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What are Employee Innkeepers Paid?

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seashanty

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for those of you who are employed as innkeepers ... or who know some ... what are innkeepers paid? considering a possible opportunity, i am not sure what is reasonable.
i have heard room/board/small salary and commission based on gross sales.
hmmm ... perhaps you would want to email me privately if you'd rather not discuss what you are paid on forum.
i can really use some advice ... so i welcome anyone to jump in with cautions, advice, etc.
i realize that owner innkeepers are a whole 'nother thing.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Pay for innkeepers is, literally, all over the map.
I've worked for large inns (20+ rooms) who had been paying full-time innkeepers $10/hour prior to my employment. I declined to work for that myself and negotiated a much more reasonable rate.
I've worked for small inns who paid $20+ per hour to part-timers, realizing they were critical to the business - and wanting to recruit excellent employees who stayed longterm.
I hear of managing innkeepers getting paid $20k plus housing (like the guy in Florida wants to pay) and I wonder what kind of expectation there would be for real excellence. Are they just looking for a front-desk person who minds the store but doesn't really care? If so, that's exactly what they'll get.
Managing innkeepers won't be building up equity, won't be reaping the benefits of their success 10 years down the road. Unless they're incented to stay.
As for me, in my most recent longterm (3 year) gig, I was paid $55k (with 4-weeks paid vacation) to manage a 7-room inn. Since the place had ALWAYS lost money in the past - and broke even in my first year of management, then made sizeable profits in each following year - the owners were happy to pay it.
And that's really the key. You can demand a decent and respectable salary as an employee-innkeeper. The owner just needs to be convinced that you're worth it. Then you need to make sure you prove to them that you really are worth it, each and every day.
And, of course, that means bringing in guests who'll come back again and again, raising your ADR/revPAR beyond the competitors, and getting media attention as the best inn in the area. In short, doing an even better job than most owner-innkeepers.
If you can do that, you'll always have significant value as an employee.
 

EmptyNest

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Just one big caution. DO NOT GIVE IT AWAY. In an attempt at a position, you may want to take less...DON't! You will regret it. Make them pay you for what you are worth!
 

kattrin

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Prior to purchasing the Inn, we were compensated $30,000 a year including living quarters. We did everything including all landscaping, repairs, cooking, cleaning, marketing, bookkeeping, etc. As far as I am concerned, we were underpaid but I am sure the past owners might not agree with me. Remember - this is a 24/7 job and you don't get a day off unless you are not doing your job correctly. Are you getting benefits, insurance, 401K, retirement plan? You need to take care of those yourself if your employer is not doing it. I know times are tough but not everyone can do this job - if you can, then you need to be compensated for your skills.
 

seashanty

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wow. i have had no offers like this at all. hmmmm.
 

Morticia

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Pay for innkeepers is, literally, all over the map.
I've worked for large inns (20+ rooms) who had been paying full-time innkeepers $10/hour prior to my employment. I declined to work for that myself and negotiated a much more reasonable rate.
I've worked for small inns who paid $20+ per hour to part-timers, realizing they were critical to the business - and wanting to recruit excellent employees who stayed longterm.
I hear of managing innkeepers getting paid $20k plus housing (like the guy in Florida wants to pay) and I wonder what kind of expectation there would be for real excellence. Are they just looking for a front-desk person who minds the store but doesn't really care? If so, that's exactly what they'll get.
Managing innkeepers won't be building up equity, won't be reaping the benefits of their success 10 years down the road. Unless they're incented to stay.
As for me, in my most recent longterm (3 year) gig, I was paid $55k (with 4-weeks paid vacation) to manage a 7-room inn. Since the place had ALWAYS lost money in the past - and broke even in my first year of management, then made sizeable profits in each following year - the owners were happy to pay it.
And that's really the key. You can demand a decent and respectable salary as an employee-innkeeper. The owner just needs to be convinced that you're worth it. Then you need to make sure you prove to them that you really are worth it, each and every day.
And, of course, that means bringing in guests who'll come back again and again, raising your ADR/revPAR beyond the competitors, and getting media attention as the best inn in the area. In short, doing an even better job than most owner-innkeepers.
If you can do that, you'll always have significant value as an employee..
Holy cow. $55k? For me to pay out that kind of money, my B&B would have to be pulling in over $200k.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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wow. i have had no offers like this at all. hmmmm..
The thing is, you're not likely to get an offer like that. You're going to have to negotiate for it.
The only way I am able to get owners to pay me more is that I am able to show them a plan to not only make my salary affordable but to make the owner a good profit as well.
Do some homework on the inn you're considering. What are they doing wonderfully that you can learn from? And where do they have areas for improvement that you can impact? How will you do that? How will it benefit the guest and bring new business? How will it help the owner?
Give the owners the answers to those questions and you can get them to double whatever offer you're getting.
Just show them why they should. And then prove to them that they made a good decision.
 

seashanty

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Pay for innkeepers is, literally, all over the map.
I've worked for large inns (20+ rooms) who had been paying full-time innkeepers $10/hour prior to my employment. I declined to work for that myself and negotiated a much more reasonable rate.
I've worked for small inns who paid $20+ per hour to part-timers, realizing they were critical to the business - and wanting to recruit excellent employees who stayed longterm.
I hear of managing innkeepers getting paid $20k plus housing (like the guy in Florida wants to pay) and I wonder what kind of expectation there would be for real excellence. Are they just looking for a front-desk person who minds the store but doesn't really care? If so, that's exactly what they'll get.
Managing innkeepers won't be building up equity, won't be reaping the benefits of their success 10 years down the road. Unless they're incented to stay.
As for me, in my most recent longterm (3 year) gig, I was paid $55k (with 4-weeks paid vacation) to manage a 7-room inn. Since the place had ALWAYS lost money in the past - and broke even in my first year of management, then made sizeable profits in each following year - the owners were happy to pay it.
And that's really the key. You can demand a decent and respectable salary as an employee-innkeeper. The owner just needs to be convinced that you're worth it. Then you need to make sure you prove to them that you really are worth it, each and every day.
And, of course, that means bringing in guests who'll come back again and again, raising your ADR/revPAR beyond the competitors, and getting media attention as the best inn in the area. In short, doing an even better job than most owner-innkeepers.
If you can do that, you'll always have significant value as an employee..
Innkeeper To Go said:
As for me, in my most recent longterm (3 year) gig, I was paid $55k (with 4-weeks paid vacation) to manage a 7-room inn. Since the place had ALWAYS lost money in the past - and broke even in my first year of management, then made sizeable profits in each following year - the owners were happy to pay it.
can i ask what happened with that 3 year position? did it stop working out? you are speaking about it in past tense.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Pay for innkeepers is, literally, all over the map.
I've worked for large inns (20+ rooms) who had been paying full-time innkeepers $10/hour prior to my employment. I declined to work for that myself and negotiated a much more reasonable rate.
I've worked for small inns who paid $20+ per hour to part-timers, realizing they were critical to the business - and wanting to recruit excellent employees who stayed longterm.
I hear of managing innkeepers getting paid $20k plus housing (like the guy in Florida wants to pay) and I wonder what kind of expectation there would be for real excellence. Are they just looking for a front-desk person who minds the store but doesn't really care? If so, that's exactly what they'll get.
Managing innkeepers won't be building up equity, won't be reaping the benefits of their success 10 years down the road. Unless they're incented to stay.
As for me, in my most recent longterm (3 year) gig, I was paid $55k (with 4-weeks paid vacation) to manage a 7-room inn. Since the place had ALWAYS lost money in the past - and broke even in my first year of management, then made sizeable profits in each following year - the owners were happy to pay it.
And that's really the key. You can demand a decent and respectable salary as an employee-innkeeper. The owner just needs to be convinced that you're worth it. Then you need to make sure you prove to them that you really are worth it, each and every day.
And, of course, that means bringing in guests who'll come back again and again, raising your ADR/revPAR beyond the competitors, and getting media attention as the best inn in the area. In short, doing an even better job than most owner-innkeepers.
If you can do that, you'll always have significant value as an employee..
Innkeeper To Go said:
As for me, in my most recent longterm (3 year) gig, I was paid $55k (with 4-weeks paid vacation) to manage a 7-room inn. Since the place had ALWAYS lost money in the past - and broke even in my first year of management, then made sizeable profits in each following year - the owners were happy to pay it.
can i ask what happened with that 3 year position? did it stop working out? you are speaking about it in past tense.
.
Yes, past tense. It was a gig that stretched much longer than I'd originally envisioned. Was to be 3 months originally. I was asked to stay a year, then another year, then another.
Finally, though, really had done all that the inn needed me to do to ensure continued success so it was time to move on.
In terms of working out, the inn went from 30% occupancy to 81%.
And, yes, when I left just a few weeks ago it was running quite good numbers even in the down economy - with 81% occupancy for this year all but guaranteed with bookings through the end of the year already strong.
Income almost tripled while expenses stayed fairly flat. Caught up on years of deferred maintenance. Added and improved amenities. Went green, reducing costs while attracting a whole new stream of guests. Raised ADR and revPAR beyond expectations.
Guest satisfaction unparalleled. Wouldn't, of course, have been able to accomplish the numbers otherwise.
Went from online invisibility to the most popular inn in a highly competitive area.
So, yes, you could say it worked out well for all.
I'm now back to doing shorter term gigs and the same operational/marketing consulting that drew the owners of that particular inn's attention in the first place.
And just as when running an inn myself, enjoying every minute of it.
Already have several new clients - many of whom were also guests at that inn so got to know my work up close. And the clients I was working with before I took on the longterm gig are happy to have me back in the fold.
Head to Santa Barbara next week for a gig, then back up to Northern California to start yet another gig immediately thereafter. Both of those 2 clients have already booked me for additional 2 week gigs later in the year.
So it's all good.
How about you?
I understand from your posts that you owned an inn and are now looking for an innkeeper position. You seem fairly flexible about where you would go.
What do you think is the major obstacle to getting you where you want to be?
 

seashanty

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Pay for innkeepers is, literally, all over the map.
I've worked for large inns (20+ rooms) who had been paying full-time innkeepers $10/hour prior to my employment. I declined to work for that myself and negotiated a much more reasonable rate.
I've worked for small inns who paid $20+ per hour to part-timers, realizing they were critical to the business - and wanting to recruit excellent employees who stayed longterm.
I hear of managing innkeepers getting paid $20k plus housing (like the guy in Florida wants to pay) and I wonder what kind of expectation there would be for real excellence. Are they just looking for a front-desk person who minds the store but doesn't really care? If so, that's exactly what they'll get.
Managing innkeepers won't be building up equity, won't be reaping the benefits of their success 10 years down the road. Unless they're incented to stay.
As for me, in my most recent longterm (3 year) gig, I was paid $55k (with 4-weeks paid vacation) to manage a 7-room inn. Since the place had ALWAYS lost money in the past - and broke even in my first year of management, then made sizeable profits in each following year - the owners were happy to pay it.
And that's really the key. You can demand a decent and respectable salary as an employee-innkeeper. The owner just needs to be convinced that you're worth it. Then you need to make sure you prove to them that you really are worth it, each and every day.
And, of course, that means bringing in guests who'll come back again and again, raising your ADR/revPAR beyond the competitors, and getting media attention as the best inn in the area. In short, doing an even better job than most owner-innkeepers.
If you can do that, you'll always have significant value as an employee..
Innkeeper To Go said:
As for me, in my most recent longterm (3 year) gig, I was paid $55k (with 4-weeks paid vacation) to manage a 7-room inn. Since the place had ALWAYS lost money in the past - and broke even in my first year of management, then made sizeable profits in each following year - the owners were happy to pay it.
can i ask what happened with that 3 year position? did it stop working out? you are speaking about it in past tense.
.
Yes, past tense. It was a gig that stretched much longer than I'd originally envisioned. Was to be 3 months originally. I was asked to stay a year, then another year, then another.
Finally, though, really had done all that the inn needed me to do to ensure continued success so it was time to move on.
In terms of working out, the inn went from 30% occupancy to 81%.
And, yes, when I left just a few weeks ago it was running quite good numbers even in the down economy - with 81% occupancy for this year all but guaranteed with bookings through the end of the year already strong.
Income almost tripled while expenses stayed fairly flat. Caught up on years of deferred maintenance. Added and improved amenities. Went green, reducing costs while attracting a whole new stream of guests. Raised ADR and revPAR beyond expectations.
Guest satisfaction unparalleled. Wouldn't, of course, have been able to accomplish the numbers otherwise.
Went from online invisibility to the most popular inn in a highly competitive area.
So, yes, you could say it worked out well for all.
I'm now back to doing shorter term gigs and the same operational/marketing consulting that drew the owners of that particular inn's attention in the first place.
And just as when running an inn myself, enjoying every minute of it.
Already have several new clients - many of whom were also guests at that inn so got to know my work up close. And the clients I was working with before I took on the longterm gig are happy to have me back in the fold.
Head to Santa Barbara next week for a gig, then back up to Northern California to start yet another gig immediately thereafter. Both of those 2 clients have already booked me for additional 2 week gigs later in the year.
So it's all good.
How about you?
I understand from your posts that you owned an inn and are now looking for an innkeeper position. You seem fairly flexible about where you would go.
What do you think is the major obstacle to getting you where you want to be?
.
THE major obstacle ... is me. i have had a few setbacks healthwise this summer that i chose not to discuss on forum.
how do you (i) sell myself as a solo innkeeper to a b&b who says ' i/we really want a couple? ' i certainly understand the 24/7 demands and the logic behind hiring a couple. but i am still solo.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Pay for innkeepers is, literally, all over the map.
I've worked for large inns (20+ rooms) who had been paying full-time innkeepers $10/hour prior to my employment. I declined to work for that myself and negotiated a much more reasonable rate.
I've worked for small inns who paid $20+ per hour to part-timers, realizing they were critical to the business - and wanting to recruit excellent employees who stayed longterm.
I hear of managing innkeepers getting paid $20k plus housing (like the guy in Florida wants to pay) and I wonder what kind of expectation there would be for real excellence. Are they just looking for a front-desk person who minds the store but doesn't really care? If so, that's exactly what they'll get.
Managing innkeepers won't be building up equity, won't be reaping the benefits of their success 10 years down the road. Unless they're incented to stay.
As for me, in my most recent longterm (3 year) gig, I was paid $55k (with 4-weeks paid vacation) to manage a 7-room inn. Since the place had ALWAYS lost money in the past - and broke even in my first year of management, then made sizeable profits in each following year - the owners were happy to pay it.
And that's really the key. You can demand a decent and respectable salary as an employee-innkeeper. The owner just needs to be convinced that you're worth it. Then you need to make sure you prove to them that you really are worth it, each and every day.
And, of course, that means bringing in guests who'll come back again and again, raising your ADR/revPAR beyond the competitors, and getting media attention as the best inn in the area. In short, doing an even better job than most owner-innkeepers.
If you can do that, you'll always have significant value as an employee..
Innkeeper To Go said:
As for me, in my most recent longterm (3 year) gig, I was paid $55k (with 4-weeks paid vacation) to manage a 7-room inn. Since the place had ALWAYS lost money in the past - and broke even in my first year of management, then made sizeable profits in each following year - the owners were happy to pay it.
can i ask what happened with that 3 year position? did it stop working out? you are speaking about it in past tense.
.
Yes, past tense. It was a gig that stretched much longer than I'd originally envisioned. Was to be 3 months originally. I was asked to stay a year, then another year, then another.
Finally, though, really had done all that the inn needed me to do to ensure continued success so it was time to move on.
In terms of working out, the inn went from 30% occupancy to 81%.
And, yes, when I left just a few weeks ago it was running quite good numbers even in the down economy - with 81% occupancy for this year all but guaranteed with bookings through the end of the year already strong.
Income almost tripled while expenses stayed fairly flat. Caught up on years of deferred maintenance. Added and improved amenities. Went green, reducing costs while attracting a whole new stream of guests. Raised ADR and revPAR beyond expectations.
Guest satisfaction unparalleled. Wouldn't, of course, have been able to accomplish the numbers otherwise.
Went from online invisibility to the most popular inn in a highly competitive area.
So, yes, you could say it worked out well for all.
I'm now back to doing shorter term gigs and the same operational/marketing consulting that drew the owners of that particular inn's attention in the first place.
And just as when running an inn myself, enjoying every minute of it.
Already have several new clients - many of whom were also guests at that inn so got to know my work up close. And the clients I was working with before I took on the longterm gig are happy to have me back in the fold.
Head to Santa Barbara next week for a gig, then back up to Northern California to start yet another gig immediately thereafter. Both of those 2 clients have already booked me for additional 2 week gigs later in the year.
So it's all good.
How about you?
I understand from your posts that you owned an inn and are now looking for an innkeeper position. You seem fairly flexible about where you would go.
What do you think is the major obstacle to getting you where you want to be?
.
THE major obstacle ... is me. i have had a few setbacks healthwise this summer that i chose not to discuss on forum.
how do you (i) sell myself as a solo innkeeper to a b&b who says ' i/we really want a couple? ' i certainly understand the 24/7 demands and the logic behind hiring a couple. but i am still solo.
.
The logic makes sense as long as they're willing to pay 2 people. If they want 2 for 1, then it's not so nice. Unfortunately, that's often the case. Especially with small inns where a couple ran it before. They figure if they did it that way, that's the best way to do it.
But the best way to deal with that is to either ignore that requirement altogether or confront it. Either way, just blow them away with who you are, what you've done before, and what that will mean for their inn.
If the budget really allows for paying 2 people, ie. a couple, then you're okay. The budget can pay you and you can hire a part-timer to fill in gaps. If there are benefits of any kind, benefits for 1 person are cheaper than benefits for 2. You have some wiggle room there in the budget from the get-go.
If the budget doesn't allow for 2 salaries, then you're going to have to show them how you will be able to impact that budget in a way that does make room for both you and either some part-time innkeepers or some money each month for a local handyman (or handywoman) who can help with assorted tasks.
Remember that the main thing that they want is someone onsite who can make sure everything that needs to get done is done. That you can do very well alone. You've done it before so let them know that. That's what they need to know.
And the apartment they're offering doesn't need to be split in two. Just some of the tasks that you'll likely need some backup on.
Find out what the couple is doing now, ie. do both work fulltime at the inn or do they split it part-time? If they're both part-timers - and that's often the set-up even if it's not often the reality - you're halfway there. How much is the couple making? Can you live on less than that and will the difference be enough to pay for part-time staff or the amount you'd budget for an occasional contractor?
And always remember that the way you will convince them to hire you is if you can show them that you can not only run the inn, you can also increase the revenue from what they're bringing in now. That's where your homework will come in.
Most owners think that the way they've been doing it is pretty much the only way to do it. And if they're running perfectly, that may be true.
But generally speaking, there's another way. Show them why it might make better sense to have a fabulous and experienced innkeeper like yourself rather than a retired couple who just want to take it easy. Ask for a 90-day trial if they're not comfortable yet. Show them what you can do.
Whatever you do, just make sure that, much like you do with guests at an inn, market yourself as strongly as you can without building up expectations you can't meet.
Exceed their expectations and you're home free.
But don't let what they're asking for dictate who you are or what you have to offer them. Most owners have some wiggle room and rarely do they find just what they're looking for.
Finding you might be just what they really need. They just don't know that yet.
You just have to tell them why that's true to get your foot in the door.
 

seashanty

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what about a place that hasn't grossed $100,000. annually yet? it's seasonal - 4 good months and one shoulder month on either end.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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what about a place that hasn't grossed $100,000. annually yet? it's seasonal - 4 good months and one shoulder month on either end..
Sure doesn't sound like they'd have the ability to afford to pay a couple.
You'd cost less so use that fact to your advantage. And with a small seasonal income, it would make much more sense for you to just have part-time assistance that you can use as necessary and feasible in those shoulder seasons.
Why haven't they grossed over $100K yet? Are they new? Is there anything about how they're operating now that's potentially keeping them from making more?
How will you be able to get them beyond that? If they're new and the low income is due to relatively low market placement, how will you improve that? Do their room rates provide value to guests and ensure that there's enough revenue coming in to cover costs and income for you as a manager and some profit for the owner, too?
If you can present a plan to improve the income well enough to substantiate your salary while making the inn profitable, the owner will likely be relieved to hear it and happy to find you.
If the income's not there yet, perhaps you can work out a gradual pay increase each quarter until you reach your goals and a bonus at year end based on reaching your goals, too.
 

Morticia

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what about a place that hasn't grossed $100,000. annually yet? it's seasonal - 4 good months and one shoulder month on either end..
Sure doesn't sound like they'd have the ability to afford to pay a couple.
You'd cost less so use that fact to your advantage. And with a small seasonal income, it would make much more sense for you to just have part-time assistance that you can use as necessary and feasible in those shoulder seasons.
Why haven't they grossed over $100K yet? Are they new? Is there anything about how they're operating now that's potentially keeping them from making more?
How will you be able to get them beyond that? If they're new and the low income is due to relatively low market placement, how will you improve that? Do their room rates provide value to guests and ensure that there's enough revenue coming in to cover costs and income for you as a manager and some profit for the owner, too?
If you can present a plan to improve the income well enough to substantiate your salary while making the inn profitable, the owner will likely be relieved to hear it and happy to find you.
If the income's not there yet, perhaps you can work out a gradual pay increase each quarter until you reach your goals and a bonus at year end based on reaching your goals, too.
.
Are you presently for hire? With your marketing ability, I could afford to pay you and me and the mortgage. Please email if you are available.
 

seashanty

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Innkeeper to go, what is your background? marketing? hospitality? degrees / experience in one or the other? how long have you been interim innkeeping?
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Innkeeper to go, what is your background? marketing? hospitality? degrees / experience in one or the other? how long have you been interim innkeeping?.
I worked for 20 years in organization development in a range of industries before I began working in hospitality. I've lived/worked throughout the US and Europe as well as in Central Asia doing leadership development, sales and marketing training, and team-building/process improvement work. Through the course of that work, I was asked to develop training programs for both management and staff at some of the leading hotels in Europe. That was almost 15 years ago and when I began working in the hospitality industry. I've never looked back.
I began working with B&Bs about 10 years ago, helping them achieve their goals through a combination of marketing, process improvement, and staff training. I work as a consultant, innsitter, and interim manager.
So I do have some good solid experience to back up my work and, granted, that does help a lot.
But you're a former inn owner so you also have a background owners will be interested in.
What's your particular experience in the industry? What are your strongest skills? Where can you really impact an inn's bottom line as well as its operation in general?
Inn owners have spent a lot of energy creating a place that is unique; they'll be especially interested in your unique skills and personality.
Pay more attention to selling those things about yourself than to any specific advertised requirements. Those requirements can fluctuate pretty quickly for the right person.
It's your job to tell the owners why that person is you and make sure you lay that out for them both simply and clearly.
It's really just like selling your inn to prospective guests. Tell them why you're special, create a vision for them of why you're perfect for them. It won't be the right fit for every inn out there. But you only need to find one perfect inn for yourself.
You can do that.
If you're interested in doing innsitting, look to the inns that are for sale. They are staying on the market far too long these days and the folks selling them are generally ready for a rest already when they decide to sell. They often need transitional help - or just a good long break. Don't wait for them to come to you or to advertise; look for them. That will not only give you income while you look for the longer term job you want, it will diversify your experience. Let other innsitters know you're available. Remember that as innkeepers themselves, they tend to be both gracious and generous. They'll refer folks your way if they can, generally speaking.
Make a plan for which area of the country you really, really want to end up in. Learn everything you can about the inns there. Make sure all of the owners of all of the inns know you and know that you want to live and work there. It won't take long for you to get someone willing to give you a try and once you have that first shot into an area, you'll find the job of your dreams.
You can do this, seashanty. There's an owner out there just praying to find someone exactly like you.
 

bbinnsitters

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what about a place that hasn't grossed $100,000. annually yet? it's seasonal - 4 good months and one shoulder month on either end..
Any interest in a full-time position in Georgetown, SC? Let me know...
For the seasonal one you could always charge according to how many rooms are rented - when rooms are rented and you are busy, you and the owner both make $$ and there is incentive for you to book rooms. I'd be happy to share my payment plan off forum with you.
 

bbinnsitters

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Innkeeper to go, what is your background? marketing? hospitality? degrees / experience in one or the other? how long have you been interim innkeeping?.
I worked for 20 years in organization development in a range of industries before I began working in hospitality. I've lived/worked throughout the US and Europe as well as in Central Asia doing leadership development, sales and marketing training, and team-building/process improvement work. Through the course of that work, I was asked to develop training programs for both management and staff at some of the leading hotels in Europe. That was almost 15 years ago and when I began working in the hospitality industry. I've never looked back.
I began working with B&Bs about 10 years ago, helping them achieve their goals through a combination of marketing, process improvement, and staff training. I work as a consultant, innsitter, and interim manager.
So I do have some good solid experience to back up my work and, granted, that does help a lot.
But you're a former inn owner so you also have a background owners will be interested in.
What's your particular experience in the industry? What are your strongest skills? Where can you really impact an inn's bottom line as well as its operation in general?
Inn owners have spent a lot of energy creating a place that is unique; they'll be especially interested in your unique skills and personality.
Pay more attention to selling those things about yourself than to any specific advertised requirements. Those requirements can fluctuate pretty quickly for the right person.
It's your job to tell the owners why that person is you and make sure you lay that out for them both simply and clearly.
It's really just like selling your inn to prospective guests. Tell them why you're special, create a vision for them of why you're perfect for them. It won't be the right fit for every inn out there. But you only need to find one perfect inn for yourself.
You can do that.
If you're interested in doing innsitting, look to the inns that are for sale. They are staying on the market far too long these days and the folks selling them are generally ready for a rest already when they decide to sell. They often need transitional help - or just a good long break. Don't wait for them to come to you or to advertise; look for them. That will not only give you income while you look for the longer term job you want, it will diversify your experience. Let other innsitters know you're available. Remember that as innkeepers themselves, they tend to be both gracious and generous. They'll refer folks your way if they can, generally speaking.
Make a plan for which area of the country you really, really want to end up in. Learn everything you can about the inns there. Make sure all of the owners of all of the inns know you and know that you want to live and work there. It won't take long for you to get someone willing to give you a try and once you have that first shot into an area, you'll find the job of your dreams.
You can do this, seashanty. There's an owner out there just praying to find someone exactly like you.
.
Amen - you are spot on on so many points! Keep up the good posts! I, personally, have also had good luck with offering my Inn-sitting services to those Inn owners looking for permanent help. It is very hard for these owners to find the right Innkeepers for their place - it has to be a good fit for everyone involved. I tell them to take their time and I can fill in until they find that perfect person.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Innkeeper to go, what is your background? marketing? hospitality? degrees / experience in one or the other? how long have you been interim innkeeping?.
I worked for 20 years in organization development in a range of industries before I began working in hospitality. I've lived/worked throughout the US and Europe as well as in Central Asia doing leadership development, sales and marketing training, and team-building/process improvement work. Through the course of that work, I was asked to develop training programs for both management and staff at some of the leading hotels in Europe. That was almost 15 years ago and when I began working in the hospitality industry. I've never looked back.
I began working with B&Bs about 10 years ago, helping them achieve their goals through a combination of marketing, process improvement, and staff training. I work as a consultant, innsitter, and interim manager.
So I do have some good solid experience to back up my work and, granted, that does help a lot.
But you're a former inn owner so you also have a background owners will be interested in.
What's your particular experience in the industry? What are your strongest skills? Where can you really impact an inn's bottom line as well as its operation in general?
Inn owners have spent a lot of energy creating a place that is unique; they'll be especially interested in your unique skills and personality.
Pay more attention to selling those things about yourself than to any specific advertised requirements. Those requirements can fluctuate pretty quickly for the right person.
It's your job to tell the owners why that person is you and make sure you lay that out for them both simply and clearly.
It's really just like selling your inn to prospective guests. Tell them why you're special, create a vision for them of why you're perfect for them. It won't be the right fit for every inn out there. But you only need to find one perfect inn for yourself.
You can do that.
If you're interested in doing innsitting, look to the inns that are for sale. They are staying on the market far too long these days and the folks selling them are generally ready for a rest already when they decide to sell. They often need transitional help - or just a good long break. Don't wait for them to come to you or to advertise; look for them. That will not only give you income while you look for the longer term job you want, it will diversify your experience. Let other innsitters know you're available. Remember that as innkeepers themselves, they tend to be both gracious and generous. They'll refer folks your way if they can, generally speaking.
Make a plan for which area of the country you really, really want to end up in. Learn everything you can about the inns there. Make sure all of the owners of all of the inns know you and know that you want to live and work there. It won't take long for you to get someone willing to give you a try and once you have that first shot into an area, you'll find the job of your dreams.
You can do this, seashanty. There's an owner out there just praying to find someone exactly like you.
.
Amen - you are spot on on so many points! Keep up the good posts! I, personally, have also had good luck with offering my Inn-sitting services to those Inn owners looking for permanent help. It is very hard for these owners to find the right Innkeepers for their place - it has to be a good fit for everyone involved. I tell them to take their time and I can fill in until they find that perfect person.
.
Thanks and backatcha!
 
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