ADA-Service Dogs

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Proud Texan

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We are a "no pets" facility. Our reasons are (1) The safety of the pet. We are in a wild area and small pets are subject to becoming someone's dinner. (2) Some guests have severe allergies to pet dander (3) I hate to clean up after someone elses animal.
We are now by law compelled to take a guest who is bringing a service dog. I'm a little miffed because I feel like we are being forced to do something we wouldn't do otherwise. My concern is cleanliness of the room after the dog has left and the animal actually being in my home (which I would never allow otherwise). I would never allow a personal pet in an area where food is being prepared or served.
I know some of you allow pets and for those who don't, I know some have had to deal with a service animal. Am I over reacting? Have you had any problems after the fact with guests having allergic reactions to animals that have come and gone?
And, before you lecture me about the necessity of service pets, there are hotels and B&Bs in the area that accept animals. Why do they have to come here?
 

Joey Camb

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If it is of any comfort people who have service animals are a tiny minority and they usually try and get into places that take dog anyway as their first choice so the chances of you actually being faced with this are slim. ie I have been in the hotel trade 20 years only have had to accommodate a service dog once and that was when I was working at a dog friendly hotel anyway.
We also make sure that we have a list of dog friendly places ready should anyone ring it helps my friends who take dogs as it saves them commission and means I don't have to worry about it. I would sell it in this situation as we would take you if we have to but if you go to one of these places they will welcome you with open arms plus you may not have any avaliability for when they want anyway.
 

toddburme

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Yep it is a bummer but you don't want to get a lawyer and be the test case so just accept it. We were told to think of it as a medical device. You would not reject someone with glasses, or a prescribed medication. So you can't reject someone with a service animal.
 

scrambled_eggs

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Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit.
 

Proud Texan

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Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit..
Barry_Manilow said:
Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit.
By law, you just have to take their word for it. This one is apparently licensed, trained, etc. etc. ......we'll see.
 

Generic

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How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border.
 

Madeleine

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My guess is they are coming to you because they liked what they saw on your website vs the other places. (Score one for you.) We have had relatively few problems even with pet dogs and service dogs are much better trained. You won't need to worry about them becoming dinner for some of your wild animals unless the human would also be in danger, the dog will not be let out on its own.
You do have rights. You have the right to refuse service or to ask them to leave if the service dog is threatening to you or other guests (snarling, growling, barking, lunging) or if the dog is not under control (running all over inside, messing in the building).
All the service dogs I ever came in contact with while working with the deaf are better behaved than most guests. If the dog has its harness on it is working, so stay away from it at those times. If the dog is out of the harness (guests relaxing on the porch) the dog will then behave more like a pet and will accept attention.
If you have problems in your area with fleas, ticks or other pet-related bugs, let the guests know so they can prep the dog in advance.
 

Proud Texan

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How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border..
Eric Arthur Blair said:
How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border.
Called ADA. We're screwed. We have to comply.
 

Madeleine

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How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border..
Eric Arthur Blair said:
How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border.
Called ADA. We're screwed. We have to comply.
.
If you go about it that way, the guests will feel unwelcome which is not your usual style.
My experience with calls for service animals have all resulted in later cancellations. Maybe you dodged a bullet. Maybe someone was looking for a reason to sue and you didn't give it to them. There are lawyers who do this, and only this, for a lucrative living.
If that was not the case, enjoy the guests the way you always do. I have a hard time imaging any other guests recoiling at the idea you allowed a service animal onto your property. Many people look at it in a positive light.
So, you do a little extra vacuuming and some extra loads of laundry. It's not the end of the world. Better a well-behaved dog than an idjit who 'explodes' on the side of the building. At least you can show the guests where you would prefer the dog went. Even though most guests with dogs of any kind do travel with pooper scooper bags, you might want to have a few on hand just in case and a location where you would like them thrown after use. (If this is not 'usual' in your area, you can insist on it anyway.)
 

Madeleine

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So, what service does the dog provide anyway? (You are allowed to ask that. Not what the guest's need is, but what service does the dog provide.) I ask because you may need to be more concerned with what the guest will need than having a dog on the premises.
 

egoodell

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You have to take them no matter what. But if it is a TRUE service dog, rest assured that it will be impeccibly trained, and clean (no fleas etc.). You will not even hear a peep or realize that it's there under the dining room table.
If they are scamming you it could be anything and untrained.
Unfortunately we are not allowed to require any proof.
RIki
 

Sunshine

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Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit..
Barry_Manilow said:
Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit.
By law, you just have to take their word for it. This one is apparently licensed, trained, etc. etc. ......we'll see.
.
airlines make you bring your service dog early, and they make you give the dog commands and watch the animal. They also watch how it behaves when people are around to determine if it really is a service dog.
Oh and they do ask to see the 'service card' that is issued. I brought my service dog on the air plane with me 8 years ago and they did all this to me!
 

Madeleine

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Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit..
Barry_Manilow said:
Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit.
By law, you just have to take their word for it. This one is apparently licensed, trained, etc. etc. ......we'll see.
.
airlines make you bring your service dog early, and they make you give the dog commands and watch the animal. They also watch how it behaves when people are around to determine if it really is a service dog.
Oh and they do ask to see the 'service card' that is issued. I brought my service dog on the air plane with me 8 years ago and they did all this to me!
.
It is a little harder to ask you to leave at 30,000 feet if the dog isn't trained!
 

Sunshine

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Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit..
Barry_Manilow said:
Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit.
By law, you just have to take their word for it. This one is apparently licensed, trained, etc. etc. ......we'll see.
.
airlines make you bring your service dog early, and they make you give the dog commands and watch the animal. They also watch how it behaves when people are around to determine if it really is a service dog.
Oh and they do ask to see the 'service card' that is issued. I brought my service dog on the air plane with me 8 years ago and they did all this to me!
.
It is a little harder to ask you to leave at 30,000 feet if the dog isn't trained!
.
LOL!
No one (passengers) even knew she was on the plane until she got up, turned around, stretched, and went back and laid down. people were like "oh wow, theres a dog on the plane". That is the way it should be with service animals.
 

Generic

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How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border..
Eric Arthur Blair said:
How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border.
Called ADA. We're screwed. We have to comply.
.
Well, then treat them well. These dogs are usually extremely well behaved. And if you are like me, enjoy taking antihistimines for the duration of their stay and a day or two afterward. I find that taking the 24 hour kind before bed works best, because it beats any drowsy feelings you may have by being during your sleep period in any case.
I think there is an exception if you are considered residential and 5 rooms and under, but otherwise you are stuck.
My favourite sign at a local store says "No Aminals Except Service Dogs" because if the blind man can't read the sign, the service dog ain't going to be helping him read it.
 

Proud Texan

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How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border..
Eric Arthur Blair said:
How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border.
Called ADA. We're screwed. We have to comply.
.
Well, then treat them well. These dogs are usually extremely well behaved. And if you are like me, enjoy taking antihistimines for the duration of their stay and a day or two afterward. I find that taking the 24 hour kind before bed works best, because it beats any drowsy feelings you may have by being during your sleep period in any case.
I think there is an exception if you are considered residential and 5 rooms and under, but otherwise you are stuck.
My favourite sign at a local store says "No Aminals Except Service Dogs" because if the blind man can't read the sign, the service dog ain't going to be helping him read it.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
Well, then treat them well. These dogs are usually extremely well behaved. And if you are like me, enjoy taking antihistimines for the duration of their stay and a day or two afterward. I find that taking the 24 hour kind before bed works best, because it beats any drowsy feelings you may have by being during your sleep period in any case.
I think there is an exception if you are considered residential and 5 rooms and under, but otherwise you are stuck.
My favourite sign at a local store says "No Aminals Except Service Dogs" because if the blind man can't read the sign, the service dog ain't going to be helping him read it.
The ADA Guidelines changed in 2011. There is NO EXCEPTION.
 

Madeleine

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Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit..
Barry_Manilow said:
Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit.
By law, you just have to take their word for it. This one is apparently licensed, trained, etc. etc. ......we'll see.
.
airlines make you bring your service dog early, and they make you give the dog commands and watch the animal. They also watch how it behaves when people are around to determine if it really is a service dog.
Oh and they do ask to see the 'service card' that is issued. I brought my service dog on the air plane with me 8 years ago and they did all this to me!
.
It is a little harder to ask you to leave at 30,000 feet if the dog isn't trained!
.
LOL!
No one (passengers) even knew she was on the plane until she got up, turned around, stretched, and went back and laid down. people were like "oh wow, theres a dog on the plane". That is the way it should be with service animals.
.
Sunshine said:
"oh wow, theres a dog on the plane". That is the way it should be with service animals.
Exactly.
 

scrambled_eggs

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How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border..
Eric Arthur Blair said:
How many rooms do you have? I know that we are exempt from the act because we are considered a residence and not a commercial establishment. I think in the US you can call 800-514-0301 with questions about the ADA and get direct answers on compliance issues.
I've had a guests ask me about ADA compliance. I have to remind them that the first A, stopped at the border.
Called ADA. We're screwed. We have to comply.
.
Well, then treat them well. These dogs are usually extremely well behaved. And if you are like me, enjoy taking antihistimines for the duration of their stay and a day or two afterward. I find that taking the 24 hour kind before bed works best, because it beats any drowsy feelings you may have by being during your sleep period in any case.
I think there is an exception if you are considered residential and 5 rooms and under, but otherwise you are stuck.
My favourite sign at a local store says "No Aminals Except Service Dogs" because if the blind man can't read the sign, the service dog ain't going to be helping him read it.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
Well, then treat them well. These dogs are usually extremely well behaved. And if you are like me, enjoy taking antihistimines for the duration of their stay and a day or two afterward. I find that taking the 24 hour kind before bed works best, because it beats any drowsy feelings you may have by being during your sleep period in any case.
I think there is an exception if you are considered residential and 5 rooms and under, but otherwise you are stuck.
My favourite sign at a local store says "No Aminals Except Service Dogs" because if the blind man can't read the sign, the service dog ain't going to be helping him read it.
The ADA Guidelines changed in 2011. There is NO EXCEPTION.
.
[/quote] The ADA Guidelines changed in 2011. There is NO EXCEPTION.
[/quote]
The guidelines did change in 2011 but it still says if you are owner occupied and 5 rooms or less you are exempt from ADA. Not sure what that really means with service animals...it is quite cloudy if you ask me.
I would love to see a well trained service animal but so far the people trying to stay with me have all been scammers. I didn't know any better at the time. I was just taken aback by these people showing up with out even mentioning it in advance. I took them and their dog which made a mess of hair in the bed and all over the room. I think something should be done about this on a national level to curtail people taking advantage of others.
 

egoodell

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Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit..
Barry_Manilow said:
Were you not required to take them before? The whole thing is very confusing and I know a lot of guests take advantage of the situation and bring animals that they say are service animals when in fact they aren't. I wish there was some sort of permit or card that guests with service animals would have to carry to prove it is legit.
By law, you just have to take their word for it. This one is apparently licensed, trained, etc. etc. ......we'll see.
.
airlines make you bring your service dog early, and they make you give the dog commands and watch the animal. They also watch how it behaves when people are around to determine if it really is a service dog.
Oh and they do ask to see the 'service card' that is issued. I brought my service dog on the air plane with me 8 years ago and they did all this to me!
.
Sunshine said:
airlines make you bring your service dog early, and they make you give the dog commands and watch the animal. They also watch how it behaves when people are around to determine if it really is a service dog.
Oh and they do ask to see the 'service card' that is issued. I brought my service dog on the air plane with me 8 years ago and they did all this to me!
Well the airlines must have some pull because we are not allowed to ask for any kind of certification. And five rooms or not, we must take them. Unless you want to spend your retirement on laywers.
Riki
 

seashanty

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I had service animals (dogs) stay at my place about 5 times. no problem whatsoever. i worried about all the issues you mentioned. we did not take pets. but they were impeccably groomed, silent and did no mess of any kind in the house. as has been said, they are amazing and, if they are true service animals, you will have no problem.
four of them i knew about in advance. the 5th was a complete surprise and the guests were hostile at checkin, waving a paper in front of me that they had a service dog and i had to take them. it would have been courteous and proper to tell me ahead of time.
but anyway ... i wondered if it was a true service animal until i watched it interact with the owner. it was a man who wore it on his person in like a baby carrier all the time. the man wore white knee high socks and sandal slippers and had serious issues communicating with people. one morning he all but broke the door down trying to get out of the room, pulled off the doorknob from inside and could not put the doorknob back on.
i was going to go in through a window (ground floor room thankfully) to open the door from inside. i stood at one of the windows trying to calm him down, telling him i would remove the huge screen so he could just step out. his wife was already over the edge dealing with whatever was going on in his mind.
in any case, he pounded and yelled and yanked on the door. shouted and stamped his feet. ran to the window and tried to keep me out! she sat in a chair and rocked. i was at the window trying to calm him down. my son was on the other side of the room door, taking off the hardware to open the door, using tools and making a lot of racket.
the little dog in his/her carrier was completely silent and unphased by the whole thing.
 
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