insulation foams that I've heard work really well. If you have access to the full wall, you would locate your studs first, then drill a little 1/2" hole halfway up the wall between each stud and then again up top near the ceiling.
The material comes in a can that looks like a 5 gallon propane tank and has a little nozzle that fits in the hole.
http://expandingfoaminsulationguide.com/expanding-foam-wall-insulation/.
Tim_Toad_HLB said:
We have a similar scenario with one room being located next to the kitchen.
Our walls are 14" thick solid brick with 2" of plaster on each side. Our noise issue comes from the door into the room leaking sound. I put extra rubber weatherstripping around the perimeter and a well-fitting wood baseplate on the floor so that the gap between the floor and the bottom of the door is well sealed with a rubber flapper thing on the inside of the door.
If you can't or don't want to rip out the wall, there are some spray in insulation foams that I've heard work really well. If you have access to the full wall, you would locate your studs first, then drill a little 1/2" hole halfway up the wall between each stud and then again up top near the ceiling.
The material comes in a can that looks like a 5 gallon propane tank and has a little nozzle that fits in the hole.
http://expandingfoaminsulationguide.com/expanding-foam-wall-insulation/
Without experience, this is not a DIY job. I used to install this stuff professionally. The foam insulation expands rapidly and exerts a tremendous amount of hydraulic pressure that can very easily (and has) popped your wall material right off the studs and creates a wonderful mess that is not easy to remove. This does work provided you have empty wall cavities, but it's best left to the pros.
.
Proud Texan said:
Without experience, this is not a DIY job. I used to install this stuff professionally. The foam insulation expands rapidly and exerts a tremendous amount of hydraulic pressure that can very easily (and has) popped your wall material right off the studs and creates a wonderful mess that is not easy to remove. This does work provided you have empty wall cavities, but it's best left to the pros.
Just throwing ideas out there.
They are now making a formualtion that isn't that aggressive on the expansion for that very reason, and he never said what all of his conditions were.
If he wants to solve an issue and be assured that the results will be sufficient, then hiring a professional would make sense to me whichever method worked best.
Probably would shorten the time that the room would be off limits too. Get the contractor in, get them out and be done with it, so the room can get back into circulation.
 

TripHoss

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The key to actually stopping the transmission of sound is mass. The suggestion to off set studs and create a second wall is a ggod one, as it stops the transmission of the vibrations (bass) there is also a product called mass loaded vinyl:
http://www.acousticalsolutions.com/products/blocking/sound_barrier.asp?gclid=CMCj3pLS1JsCFQ9JagodrzmjLQ
It is nor easy to work with, i'd recommend an installer, but it works geat. I own a night clib as well as an Inn (not in the same building) and we used the mass loaded Vinyl to stop the sound for getting into a neighbor's building. I am a pretty experienced DYI builder, but we ended up hiring an installer to make it work.
 

Suzie Q

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Order out....
...or I like, fire rates wall board plaster .Comes in 4'X8' sheets.I have used it here it does cut lots of noise.Also is very very heavy.Mary@Bridgewater,Va..
Well... we have been doing more of that than I'd like, but hubby likes to get up in the middle of the night and putter around in the kitchen, unfortunately, run the dishwasher, etc.! One good thing about our new, second room, is it is off the dining room, relatively far away from the kitchen, and the bed is a good 25' on the opposite side of the room.
Will probably do the door thing first, probably least expensive and time consuming. We had insulation (glass) blown into our new addition, but the drywall wasn't up yet. So far, so good with the insulation on that room. The floors are some type of cementboard with joists 12" apart for our ceramic tile floors. The only thing I can hear with the guests directly above our bedroom is the heavy footsteps.
C
 

Proud Texan

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This is assuming you have a studs and gypsum board wall.
Minimal: insulate the interior wall. This does not completely cut sound transmission but will greatly reduce it. If you can find the right contractor, you don't have to even remove the wall covering. The insulation can be blown in through small holes that can be patched.
Best: Remove the wall board from one side. Centered on the cavity between two studs, introduce a second stud that is slightly offset from the two surrounding it. It should NOT be touching the wall board on the other side. The new studs will hangover the base plate by about an inch. Insulate the wall with fiberglass batts. Replace the wall board nailing ONLY onto the new offset studs. What this does is prevent the transmission of sound vibration through the studs to the wall board on the opposite side of the wall.
When we built our cottages, we built them in such a way that the shared a common bathroom wall. I essentially built a double wall, insulating both walls. There is absolutely no sound transmission. We did the "yell" test and the person on the other side couldn't hear a thing.
 

swirt

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The key to actually stopping the transmission of sound is mass. The suggestion to off set studs and create a second wall is a ggod one, as it stops the transmission of the vibrations (bass) there is also a product called mass loaded vinyl:
http://www.acousticalsolutions.com/products/blocking/sound_barrier.asp?gclid=CMCj3pLS1JsCFQ9JagodrzmjLQ
It is nor easy to work with, i'd recommend an installer, but it works geat. I own a night clib as well as an Inn (not in the same building) and we used the mass loaded Vinyl to stop the sound for getting into a neighbor's building. I am a pretty experienced DYI builder, but we ended up hiring an installer to make it work..
Welcome TripHoss,
That's a good suggestion. I have a cousin that built a recording studio in his basement and used that (or something similar) to limit sound transmission both into and out of the studio. I had forgottne about it until you mentioned it.
 

Morticia

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Order out....
...or I like, fire rates wall board plaster .Comes in 4'X8' sheets.I have used it here it does cut lots of noise.Also is very very heavy.Mary@Bridgewater,Va..
Well... we have been doing more of that than I'd like, but hubby likes to get up in the middle of the night and putter around in the kitchen, unfortunately, run the dishwasher, etc.! One good thing about our new, second room, is it is off the dining room, relatively far away from the kitchen, and the bed is a good 25' on the opposite side of the room.
Will probably do the door thing first, probably least expensive and time consuming. We had insulation (glass) blown into our new addition, but the drywall wasn't up yet. So far, so good with the insulation on that room. The floors are some type of cementboard with joists 12" apart for our ceramic tile floors. The only thing I can hear with the guests directly above our bedroom is the heavy footsteps.
C
.
Not just running the dishwasher, mine loves to start the ice machine up! Hisssssssss, thunk. Hisssssssss, thunk.
 

MooseTrax

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Wonderful topic and very timely. I notice all the ads are now for acoustical tiles and other sound-deadening materials. Will take a look later.
 

MommyTaylor

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Hi everyone, I have been checking into soundproofing for my office, and have found many DIY options, but I guess it depends on the type of building too - suggestions from an additional sheet of drywall over the top of the existing with a soundproofing glue applied between the sheets, to the more intense set ups suggested by others, to ceiling tiles. There are many options - I'd be happy to provide a website or link if you'd like. I am new to the boards and not sure what the rules are about including links and site within the posts. TTFN, Erin
 

Morticia

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Hi everyone, I have been checking into soundproofing for my office, and have found many DIY options, but I guess it depends on the type of building too - suggestions from an additional sheet of drywall over the top of the existing with a soundproofing glue applied between the sheets, to the more intense set ups suggested by others, to ceiling tiles. There are many options - I'd be happy to provide a website or link if you'd like. I am new to the boards and not sure what the rules are about including links and site within the posts. TTFN, Erin.
MommyTaylor said:
Hi everyone, I have been checking into soundproofing for my office, and have found many DIY options, but I guess it depends on the type of building too - suggestions from an additional sheet of drywall over the top of the existing with a soundproofing glue applied between the sheets, to the more intense set ups suggested by others, to ceiling tiles. There are many options - I'd be happy to provide a website or link if you'd like. I am new to the boards and not sure what the rules are about including links and site within the posts. TTFN, Erin
Including links to other websites that may be of help is welcome. Including links to a website that belongs to you if you don't mention it belongs to you and you are touting this as a great product is not allowed.
 

MommyTaylor

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Hi everyone, I have been checking into soundproofing for my office, and have found many DIY options, but I guess it depends on the type of building too - suggestions from an additional sheet of drywall over the top of the existing with a soundproofing glue applied between the sheets, to the more intense set ups suggested by others, to ceiling tiles. There are many options - I'd be happy to provide a website or link if you'd like. I am new to the boards and not sure what the rules are about including links and site within the posts. TTFN, Erin.
MommyTaylor said:
Hi everyone, I have been checking into soundproofing for my office, and have found many DIY options, but I guess it depends on the type of building too - suggestions from an additional sheet of drywall over the top of the existing with a soundproofing glue applied between the sheets, to the more intense set ups suggested by others, to ceiling tiles. There are many options - I'd be happy to provide a website or link if you'd like. I am new to the boards and not sure what the rules are about including links and site within the posts. TTFN, Erin
Including links to other websites that may be of help is welcome. Including links to a website that belongs to you if you don't mention it belongs to you and you are touting this as a great product is not allowed.
.
Thanks Bree for clarifying that for me. I am not affiliated with either website at all, and they both have what I think is great information.
www.greenglue.com - this is the soundproof glue stuff
www.soundproofing101.com - a plethera of DIY info on soundproofing.
Hope this helps someone, anyone. TTFN, Erin
 
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