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paulavery

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I don't think it is likely to get funding. If you do, I'd love to hear about that.
 

EmptyNest

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Good luck to you. BUt in this economy...bad timing. :-(
 

ProjectBBGreen

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Completely understand the current economic state. However, I am more curious to know your opinions towards online courses and suggestions for building my resume when/if I propose the project for funding.
Outside of reading books, what are your opinions on sites such as http://www.bedandbreakfastinstitute.com.au?
 

Innkeep

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Completely understand the current economic state. However, I am more curious to know your opinions towards online courses and suggestions for building my resume when/if I propose the project for funding.
Outside of reading books, what are your opinions on sites such as http://www.bedandbreakfastinstitute.com.au?.
I knew you were asking about the online course, but hesitated to chime in before everybody else had a chance. During the 2 years I spent as an aspiring innkeeper, I never came across any online courses, nor did I have anyone recommend to me that I should take one. I don't think I'd take a course from an Australian website, because any discussion they have about specific legal requirements or methods of financing a business could be quite different. For that amount of money you might be better served by taking some hospitality courses at a community college where you would be better able to find the time to take a course or two while working at your regular job, or if you can't do that, I think you could make your own curriculum for online courses that relate to starting a small business, food handling or whatever you think you need to know, and I suspect that would be the way to add to your resume.
In terms of how to run a bed and breakfast, I found the advice from these "innmates" on this forum to be priceless, and of more value than the aspiring innkeeper classes I attended. I would recommend that you try to read all of the threads here to see both the stuff we all have in common as well as the things that make us different. Having a passion for saving an old house is one thing, and dealing with the public 24/7 is something altogether different. At least one of our forum members worked at a larger B&B before taking the plunge to start her own, perhaps she can chime in about that experience.
Partnerships where one partner has the $$$ and the other partner runs the B&B can turn out to be particularly frustrating if the $$$ partner is interested in saving the house but doesn't know anything about bed and breakfasts. From a purely investment standpoint it can take a very long time to make a decent return on the investor's money. If the investor is mostly going to look at the bottom line, in order for you to fill rooms you will need to be in a location where people will need overnight accommodations. If the place is seasonal, your investor will need to know that from the outset.
Best of luck to you. Just be sure you have the right balance between love for the historic old house and the reality of running a B&B! And always find out about the zoning before you do anything else.
 

EmptyNest

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Completely understand the current economic state. However, I am more curious to know your opinions towards online courses and suggestions for building my resume when/if I propose the project for funding.
Outside of reading books, what are your opinions on sites such as http://www.bedandbreakfastinstitute.com.au?.
Only take the aussie course if that is where you are. There are plenty of aspiring innkeeper courses being offered all around the U.S. you should take one or more of them.
 

white pine

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We are also aspiring, and my DH does historic preservation consulting and compliance. We are close to finally closing on our property which is on the Nat'l Register of Historic Places.
Re.: B&B's check out all the threads here and the Resources links. Also go to PAII's site and check out information there. Buy some books on becoming and innkeeper and running a B&B. Consider the aspiring workshops thru PAII or regional associations. I would also look into local colleges for appropriate courses if I wanted to have something on a resume.
That said, I agree there has to be a market in the location for this place as a B&B. Understand that in dealing with old structures, most people believe there is funding out there in the form of grants. THERE ISN'T. The best case scenario is that you may find that partner to put up money, but this IMHO is a BAD mix. What are your motivations? If you think you will make money or even enough to provide a living for yourself this is probably not going to happen. If you have some money to pour into this, and are prepared to lose it,, and think this is a better place to do so than the stock market, OK. If you can't live with losing large sums of money, DON'T take this on.
There ARE tax credits available to offset the renovation costs. Properties must be listed and plans approved before work begins. Check with your State Historic Preservation Office; also ask them about what preservation or conservation easements can do to reduce property taxes. You may want to consider either forming a non-profit or teaming with a non-profit in this project; however most of them don't have money to burn either right now. I also think they may not want the liability of a business like this, but it is an option to explore. Sorry to be so negative, we love old buildings and support your desire to save this. Sadly, it always comes down to money; or the lack of it.
 

domsmom

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We are also aspiring, and my DH does historic preservation consulting and compliance. We are close to finally closing on our property which is on the Nat'l Register of Historic Places.
Re.: B&B's check out all the threads here and the Resources links. Also go to PAII's site and check out information there. Buy some books on becoming and innkeeper and running a B&B. Consider the aspiring workshops thru PAII or regional associations. I would also look into local colleges for appropriate courses if I wanted to have something on a resume.
That said, I agree there has to be a market in the location for this place as a B&B. Understand that in dealing with old structures, most people believe there is funding out there in the form of grants. THERE ISN'T. The best case scenario is that you may find that partner to put up money, but this IMHO is a BAD mix. What are your motivations? If you think you will make money or even enough to provide a living for yourself this is probably not going to happen. If you have some money to pour into this, and are prepared to lose it,, and think this is a better place to do so than the stock market, OK. If you can't live with losing large sums of money, DON'T take this on.
There ARE tax credits available to offset the renovation costs. Properties must be listed and plans approved before work begins. Check with your State Historic Preservation Office; also ask them about what preservation or conservation easements can do to reduce property taxes. You may want to consider either forming a non-profit or teaming with a non-profit in this project; however most of them don't have money to burn either right now. I also think they may not want the liability of a business like this, but it is an option to explore. Sorry to be so negative, we love old buildings and support your desire to save this. Sadly, it always comes down to money; or the lack of it..
Along with B&B information, check with your local SBA support network.
In my city there is a neighborhood organization that offers very inexpensive small business classes. They were a great asset in regards to the business aspects of what I do. Marketing, networking, accounting, etc are just as essential as a delicious breakfast, clean accommodations and enjoying your guests.
 

Leonardo

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Mar 6, 2010
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We are also aspiring, and my DH does historic preservation consulting and compliance. We are close to finally closing on our property which is on the Nat'l Register of Historic Places.
Re.: B&B's check out all the threads here and the Resources links. Also go to PAII's site and check out information there. Buy some books on becoming and innkeeper and running a B&B. Consider the aspiring workshops thru PAII or regional associations. I would also look into local colleges for appropriate courses if I wanted to have something on a resume.
That said, I agree there has to be a market in the location for this place as a B&B. Understand that in dealing with old structures, most people believe there is funding out there in the form of grants. THERE ISN'T. The best case scenario is that you may find that partner to put up money, but this IMHO is a BAD mix. What are your motivations? If you think you will make money or even enough to provide a living for yourself this is probably not going to happen. If you have some money to pour into this, and are prepared to lose it,, and think this is a better place to do so than the stock market, OK. If you can't live with losing large sums of money, DON'T take this on.
There ARE tax credits available to offset the renovation costs. Properties must be listed and plans approved before work begins. Check with your State Historic Preservation Office; also ask them about what preservation or conservation easements can do to reduce property taxes. You may want to consider either forming a non-profit or teaming with a non-profit in this project; however most of them don't have money to burn either right now. I also think they may not want the liability of a business like this, but it is an option to explore. Sorry to be so negative, we love old buildings and support your desire to save this. Sadly, it always comes down to money; or the lack of it..
I'd stay off the "Register" if I were you. Although it sounds like a good idea and is "trendy" you will find that the restrictions placed on work being done or being planned to your building make life "difficult and expensive". I've owned a home on the historic trust and was glad I sold it but I still live in a State curatorship and the rules are always changing. This months change is all curators "Must" be lead paint certified to work on their own houses. I was certified in the past but new EPA rules have been put in place and recert must be done ($1250). Keep control and full ownership of your home for yourself. Leonard, at Waterman's Overnight
 

white pine

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Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
939
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0
We are also aspiring, and my DH does historic preservation consulting and compliance. We are close to finally closing on our property which is on the Nat'l Register of Historic Places.
Re.: B&B's check out all the threads here and the Resources links. Also go to PAII's site and check out information there. Buy some books on becoming and innkeeper and running a B&B. Consider the aspiring workshops thru PAII or regional associations. I would also look into local colleges for appropriate courses if I wanted to have something on a resume.
That said, I agree there has to be a market in the location for this place as a B&B. Understand that in dealing with old structures, most people believe there is funding out there in the form of grants. THERE ISN'T. The best case scenario is that you may find that partner to put up money, but this IMHO is a BAD mix. What are your motivations? If you think you will make money or even enough to provide a living for yourself this is probably not going to happen. If you have some money to pour into this, and are prepared to lose it,, and think this is a better place to do so than the stock market, OK. If you can't live with losing large sums of money, DON'T take this on.
There ARE tax credits available to offset the renovation costs. Properties must be listed and plans approved before work begins. Check with your State Historic Preservation Office; also ask them about what preservation or conservation easements can do to reduce property taxes. You may want to consider either forming a non-profit or teaming with a non-profit in this project; however most of them don't have money to burn either right now. I also think they may not want the liability of a business like this, but it is an option to explore. Sorry to be so negative, we love old buildings and support your desire to save this. Sadly, it always comes down to money; or the lack of it..
I'd stay off the "Register" if I were you. Although it sounds like a good idea and is "trendy" you will find that the restrictions placed on work being done or being planned to your building make life "difficult and expensive". I've owned a home on the historic trust and was glad I sold it but I still live in a State curatorship and the rules are always changing. This months change is all curators "Must" be lead paint certified to work on their own houses. I was certified in the past but new EPA rules have been put in place and recert must be done ($1250). Keep control and full ownership of your home for yourself. Leonard, at Waterman's Overnight
.
Rules vary at the local, state and federal level for historic properties.
Being listed on the National Register of Historic Places (federal level) places NO restrictions on what a property owner CAN do to their own property. It is honorary, and protects the property against projects using federal funding (roads, power lines, etc.) If you choose to vinyl side it and muck it up the worst that can happen is that you will lose your register status and not be eligible for tax credits. You give up NO ownership of the property.
If you choose to do renovation, and use tax credits, then yes, you do have to do them to the Secretary of the Interior's standards. This is co-ordinated at the state level at the State Historic Preservation Office. We have met with our reviewer and showed him our plans; he made practical money saving suggestions which we were pleasantly surprised by. For us, the federal and state tax credits will total 30% of the renovation costs, and can be carried forward against our income tax.
The greatest restrictions are placed on properties by the local communities, and these can have "teeth". It is from dealing with these that the Nat'l Register Listings a bad rep. Granting preservation or conservation easements can also limit what you can do, but in most instances you negotiate these, and they do help to reduce the tax burden.
Dealing with lead paint is an expensive pain. Certification to work on your own house seems extreme; but I do know all contractors dealing with old paint (pre 1978), must be. Personally, I think the lead paint thing is over-blown.
 

Leonardo

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Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Messages
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We are also aspiring, and my DH does historic preservation consulting and compliance. We are close to finally closing on our property which is on the Nat'l Register of Historic Places.
Re.: B&B's check out all the threads here and the Resources links. Also go to PAII's site and check out information there. Buy some books on becoming and innkeeper and running a B&B. Consider the aspiring workshops thru PAII or regional associations. I would also look into local colleges for appropriate courses if I wanted to have something on a resume.
That said, I agree there has to be a market in the location for this place as a B&B. Understand that in dealing with old structures, most people believe there is funding out there in the form of grants. THERE ISN'T. The best case scenario is that you may find that partner to put up money, but this IMHO is a BAD mix. What are your motivations? If you think you will make money or even enough to provide a living for yourself this is probably not going to happen. If you have some money to pour into this, and are prepared to lose it,, and think this is a better place to do so than the stock market, OK. If you can't live with losing large sums of money, DON'T take this on.
There ARE tax credits available to offset the renovation costs. Properties must be listed and plans approved before work begins. Check with your State Historic Preservation Office; also ask them about what preservation or conservation easements can do to reduce property taxes. You may want to consider either forming a non-profit or teaming with a non-profit in this project; however most of them don't have money to burn either right now. I also think they may not want the liability of a business like this, but it is an option to explore. Sorry to be so negative, we love old buildings and support your desire to save this. Sadly, it always comes down to money; or the lack of it..
I'd stay off the "Register" if I were you. Although it sounds like a good idea and is "trendy" you will find that the restrictions placed on work being done or being planned to your building make life "difficult and expensive". I've owned a home on the historic trust and was glad I sold it but I still live in a State curatorship and the rules are always changing. This months change is all curators "Must" be lead paint certified to work on their own houses. I was certified in the past but new EPA rules have been put in place and recert must be done ($1250). Keep control and full ownership of your home for yourself. Leonard, at Waterman's Overnight
.
Rules vary at the local, state and federal level for historic properties.
Being listed on the National Register of Historic Places (federal level) places NO restrictions on what a property owner CAN do to their own property. It is honorary, and protects the property against projects using federal funding (roads, power lines, etc.) If you choose to vinyl side it and muck it up the worst that can happen is that you will lose your register status and not be eligible for tax credits. You give up NO ownership of the property.
If you choose to do renovation, and use tax credits, then yes, you do have to do them to the Secretary of the Interior's standards. This is co-ordinated at the state level at the State Historic Preservation Office. We have met with our reviewer and showed him our plans; he made practical money saving suggestions which we were pleasantly surprised by. For us, the federal and state tax credits will total 30% of the renovation costs, and can be carried forward against our income tax.
The greatest restrictions are placed on properties by the local communities, and these can have "teeth". It is from dealing with these that the Nat'l Register Listings a bad rep. Granting preservation or conservation easements can also limit what you can do, but in most instances you negotiate these, and they do help to reduce the tax burden.
Dealing with lead paint is an expensive pain. Certification to work on your own house seems extreme; but I do know all contractors dealing with old paint (pre 1978), must be. Personally, I think the lead paint thing is over-blown.
.
We were restricted in everything from colors to the type of roofing material as well as plants in the garden. Getting off the list was the best thing that ever happened to me. And now we have to retrain for lead paint abatement. It never ends. If you can stay off the list. And this is from first hand experiences.
 

white pine

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Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
939
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We are also aspiring, and my DH does historic preservation consulting and compliance. We are close to finally closing on our property which is on the Nat'l Register of Historic Places.
Re.: B&B's check out all the threads here and the Resources links. Also go to PAII's site and check out information there. Buy some books on becoming and innkeeper and running a B&B. Consider the aspiring workshops thru PAII or regional associations. I would also look into local colleges for appropriate courses if I wanted to have something on a resume.
That said, I agree there has to be a market in the location for this place as a B&B. Understand that in dealing with old structures, most people believe there is funding out there in the form of grants. THERE ISN'T. The best case scenario is that you may find that partner to put up money, but this IMHO is a BAD mix. What are your motivations? If you think you will make money or even enough to provide a living for yourself this is probably not going to happen. If you have some money to pour into this, and are prepared to lose it,, and think this is a better place to do so than the stock market, OK. If you can't live with losing large sums of money, DON'T take this on.
There ARE tax credits available to offset the renovation costs. Properties must be listed and plans approved before work begins. Check with your State Historic Preservation Office; also ask them about what preservation or conservation easements can do to reduce property taxes. You may want to consider either forming a non-profit or teaming with a non-profit in this project; however most of them don't have money to burn either right now. I also think they may not want the liability of a business like this, but it is an option to explore. Sorry to be so negative, we love old buildings and support your desire to save this. Sadly, it always comes down to money; or the lack of it..
I'd stay off the "Register" if I were you. Although it sounds like a good idea and is "trendy" you will find that the restrictions placed on work being done or being planned to your building make life "difficult and expensive". I've owned a home on the historic trust and was glad I sold it but I still live in a State curatorship and the rules are always changing. This months change is all curators "Must" be lead paint certified to work on their own houses. I was certified in the past but new EPA rules have been put in place and recert must be done ($1250). Keep control and full ownership of your home for yourself. Leonard, at Waterman's Overnight
.
Rules vary at the local, state and federal level for historic properties.
Being listed on the National Register of Historic Places (federal level) places NO restrictions on what a property owner CAN do to their own property. It is honorary, and protects the property against projects using federal funding (roads, power lines, etc.) If you choose to vinyl side it and muck it up the worst that can happen is that you will lose your register status and not be eligible for tax credits. You give up NO ownership of the property.
If you choose to do renovation, and use tax credits, then yes, you do have to do them to the Secretary of the Interior's standards. This is co-ordinated at the state level at the State Historic Preservation Office. We have met with our reviewer and showed him our plans; he made practical money saving suggestions which we were pleasantly surprised by. For us, the federal and state tax credits will total 30% of the renovation costs, and can be carried forward against our income tax.
The greatest restrictions are placed on properties by the local communities, and these can have "teeth". It is from dealing with these that the Nat'l Register Listings a bad rep. Granting preservation or conservation easements can also limit what you can do, but in most instances you negotiate these, and they do help to reduce the tax burden.
Dealing with lead paint is an expensive pain. Certification to work on your own house seems extreme; but I do know all contractors dealing with old paint (pre 1978), must be. Personally, I think the lead paint thing is over-blown.
.
We were restricted in everything from colors to the type of roofing material as well as plants in the garden. Getting off the list was the best thing that ever happened to me. And now we have to retrain for lead paint abatement. It never ends. If you can stay off the list. And this is from first hand experiences.
.
Sorry you have had such a poor experience. We have had one previous Nat'l Reg. property and one State Reg. property. DH does historic preservation consulting, and worked at the state historic preservation office doing the state and national register reviews.
You say "the list"-- point is there isn't just one. You are dealing with LOCAL regulations given your location. There really ARE NOT any regulations for privately funded modifications on National Register Listings. Your property may or may not be on the National Register of Historic Places, but the REGULATIONS are happening on a LOCAL level. Many areas of the country have NO LOCAL HISTORIC REGULATIONS.
You mention curating, which makes me think you may be involved in a non-ownership/lease type of arrangement with the state or local government of a historic structure, which involves abiding by their rules.
 

Leonardo

Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
We are also aspiring, and my DH does historic preservation consulting and compliance. We are close to finally closing on our property which is on the Nat'l Register of Historic Places.
Re.: B&B's check out all the threads here and the Resources links. Also go to PAII's site and check out information there. Buy some books on becoming and innkeeper and running a B&B. Consider the aspiring workshops thru PAII or regional associations. I would also look into local colleges for appropriate courses if I wanted to have something on a resume.
That said, I agree there has to be a market in the location for this place as a B&B. Understand that in dealing with old structures, most people believe there is funding out there in the form of grants. THERE ISN'T. The best case scenario is that you may find that partner to put up money, but this IMHO is a BAD mix. What are your motivations? If you think you will make money or even enough to provide a living for yourself this is probably not going to happen. If you have some money to pour into this, and are prepared to lose it,, and think this is a better place to do so than the stock market, OK. If you can't live with losing large sums of money, DON'T take this on.
There ARE tax credits available to offset the renovation costs. Properties must be listed and plans approved before work begins. Check with your State Historic Preservation Office; also ask them about what preservation or conservation easements can do to reduce property taxes. You may want to consider either forming a non-profit or teaming with a non-profit in this project; however most of them don't have money to burn either right now. I also think they may not want the liability of a business like this, but it is an option to explore. Sorry to be so negative, we love old buildings and support your desire to save this. Sadly, it always comes down to money; or the lack of it..
I'd stay off the "Register" if I were you. Although it sounds like a good idea and is "trendy" you will find that the restrictions placed on work being done or being planned to your building make life "difficult and expensive". I've owned a home on the historic trust and was glad I sold it but I still live in a State curatorship and the rules are always changing. This months change is all curators "Must" be lead paint certified to work on their own houses. I was certified in the past but new EPA rules have been put in place and recert must be done ($1250). Keep control and full ownership of your home for yourself. Leonard, at Waterman's Overnight
.
Rules vary at the local, state and federal level for historic properties.
Being listed on the National Register of Historic Places (federal level) places NO restrictions on what a property owner CAN do to their own property. It is honorary, and protects the property against projects using federal funding (roads, power lines, etc.) If you choose to vinyl side it and muck it up the worst that can happen is that you will lose your register status and not be eligible for tax credits. You give up NO ownership of the property.
If you choose to do renovation, and use tax credits, then yes, you do have to do them to the Secretary of the Interior's standards. This is co-ordinated at the state level at the State Historic Preservation Office. We have met with our reviewer and showed him our plans; he made practical money saving suggestions which we were pleasantly surprised by. For us, the federal and state tax credits will total 30% of the renovation costs, and can be carried forward against our income tax.
The greatest restrictions are placed on properties by the local communities, and these can have "teeth". It is from dealing with these that the Nat'l Register Listings a bad rep. Granting preservation or conservation easements can also limit what you can do, but in most instances you negotiate these, and they do help to reduce the tax burden.
Dealing with lead paint is an expensive pain. Certification to work on your own house seems extreme; but I do know all contractors dealing with old paint (pre 1978), must be. Personally, I think the lead paint thing is over-blown.
.
We were restricted in everything from colors to the type of roofing material as well as plants in the garden. Getting off the list was the best thing that ever happened to me. And now we have to retrain for lead paint abatement. It never ends. If you can stay off the list. And this is from first hand experiences.
.
Sorry you have had such a poor experience. We have had one previous Nat'l Reg. property and one State Reg. property. DH does historic preservation consulting, and worked at the state historic preservation office doing the state and national register reviews.
You say "the list"-- point is there isn't just one. You are dealing with LOCAL regulations given your location. There really ARE NOT any regulations for privately funded modifications on National Register Listings. Your property may or may not be on the National Register of Historic Places, but the REGULATIONS are happening on a LOCAL level. Many areas of the country have NO LOCAL HISTORIC REGULATIONS.
You mention curating, which makes me think you may be involved in a non-ownership/lease type of arrangement with the state or local government of a historic structure, which involves abiding by their rules.
.
Yes, I have my B&B plus I have a curatorship for the past 22 years. In the early years it was worth getting into but with all the new restrictions and investments I think it's best to stay out. Since we have gotten through all the expensive years and are down to routine "fix-em-ups" it's not too bad but if you don't have $250-$300,000 sitting around and don't mind giving it away I'd stay away. Some times those "gift horses" are just that and all they give you in return is what comes out the other end.
 
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