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What is your deciding factor for turning on the air conditioning?

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The Farmers Daughter

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Here it is when it gets over 75 degrees without humidity. This may sound odd, but the reason I ask is I have had many guests check in and say "OMG it so hot in here - don't you have Air Conditioning? Is 75 too high? should it be lower? I'm curious because this is set by upper managment (aka - the powers that be), so to change it will involve a meeting with facts, figures and industry trends (on my part). Just not sure if its worth the battle. So what is your criteria?
 

hawley

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I have ceiling fans in most rooms, so we set our ac at 76, but if guests want it lower, it can go down. Each room has separate furnace and ac. But when it is 100 out and humidity in the 70-90's that feels real good.
If you are up and working, not sitting around or sleeping, it doesn't feel as cool.
Edited to add that we keep our own at 78. It helps take the humidity out and we run a couple of fans, ceiling fans.
 

wendydk

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I turn on the window units when inside temp hits 75 degrees. I try to keep temp 73 -74. Guests can adjust how they like in their own rooms.
 

Tim_Toad_HLB

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A/C is expected unless you are located at the North Pole and all the rationales on our part go in one ear and out the other. that is unless the guest is a true conservationist and "gets it" about lowering our carbon footprint with small measures even while on vacation.
Thankfully, many of our guests fit into that category.
Our place has 18" solid brick walls with outstanding insulation power. We put A/C units in all the rooms as soon as we get multiple 90 degree days in a row which is this week. We also have ceiling fans in all the rooms.
Our humidity is in the 20% range and the minute the sun goes down we see a 25-40 degree drop within a few hours EVERY night of the year.
As I write this it is already 89 outside and 73 at my desk with no A/C running yet today. We have a full house tonight and tomorrow and I can almost guarantee that nearly everyone will run the A/C whether they "really" need it or are even slightly warm.
We'll sit and listen to them at the breakfast table go on and on about their $500 monthly electric bills, blah....blah...blah.... but they'll check into their room here at 3:01pm flick on every light and leave them on even when leaving for hours and hours, crank the A/C to 68 and never make even the slightest mental connection.
 

Morticia

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We don't have central air so the guests regulate their own A/C needs in their rooms. We do have one wall unit for the dining room (it faces south) and we will turn that on if it's 'too' hot in the afternoon (or morning if it didn't cool down overnight).
Right now it is 74 in the dining room and all the windows are open. There's a great breeze blowing thru and I'll be damned if I'm turning on the A/C. If a guest thinks it's too hot, well, they can wait a couple of hours when it'll be back down to 50. This is the first warm weather we've had since May and I'm enjoying it!
I'll probably go open the windows in the guest rooms now that you've reminded me. Get that nice breeze blowing thru the rooms, so no one turns the A/C on!
Because we run this place ourselves and don't have corporate dictates, we turn the A/C on when we feel it's too hot. If we're baking, we know the guests will be, too.
There is no way you will please everyone, no matter what you do.
 

EmptyNest

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I'll be the smart alec and say "when I am hot!"
GIven the fact that you seem to have no control over the temp...it is what it is. We keep our place at 76. We had a separate unit for the guest area and it was up to them to fight it out. We usually tried to keep it at about 73-74 but every once in a while you had someone crank it to 68!!! What are they thinking???? We turned it up.
 

Proud Texan

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When I saw this post, I had to laugh. We have no choice BUT to turn on the air conditioning.
It gets so hot here that people quite literally die without air conditioning. We have the added advantage of living in East Texas where the humidity is always 85% or more, so the heat index sometimes gets our temperatures up to 115.
We thought about closing during July and August, but the guest keep coming.
 

Tim_Toad_HLB

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When I saw this post, I had to laugh. We have no choice BUT to turn on the air conditioning.
It gets so hot here that people quite literally die without air conditioning. We have the added advantage of living in East Texas where the humidity is always 85% or more, so the heat index sometimes gets our temperatures up to 115.
We thought about closing during July and August, but the guest keep coming..
Proud Texan said:
When I saw this post, I had to laugh. We have no choice BUT to turn on the air conditioning.
It gets so hot here that people quite literally die without air conditioning. We have the added advantage of living in East Texas where the humidity is always 85% or more, so the heat index sometimes gets our temperatures up to 115.
We thought about closing during July and August, but the guest keep coming.
I hear ya. When was that summer a few years ago when like 500 people in Chicago died during one extended hot, humid spell?
I don't miss that stuff in the slightest, but watching my Cubs battle today with their archrivals the Cardinals on a nice 76 degree day by the lakefront does bring back some fun memories.
Your fellow Texans make up anywhere from 30-45% of our annual guests and the stories we hear about that gosh darn heat and humidity are just horrible. I can take hot stuff, but you throw in any degree of humidity above 50% and its just uncomfortable.
 

JBloggs

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It is on when it is hot.
Mid 70's it doesn't even come on til it reaches like 74 degrees. Issue is the afternoon beats down and THEN even with 75 outside the upstairs from the attic down gets warmer.
 

Tim_Toad_HLB

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It is on when it is hot.
Mid 70's it doesn't even come on til it reaches like 74 degrees. Issue is the afternoon beats down and THEN even with 75 outside the upstairs from the attic down gets warmer..
Joe Bloggs said:
It is on when it is hot.
Mid 70's it doesn't even come on til it reaches like 74 degrees. Issue is the afternoon beats down and THEN even with 75 outside the upstairs from the attic down gets warmer.
On a related topic, what kind of roof or attic mounted ventilation measures do folks utilize to minimize that afternoon heat buildup?
Our roof isn't pitched quite enough except in one section for those gable end, themostat controlled ventilation fans, so we rely on the old wind powered turbine vents. Its pretty wide open here, so we're rarely without at least some breeze to get them spinning. In the winter, we cover them with an oil cloth type slipcover.
 

Proud Texan

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It is on when it is hot.
Mid 70's it doesn't even come on til it reaches like 74 degrees. Issue is the afternoon beats down and THEN even with 75 outside the upstairs from the attic down gets warmer..
Joe Bloggs said:
It is on when it is hot.
Mid 70's it doesn't even come on til it reaches like 74 degrees. Issue is the afternoon beats down and THEN even with 75 outside the upstairs from the attic down gets warmer.
On a related topic, what kind of roof or attic mounted ventilation measures do folks utilize to minimize that afternoon heat buildup?
Our roof isn't pitched quite enough except in one section for those gable end, themostat controlled ventilation fans, so we rely on the old wind powered turbine vents. Its pretty wide open here, so we're rarely without at least some breeze to get them spinning. In the winter, we cover them with an oil cloth type slipcover.
.
Right now we have a ridge vent with numerous soffit vents. We're looking at some solar-powered attic vents though.
 

Morticia

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It is on when it is hot.
Mid 70's it doesn't even come on til it reaches like 74 degrees. Issue is the afternoon beats down and THEN even with 75 outside the upstairs from the attic down gets warmer..
Joe Bloggs said:
It is on when it is hot.
Mid 70's it doesn't even come on til it reaches like 74 degrees. Issue is the afternoon beats down and THEN even with 75 outside the upstairs from the attic down gets warmer.
On a related topic, what kind of roof or attic mounted ventilation measures do folks utilize to minimize that afternoon heat buildup?
Our roof isn't pitched quite enough except in one section for those gable end, themostat controlled ventilation fans, so we rely on the old wind powered turbine vents. Its pretty wide open here, so we're rarely without at least some breeze to get them spinning. In the winter, we cover them with an oil cloth type slipcover.
.
We open the attic windows, opposite ends of the attic, to keep the air moving thru. If it's a particularly hot summer I'll put a fan in the attic and run it 24x7.
 

Copperhead

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I would find 75 quite comfortable. We are like P TX - there is no question - our A/C is on!! The issue is just how cold to keep it. Some like it like a meat locker while others a steam oven... We do have individual units in each room. When I expect a check-in I turn it on to 74, with temps in the mid 90's with extreme humidity, 74 should fill comfortable.
Oh but then just this last weekend, couple checks in - 1st thing goes to to the unit and turns it down as far as possible. (NOTE - we do have central air/heat but have these units so everyone can control their own.) This couple happens to be in the room with one of our central controls - it is locked, and has a note on it to do not touch, this affects other guest rooms - request assistance from innkeeper. The next morning 2 other guests were talking about how cold they got in the night and had to turn off their units... We were puzzled as the outdoor temps do not give us much relief at night (75 or so). When cleaning the other rooms they were cold, air off??? Hummm - I go in above mentioned's room They had somehow broken into the control box set the central air on 65, AND had their individual unit on too...
Boy I am glad I found it then. DH went in and srewed the
box to the wall. They never mentioned a thing... They knew better....
Yes they are from a town about 3 hours from here so they should be use to it. Boy I would hate to see their power bill if they run their AC like that.
 

Morticia

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I would find 75 quite comfortable. We are like P TX - there is no question - our A/C is on!! The issue is just how cold to keep it. Some like it like a meat locker while others a steam oven... We do have individual units in each room. When I expect a check-in I turn it on to 74, with temps in the mid 90's with extreme humidity, 74 should fill comfortable.
Oh but then just this last weekend, couple checks in - 1st thing goes to to the unit and turns it down as far as possible. (NOTE - we do have central air/heat but have these units so everyone can control their own.) This couple happens to be in the room with one of our central controls - it is locked, and has a note on it to do not touch, this affects other guest rooms - request assistance from innkeeper. The next morning 2 other guests were talking about how cold they got in the night and had to turn off their units... We were puzzled as the outdoor temps do not give us much relief at night (75 or so). When cleaning the other rooms they were cold, air off??? Hummm - I go in above mentioned's room They had somehow broken into the control box set the central air on 65, AND had their individual unit on too...
Boy I am glad I found it then. DH went in and srewed the
box to the wall. They never mentioned a thing... They knew better....
Yes they are from a town about 3 hours from here so they should be use to it. Boy I would hate to see their power bill if they run their AC like that..
Opposite end of the spectrum, but same overall problem. My daughter (really hubs's daughter) came home to live with us one year. The first time she and I had ever lived together. We gave her a room with a little gas fireplace (huge room, she was used to an apt) and let her control her heat. BIG, HUGE, GINORMOUS mistake. She had her dogs with her and one day they were barking up a storm. I went into the room to see what was wrong. Still do not know what was wrong with the dogs, but the room was up to 80 degrees. Dead of winter in VT, well below zero outside temp. I am muddling along at 68 degrees in SOME of the house (60 in others) and she is sweltering in 80 degrees and she is not home all day!
Hubs went thru the roof. We told her she HAD to turn the heat down when she left for the day.
So, what do I see on FB this year? Daughter has moved back to VT and posts, 'Hey, anyone else have a $500 electric bill this month?' I laughed right out loud and posted to her FB page, 'TURN THE HEAT DOWN!' She called me and asked if I could 'unfriend her'? We had a good laugh.
But she hasn't changed at all. She wants to be hot all day. They turn the heat DOWN to 68 at night. Oy.
 

Sanctuary

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When no one's here, I turn on the AC around April/May and turn it off around mid December if I'm lucky. I have some regulars from New Jersey who visit several times during the winter and even when it's 50 degrees outside at night during a cold spell, they want AC. Fortunately, all of the staterooms are individually controlled so if they want AC in the winter, they can have it, and I can open my portlights and hatches to enjoy the ocean breeze.
Now, when I run AC throughout the yacht, meaning the common areas, (such as now), it's COLD in here (as in it might not even be 70 degrees in here). I don't pay for electricity, and I hate to mess with 30 year old air conditioning that's still running like a champ, so when I turn it on, I leave it on. Two of my three systems are still the original equipment. It's the new one that gives me all the headaches...they just don't make stuff like they used to.
We don't have heat...and I just love winter here (Miami)! It's my favorite season.
 

gillumhouse

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This old houwe is usually 10 degress cooler than the outside but the upstairs does get stuffy. If I have in-coming, I turn the A/C on low cool (old unites that do not have temp settings) in that room. We have central downstairs and may run one or 2 cycles to clear humidity - mostly on a rainy day like today - but rarely need it otherwise. We have individual units for each room to control their climate.
Bree, it must be a young girl thing w/heat in winter. We had 2 student teachers our first year and I swear they must have had their baseboard heaters set to 80 or 90 so they could be in their rooms in shorts & Ts in winter. I had an electric bill of over $300 for that 2 months (back in 1997) for basically their 2 rooms and the bathroom and our part of the house is gas heat!
 

Innkeep

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This old houwe is usually 10 degress cooler than the outside but the upstairs does get stuffy. If I have in-coming, I turn the A/C on low cool (old unites that do not have temp settings) in that room. We have central downstairs and may run one or 2 cycles to clear humidity - mostly on a rainy day like today - but rarely need it otherwise. We have individual units for each room to control their climate.
Bree, it must be a young girl thing w/heat in winter. We had 2 student teachers our first year and I swear they must have had their baseboard heaters set to 80 or 90 so they could be in their rooms in shorts & Ts in winter. I had an electric bill of over $300 for that 2 months (back in 1997) for basically their 2 rooms and the bathroom and our part of the house is gas heat!.
The electric company has become very aggressive about cutting trees near power lines. When my family moved here in 1960 we planted lots of sugar maples. I can remember "helping" our handy man plant the trees. We paced off the right of way and planted the saplings. In the intervening 50 years the street went from 2 lanes to 4 lanes and a high voltage line carrying juice across town was installed. The trees grew tall and full enough that not much grass grows in the front yard.
We have had two severe ice storms in the past 20 years causing power outages lasting days and days, hence the more aggressive stance of the power company. So, this spring the power company's "forester" stopped by to tell me that they woud be cutting down all 5 of the maples along the street. Because of the high voltage line, they are allowed to cut 15 feet beyond where the lines run. That certainly wasn't a consideration 50 years ago.
I cried. I guess that shocked him, so he promised that they would try to prune the trees in front of the house, (like they had been doing in the past), and I agreed that they could cut down the trees in the side yard, which had been so pruned in the past that there wouldn't be much left afterwards). So, when the tree surgeons came, I had to fight to keep the ones in the front yard. They ended up taking one of the three and pruning two. So. I had the remains of two trees out of 5, and thought I had seen the last of them. 2 days later, the big orange trucks came back. Their supervisor wasn't happy with their work, so they proceeded to take another tree and leave me with 1/2 of a tree.
The power company offered to pay me $100 per tree, but I declined, because I thought that would make me complicit in the whole affair. I put in two replacement trees at $300 each (I wanted trees a little more mature than saplings so I might actually see them get big before I die). Its like losing old friends. The newspaper interviewed me, and, after the fact, a local group has formed to fight the power company. I guess the problem is that in some cases the pruners go farther than the easement and don't get permission. Apparently they can add what they estimate as 5 years growth after pruning to the amount they take, so that's why they came back the second time.
I really can't see that I have any legal leg to stand on, because of that 15 foot rule, but pictures of my property are being used by this "fight the utilities" group. To add insult to injury, my power was out for over an hour the weekend after I lost my trees!
The reason I'm replying to the air conditioning thread is because now that the trees are gone, it's been almost impossible to keep the upstairs cool. My electric bill that reflected only one week of no trees was $50 higher and the a/c units ran 24hrs/day with temps in the front of the house never getting below 75! Guess I'll have to look into an attic fan.
 

Morticia

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This old houwe is usually 10 degress cooler than the outside but the upstairs does get stuffy. If I have in-coming, I turn the A/C on low cool (old unites that do not have temp settings) in that room. We have central downstairs and may run one or 2 cycles to clear humidity - mostly on a rainy day like today - but rarely need it otherwise. We have individual units for each room to control their climate.
Bree, it must be a young girl thing w/heat in winter. We had 2 student teachers our first year and I swear they must have had their baseboard heaters set to 80 or 90 so they could be in their rooms in shorts & Ts in winter. I had an electric bill of over $300 for that 2 months (back in 1997) for basically their 2 rooms and the bathroom and our part of the house is gas heat!.
The electric company has become very aggressive about cutting trees near power lines. When my family moved here in 1960 we planted lots of sugar maples. I can remember "helping" our handy man plant the trees. We paced off the right of way and planted the saplings. In the intervening 50 years the street went from 2 lanes to 4 lanes and a high voltage line carrying juice across town was installed. The trees grew tall and full enough that not much grass grows in the front yard.
We have had two severe ice storms in the past 20 years causing power outages lasting days and days, hence the more aggressive stance of the power company. So, this spring the power company's "forester" stopped by to tell me that they woud be cutting down all 5 of the maples along the street. Because of the high voltage line, they are allowed to cut 15 feet beyond where the lines run. That certainly wasn't a consideration 50 years ago.
I cried. I guess that shocked him, so he promised that they would try to prune the trees in front of the house, (like they had been doing in the past), and I agreed that they could cut down the trees in the side yard, which had been so pruned in the past that there wouldn't be much left afterwards). So, when the tree surgeons came, I had to fight to keep the ones in the front yard. They ended up taking one of the three and pruning two. So. I had the remains of two trees out of 5, and thought I had seen the last of them. 2 days later, the big orange trucks came back. Their supervisor wasn't happy with their work, so they proceeded to take another tree and leave me with 1/2 of a tree.
The power company offered to pay me $100 per tree, but I declined, because I thought that would make me complicit in the whole affair. I put in two replacement trees at $300 each (I wanted trees a little more mature than saplings so I might actually see them get big before I die). Its like losing old friends. The newspaper interviewed me, and, after the fact, a local group has formed to fight the power company. I guess the problem is that in some cases the pruners go farther than the easement and don't get permission. Apparently they can add what they estimate as 5 years growth after pruning to the amount they take, so that's why they came back the second time.
I really can't see that I have any legal leg to stand on, because of that 15 foot rule, but pictures of my property are being used by this "fight the utilities" group. To add insult to injury, my power was out for over an hour the weekend after I lost my trees!
The reason I'm replying to the air conditioning thread is because now that the trees are gone, it's been almost impossible to keep the upstairs cool. My electric bill that reflected only one week of no trees was $50 higher and the a/c units ran 24hrs/day with temps in the front of the house never getting below 75! Guess I'll have to look into an attic fan.
.
Mature maple trees can be valued by an insurance company at over $20,000 just for the aesthetics. Each. We have an ash tree I do not like. We call it by its Latin name: Gutterus Plugerus. But it shades the house very nicely so it stays put.
I feel sorry for you and the loss of your trees. Especially trees you planted and watched grow and then to be lied to and insulted to boot. It's awful.
 

JBloggs

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This old houwe is usually 10 degress cooler than the outside but the upstairs does get stuffy. If I have in-coming, I turn the A/C on low cool (old unites that do not have temp settings) in that room. We have central downstairs and may run one or 2 cycles to clear humidity - mostly on a rainy day like today - but rarely need it otherwise. We have individual units for each room to control their climate.
Bree, it must be a young girl thing w/heat in winter. We had 2 student teachers our first year and I swear they must have had their baseboard heaters set to 80 or 90 so they could be in their rooms in shorts & Ts in winter. I had an electric bill of over $300 for that 2 months (back in 1997) for basically their 2 rooms and the bathroom and our part of the house is gas heat!.
The electric company has become very aggressive about cutting trees near power lines. When my family moved here in 1960 we planted lots of sugar maples. I can remember "helping" our handy man plant the trees. We paced off the right of way and planted the saplings. In the intervening 50 years the street went from 2 lanes to 4 lanes and a high voltage line carrying juice across town was installed. The trees grew tall and full enough that not much grass grows in the front yard.
We have had two severe ice storms in the past 20 years causing power outages lasting days and days, hence the more aggressive stance of the power company. So, this spring the power company's "forester" stopped by to tell me that they woud be cutting down all 5 of the maples along the street. Because of the high voltage line, they are allowed to cut 15 feet beyond where the lines run. That certainly wasn't a consideration 50 years ago.
I cried. I guess that shocked him, so he promised that they would try to prune the trees in front of the house, (like they had been doing in the past), and I agreed that they could cut down the trees in the side yard, which had been so pruned in the past that there wouldn't be much left afterwards). So, when the tree surgeons came, I had to fight to keep the ones in the front yard. They ended up taking one of the three and pruning two. So. I had the remains of two trees out of 5, and thought I had seen the last of them. 2 days later, the big orange trucks came back. Their supervisor wasn't happy with their work, so they proceeded to take another tree and leave me with 1/2 of a tree.
The power company offered to pay me $100 per tree, but I declined, because I thought that would make me complicit in the whole affair. I put in two replacement trees at $300 each (I wanted trees a little more mature than saplings so I might actually see them get big before I die). Its like losing old friends. The newspaper interviewed me, and, after the fact, a local group has formed to fight the power company. I guess the problem is that in some cases the pruners go farther than the easement and don't get permission. Apparently they can add what they estimate as 5 years growth after pruning to the amount they take, so that's why they came back the second time.
I really can't see that I have any legal leg to stand on, because of that 15 foot rule, but pictures of my property are being used by this "fight the utilities" group. To add insult to injury, my power was out for over an hour the weekend after I lost my trees!
The reason I'm replying to the air conditioning thread is because now that the trees are gone, it's been almost impossible to keep the upstairs cool. My electric bill that reflected only one week of no trees was $50 higher and the a/c units ran 24hrs/day with temps in the front of the house never getting below 75! Guess I'll have to look into an attic fan.
.
Mature maple trees can be valued by an insurance company at over $20,000 just for the aesthetics. Each. We have an ash tree I do not like. We call it by its Latin name: Gutterus Plugerus. But it shades the house very nicely so it stays put.
I feel sorry for you and the loss of your trees. Especially trees you planted and watched grow and then to be lied to and insulted to boot. It's awful.
.
Bree said:
Mature maple trees can be valued by an insurance company at over $20,000 just for the aesthetics. Each. We have an ash tree I do not like. We call it by its Latin name: Gutterus Plugerus. But it shades the house very nicely so it stays put.
I feel sorry for you and the loss of your trees. Especially trees you planted and watched grow and then to be lied to and insulted to boot. It's awful.
Tell me more about mature maples?
What do you mean an insurance company, replacement value if they are destroyed? Tell me what this means, since we have mature trees, I am curious. I have never heard any of that before.
 

Morticia

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This old houwe is usually 10 degress cooler than the outside but the upstairs does get stuffy. If I have in-coming, I turn the A/C on low cool (old unites that do not have temp settings) in that room. We have central downstairs and may run one or 2 cycles to clear humidity - mostly on a rainy day like today - but rarely need it otherwise. We have individual units for each room to control their climate.
Bree, it must be a young girl thing w/heat in winter. We had 2 student teachers our first year and I swear they must have had their baseboard heaters set to 80 or 90 so they could be in their rooms in shorts & Ts in winter. I had an electric bill of over $300 for that 2 months (back in 1997) for basically their 2 rooms and the bathroom and our part of the house is gas heat!.
The electric company has become very aggressive about cutting trees near power lines. When my family moved here in 1960 we planted lots of sugar maples. I can remember "helping" our handy man plant the trees. We paced off the right of way and planted the saplings. In the intervening 50 years the street went from 2 lanes to 4 lanes and a high voltage line carrying juice across town was installed. The trees grew tall and full enough that not much grass grows in the front yard.
We have had two severe ice storms in the past 20 years causing power outages lasting days and days, hence the more aggressive stance of the power company. So, this spring the power company's "forester" stopped by to tell me that they woud be cutting down all 5 of the maples along the street. Because of the high voltage line, they are allowed to cut 15 feet beyond where the lines run. That certainly wasn't a consideration 50 years ago.
I cried. I guess that shocked him, so he promised that they would try to prune the trees in front of the house, (like they had been doing in the past), and I agreed that they could cut down the trees in the side yard, which had been so pruned in the past that there wouldn't be much left afterwards). So, when the tree surgeons came, I had to fight to keep the ones in the front yard. They ended up taking one of the three and pruning two. So. I had the remains of two trees out of 5, and thought I had seen the last of them. 2 days later, the big orange trucks came back. Their supervisor wasn't happy with their work, so they proceeded to take another tree and leave me with 1/2 of a tree.
The power company offered to pay me $100 per tree, but I declined, because I thought that would make me complicit in the whole affair. I put in two replacement trees at $300 each (I wanted trees a little more mature than saplings so I might actually see them get big before I die). Its like losing old friends. The newspaper interviewed me, and, after the fact, a local group has formed to fight the power company. I guess the problem is that in some cases the pruners go farther than the easement and don't get permission. Apparently they can add what they estimate as 5 years growth after pruning to the amount they take, so that's why they came back the second time.
I really can't see that I have any legal leg to stand on, because of that 15 foot rule, but pictures of my property are being used by this "fight the utilities" group. To add insult to injury, my power was out for over an hour the weekend after I lost my trees!
The reason I'm replying to the air conditioning thread is because now that the trees are gone, it's been almost impossible to keep the upstairs cool. My electric bill that reflected only one week of no trees was $50 higher and the a/c units ran 24hrs/day with temps in the front of the house never getting below 75! Guess I'll have to look into an attic fan.
.
Mature maple trees can be valued by an insurance company at over $20,000 just for the aesthetics. Each. We have an ash tree I do not like. We call it by its Latin name: Gutterus Plugerus. But it shades the house very nicely so it stays put.
I feel sorry for you and the loss of your trees. Especially trees you planted and watched grow and then to be lied to and insulted to boot. It's awful.
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Bree said:
Mature maple trees can be valued by an insurance company at over $20,000 just for the aesthetics. Each. We have an ash tree I do not like. We call it by its Latin name: Gutterus Plugerus. But it shades the house very nicely so it stays put.
I feel sorry for you and the loss of your trees. Especially trees you planted and watched grow and then to be lied to and insulted to boot. It's awful.
Tell me more about mature maples?
What do you mean an insurance company, replacement value if they are destroyed? Tell me what this means, since we have mature trees, I am curious. I have never heard any of that before.
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Joe Bloggs said:
Bree said:
Mature maple trees can be valued by an insurance company at over $20,000 just for the aesthetics. Each. We have an ash tree I do not like. We call it by its Latin name: Gutterus Plugerus. But it shades the house very nicely so it stays put.
I feel sorry for you and the loss of your trees. Especially trees you planted and watched grow and then to be lied to and insulted to boot. It's awful.
Tell me more about mature maples?
What do you mean an insurance company, replacement value if they are destroyed? Tell me what this means, since we have mature trees, I am curious. I have never heard any of that before.
Friends of ours had to have a huge, very old (hundred+ years) tree removed due to rot. The insurance valued the tree at $20,000. Not sure where it goes from here, if they can collect to have it replaced or what. They had to pay to have it taken down, tho, the ins wouldn't touch that.
 
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