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Olga

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Has anyone here built an addition to their home? If so, how many rooms, bathrooms and was the cost worth it? I know each area is different, but just to get an idea. Thanks.
 

JBloggs

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Holy moly batman. You need to contact a LOCAL contractor to ask this question.
 

Olga

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Holy moly batman. You need to contact a LOCAL contractor to ask this question..
Joey Bloggs said:
Holy moly batman. You need to contact a LOCAL contractor to ask this question.
lol, I'm not at that stage ... just wondering if something like that is worth the trouble.
 

gillumhouse

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There IS no range. Each area has its own costs and it depends on what is happening or has happened as to what the construction costs will be. Pre-2006 costs were reasonable. After Katrina the cost of building supplies hit the stratosphere and has yet to return to Earth. Hurricanes, floods, tornadoes all affect prices. Boom or bust affects prices too. Are people so hard up that they do not have money for construction/remodel - then contractors are starving too but if it is boom they can charge whatever and you say yes sir and get in line. I am probably going to be getting in line for my roof now that the appraisers have screwed around with a loan that was supposed to already have closed. And I do not know if the quote I was given in December is worth squat now.
 

OnTheShore

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New residential construction, which generally would include additions, will likely cost anywhere between $100 to $300 per square foot, or more, depending on the complexity of your project, site conditions, the quality and standard to which you build, your choice of materials, and how hungry your contractors are. So a 1000-square foot addition could be $100,000 and up.
 

Madeleine

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New residential construction, which generally would include additions, will likely cost anywhere between $100 to $300 per square foot, or more, depending on the complexity of your project, site conditions, the quality and standard to which you build, your choice of materials, and how hungry your contractors are. So a 1000-square foot addition could be $100,000 and up..
I was quoted $10k to put in a sidewalk. It's outrageous. In order to do the sidewalk I have to change the materials from bricks (to match the existing sidewalks) to tar, which I don't care for, just to get the price down to where I MIGHT consider doing it.
And contractors wonder why there are so many DIYers out there.
 

Olga

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New residential construction, which generally would include additions, will likely cost anywhere between $100 to $300 per square foot, or more, depending on the complexity of your project, site conditions, the quality and standard to which you build, your choice of materials, and how hungry your contractors are. So a 1000-square foot addition could be $100,000 and up..
Harborfields said:
New residential construction, which generally would include additions, will likely cost anywhere between $100 to $300 per square foot, or more, depending on the complexity of your project, site conditions, the quality and standard to which you build, your choice of materials, and how hungry your contractors are. So a 1000-square foot addition could be $100,000 and up.
Thanks. It's nice to have a starting point while putting together information :)
 

Olga

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New residential construction, which generally would include additions, will likely cost anywhere between $100 to $300 per square foot, or more, depending on the complexity of your project, site conditions, the quality and standard to which you build, your choice of materials, and how hungry your contractors are. So a 1000-square foot addition could be $100,000 and up..
I was quoted $10k to put in a sidewalk. It's outrageous. In order to do the sidewalk I have to change the materials from bricks (to match the existing sidewalks) to tar, which I don't care for, just to get the price down to where I MIGHT consider doing it.
And contractors wonder why there are so many DIYers out there.
.
Madeleine said:
I was quoted $10k to put in a sidewalk. It's outrageous. In order to do the sidewalk I have to change the materials from bricks (to match the existing sidewalks) to tar, which I don't care for, just to get the price down to where I MIGHT consider doing it.
And contractors wonder why there are so many DIYers out there.
Wow, it's hard to believe the simpliest things are really quite complicated.
 

Innkeep

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Other things to consider with renovations of older houses is the state of plumbing and wiring. My house was built in 1946 and had fuse boxes and cast iron pipes. Because natural gas was very inexpensive at that time, the house, although well-built had virtually no insulation. So in addition to adding on for more bathroom space, wiring and plumbing had to be upgraded. The outside walls that could be reached were insulated. I ended up with a new roof for the entire house to make the addition look right.
Also look at your LOCAL regulations about the kitchen. My health department started out insisting that I have a full restaurant kitchen for a 4-room B&B. Although my attorney finally straightened him out on that, part of the "compromise" was to have a separate handwashing sink. I also had to have a mop sink around the corner from the kitchen.
My renovations ended up costing me 3-4x what I thought they would when I started out, but as the MC commercial says "keeping my sanity ... Priceless"
 

gillumhouse

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New residential construction, which generally would include additions, will likely cost anywhere between $100 to $300 per square foot, or more, depending on the complexity of your project, site conditions, the quality and standard to which you build, your choice of materials, and how hungry your contractors are. So a 1000-square foot addition could be $100,000 and up..
Harborfields said:
New residential construction, which generally would include additions, will likely cost anywhere between $100 to $300 per square foot, or more, depending on the complexity of your project, site conditions, the quality and standard to which you build, your choice of materials, and how hungry your contractors are. So a 1000-square foot addition could be $100,000 and up.
Thanks. It's nice to have a starting point while putting together information :)
.
You do not want to know how much creating a bathroom and renovating the original bathroom cost - more than twice her sidewalk estimate and what I thought was the estimate for the job was less than her sidewalk. They also had me closed for 11 weeks while they did the work.
 

Weaver

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New residential construction, which generally would include additions, will likely cost anywhere between $100 to $300 per square foot, or more, depending on the complexity of your project, site conditions, the quality and standard to which you build, your choice of materials, and how hungry your contractors are. So a 1000-square foot addition could be $100,000 and up..
Harborfields said:
New residential construction, which generally would include additions, will likely cost anywhere between $100 to $300 per square foot, or more, depending on the complexity of your project, site conditions, the quality and standard to which you build, your choice of materials, and how hungry your contractors are. So a 1000-square foot addition could be $100,000 and up.
Thanks. It's nice to have a starting point while putting together information :)
.
You do not want to know how much creating a bathroom and renovating the original bathroom cost - more than twice her sidewalk estimate and what I thought was the estimate for the job was less than her sidewalk. They also had me closed for 11 weeks while they did the work.
.
Going rate around here, depending on how old the house is, additional septic issues, etc. No change in roof line, or bearing walls, gutting and remodeling a bath, no fixture location changes is about $8-16K. Double that for adding a whole new bath. I gutted and replaced everything in my master except the clawfoot, for under $1200, but I did all the labor myself, got toilet for free, used a dry sink as the vanity cabinet with a vessel sink ($62 on sale a L owes), went with travertine tiles, and nice lighting. Still cost me almost $1200 just materials.
Baths add value, but are not cheap. The older the home the more it costs.
 

sandynn

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I think if you build outside of the footprint of the house then you have to ADA compiant with the new. It you do things inside the structure you are grandfathered.
 

gillumhouse

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I think if you build outside of the footprint of the house then you have to ADA compiant with the new. It you do things inside the structure you are grandfathered..
And here, new construction means sprinklers are required to be installed.
 

Weaver

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I think if you build outside of the footprint of the house then you have to ADA compiant with the new. It you do things inside the structure you are grandfathered..
And here, new construction means sprinklers are required to be installed.
.
Oh yes! Change the foot print, that is a whole new animal. My home is county not city, however does not meet with current set backs. I can not extend the house's foot print to one side because of side lot requirements, can not go forward or I would be in the path of the Milk truck that regularly is two tire widths into my front grass just to turn into the drive to reach the milking barn across the street. Can't expand on the driveway side unless I start the addition behind the current set back rules, which would put me so close to the carriage house you couldn't get a car in there is if was a matchbox. Unless of course I only added 4 feet then a small car might make the sharp turn. Can't go back or I will be into my huge maple tree. So I can go up or nothing.
Love old houses but not the easiest thing to deal with. The footprint is the footprint, make do within or do without.
 

gillumhouse

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I think if you build outside of the footprint of the house then you have to ADA compiant with the new. It you do things inside the structure you are grandfathered..
And here, new construction means sprinklers are required to be installed.
.
Oh yes! Change the foot print, that is a whole new animal. My home is county not city, however does not meet with current set backs. I can not extend the house's foot print to one side because of side lot requirements, can not go forward or I would be in the path of the Milk truck that regularly is two tire widths into my front grass just to turn into the drive to reach the milking barn across the street. Can't expand on the driveway side unless I start the addition behind the current set back rules, which would put me so close to the carriage house you couldn't get a car in there is if was a matchbox. Unless of course I only added 4 feet then a small car might make the sharp turn. Can't go back or I will be into my huge maple tree. So I can go up or nothing.
Love old houses but not the easiest thing to deal with. The footprint is the footprint, make do within or do without.
.
That is why my kitchen moved to the back porch and the "mud room" became the Gillum's bathroom when the dining room became the Gillum's bedroom in the 1950s and the dining room moved into the kitchen. She also had half of the front porch enclosed so she could have a place to enjoy the sun without the dust created when the post office was next door. It became a workshop for DH. I would love to make that my office - oh well. He needs the space to mat & frame his paintings.
 

Weaver

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I think if you build outside of the footprint of the house then you have to ADA compiant with the new. It you do things inside the structure you are grandfathered..
And here, new construction means sprinklers are required to be installed.
.
Oh yes! Change the foot print, that is a whole new animal. My home is county not city, however does not meet with current set backs. I can not extend the house's foot print to one side because of side lot requirements, can not go forward or I would be in the path of the Milk truck that regularly is two tire widths into my front grass just to turn into the drive to reach the milking barn across the street. Can't expand on the driveway side unless I start the addition behind the current set back rules, which would put me so close to the carriage house you couldn't get a car in there is if was a matchbox. Unless of course I only added 4 feet then a small car might make the sharp turn. Can't go back or I will be into my huge maple tree. So I can go up or nothing.
Love old houses but not the easiest thing to deal with. The footprint is the footprint, make do within or do without.
.
That is why my kitchen moved to the back porch and the "mud room" became the Gillum's bathroom when the dining room became the Gillum's bedroom in the 1950s and the dining room moved into the kitchen. She also had half of the front porch enclosed so she could have a place to enjoy the sun without the dust created when the post office was next door. It became a workshop for DH. I would love to make that my office - oh well. He needs the space to mat & frame his paintings.
.
My kitchen used to be the summer kitchen, the original kitchen is now my den, the porch became the mud room (can't fit a full size washer and dryer side by side - go figure that one), the other side porches became the downstairs bath (only one with a shower) and a 5' addition to the parlor. The other side porch which was enclosed with jalousie windows is now what we call the cat room for lack of a better term, cats hang out there, and it is the staging area for winter wood. It is so cold in the winter the cat's water will freeze, needless to say no one is hanging out in that room in the winter.
The stories this house could tell. The downstairs bath sits over the old coal shoot, the addition in the parlor has settled, the original stone and bolder foundation did not. When they took out some of the fireplaces when they converted from coal and wood heat to steam, not all the chimneys were removed all the way. Some just got cabinets built around them.
Start to remodel an old house and figure it will probably take 3 times the money and 10 times the time. Don't even get me started on how they measured things 100 years ago.
 

gillumhouse

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I think if you build outside of the footprint of the house then you have to ADA compiant with the new. It you do things inside the structure you are grandfathered..
And here, new construction means sprinklers are required to be installed.
.
Oh yes! Change the foot print, that is a whole new animal. My home is county not city, however does not meet with current set backs. I can not extend the house's foot print to one side because of side lot requirements, can not go forward or I would be in the path of the Milk truck that regularly is two tire widths into my front grass just to turn into the drive to reach the milking barn across the street. Can't expand on the driveway side unless I start the addition behind the current set back rules, which would put me so close to the carriage house you couldn't get a car in there is if was a matchbox. Unless of course I only added 4 feet then a small car might make the sharp turn. Can't go back or I will be into my huge maple tree. So I can go up or nothing.
Love old houses but not the easiest thing to deal with. The footprint is the footprint, make do within or do without.
.
That is why my kitchen moved to the back porch and the "mud room" became the Gillum's bathroom when the dining room became the Gillum's bedroom in the 1950s and the dining room moved into the kitchen. She also had half of the front porch enclosed so she could have a place to enjoy the sun without the dust created when the post office was next door. It became a workshop for DH. I would love to make that my office - oh well. He needs the space to mat & frame his paintings.
.
My kitchen used to be the summer kitchen, the original kitchen is now my den, the porch became the mud room (can't fit a full size washer and dryer side by side - go figure that one), the other side porches became the downstairs bath (only one with a shower) and a 5' addition to the parlor. The other side porch which was enclosed with jalousie windows is now what we call the cat room for lack of a better term, cats hang out there, and it is the staging area for winter wood. It is so cold in the winter the cat's water will freeze, needless to say no one is hanging out in that room in the winter.
The stories this house could tell. The downstairs bath sits over the old coal shoot, the addition in the parlor has settled, the original stone and bolder foundation did not. When they took out some of the fireplaces when they converted from coal and wood heat to steam, not all the chimneys were removed all the way. Some just got cabinets built around them.
Start to remodel an old house and figure it will probably take 3 times the money and 10 times the time. Don't even get me started on how they measured things 100 years ago.
.
We finally found the last gas line upstairs (when the deconstructors knocked the cap off of it) so none of the fireplaces function. The last time a roof was put on, one of the 3 chimneys was removed. When the new roof goes on, the other two roofs will be history - they need tuckpointing and are no longer for anything other than looks. Many of my floors are in the squeak stage. Hunting for the joists to unsqueak them will be interesting.
I got the piece of ceiling that was hanging loose off - it was ceiling paint. Put up some spackle, but decided to concede to DH. It does not look too bad right now. Will get the whole ceiling done when the roof is done. My daughter is coming in September - job list!! If her twin comes in June, it will get done earlier as my s-i-l will do it. One nice thing about having so darn many kids - free labor when they come visit and most of them are good at fixing things.
 

Weaver

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I think if you build outside of the footprint of the house then you have to ADA compiant with the new. It you do things inside the structure you are grandfathered..
And here, new construction means sprinklers are required to be installed.
.
Oh yes! Change the foot print, that is a whole new animal. My home is county not city, however does not meet with current set backs. I can not extend the house's foot print to one side because of side lot requirements, can not go forward or I would be in the path of the Milk truck that regularly is two tire widths into my front grass just to turn into the drive to reach the milking barn across the street. Can't expand on the driveway side unless I start the addition behind the current set back rules, which would put me so close to the carriage house you couldn't get a car in there is if was a matchbox. Unless of course I only added 4 feet then a small car might make the sharp turn. Can't go back or I will be into my huge maple tree. So I can go up or nothing.
Love old houses but not the easiest thing to deal with. The footprint is the footprint, make do within or do without.
.
That is why my kitchen moved to the back porch and the "mud room" became the Gillum's bathroom when the dining room became the Gillum's bedroom in the 1950s and the dining room moved into the kitchen. She also had half of the front porch enclosed so she could have a place to enjoy the sun without the dust created when the post office was next door. It became a workshop for DH. I would love to make that my office - oh well. He needs the space to mat & frame his paintings.
.
My kitchen used to be the summer kitchen, the original kitchen is now my den, the porch became the mud room (can't fit a full size washer and dryer side by side - go figure that one), the other side porches became the downstairs bath (only one with a shower) and a 5' addition to the parlor. The other side porch which was enclosed with jalousie windows is now what we call the cat room for lack of a better term, cats hang out there, and it is the staging area for winter wood. It is so cold in the winter the cat's water will freeze, needless to say no one is hanging out in that room in the winter.
The stories this house could tell. The downstairs bath sits over the old coal shoot, the addition in the parlor has settled, the original stone and bolder foundation did not. When they took out some of the fireplaces when they converted from coal and wood heat to steam, not all the chimneys were removed all the way. Some just got cabinets built around them.
Start to remodel an old house and figure it will probably take 3 times the money and 10 times the time. Don't even get me started on how they measured things 100 years ago.
.
We finally found the last gas line upstairs (when the deconstructors knocked the cap off of it) so none of the fireplaces function. The last time a roof was put on, one of the 3 chimneys was removed. When the new roof goes on, the other two roofs will be history - they need tuckpointing and are no longer for anything other than looks. Many of my floors are in the squeak stage. Hunting for the joists to unsqueak them will be interesting.
I got the piece of ceiling that was hanging loose off - it was ceiling paint. Put up some spackle, but decided to concede to DH. It does not look too bad right now. Will get the whole ceiling done when the roof is done. My daughter is coming in September - job list!! If her twin comes in June, it will get done earlier as my s-i-l will do it. One nice thing about having so darn many kids - free labor when they come visit and most of them are good at fixing things.
.
Free Labor = good!!!
I touched a little piece of ceiling once, about 2 SF landed in the clawfoot. I figured, what the heck the ceiling is coming down, why not just gut the bathroom and do it up nice.
I learned my lesson never touch a wet ceiling. Well my son learned the lesson, never let MOM touch a wet ceiling or you will be moving a cast iron tub and doing demo for two days! Gotta love teenagers, feed them well and they will do most anything.
 

Joey Camb

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I think if you build outside of the footprint of the house then you have to ADA compiant with the new. It you do things inside the structure you are grandfathered..
And here, new construction means sprinklers are required to be installed.
.
Oh yes! Change the foot print, that is a whole new animal. My home is county not city, however does not meet with current set backs. I can not extend the house's foot print to one side because of side lot requirements, can not go forward or I would be in the path of the Milk truck that regularly is two tire widths into my front grass just to turn into the drive to reach the milking barn across the street. Can't expand on the driveway side unless I start the addition behind the current set back rules, which would put me so close to the carriage house you couldn't get a car in there is if was a matchbox. Unless of course I only added 4 feet then a small car might make the sharp turn. Can't go back or I will be into my huge maple tree. So I can go up or nothing.
Love old houses but not the easiest thing to deal with. The footprint is the footprint, make do within or do without.
.
Have you thought about going down? We are in a similar suituation as we are in a terrace (this means you literally have the next house strapped onto the side of yours) so no going sideways. On the front we are in a conservation area ie no changes without extensive permissions from the council. The back we arnt messing with much as its car parking which is like gold bars around here! however in two years time if I save enough I want to build an orangery accross the back which will not loose any parking spaces but would become lounge and reception, meaning the current lounge and reception could become 2 ground floor double rooms which are very sought after (then we would have 4). We did the basement 2 years ago and made it into an owners flat gained 2 double bedrooms with ensuite then.
http://nationaltrustconservatories.co.uk/thebelton.html
what I would do though is divide it internally into 3 sections ie (1) would be a private conservatory for what will become room 13 and if I put a sofa bed in it could be used as a family suite in the warmer months. The main or middle section (2) which would be lounge/reception/entrance from the car park which would replace the really ugly 80's breeze block add on old kitchen which is an eyesoar! also this means there is a door punched in just in the right place to link it up to come in. Last but not least section (3) which would cover the light well by my bedroom giving me and DH more living space, more privacy and more sound proofing. The reason I thought of the sections to start with is because I didn't want people sat chatting in a noisy group outside room 13 which will have an external door into it where the back door is now to help with accessibility. I just had visions of people sat there chatting while people were sat in their bed wishing they would shut up! this was it makes a liability into an asset ie garden room, extra space but private and possibly a family room which is in high demand.
 

egoodell

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We did but your question is too general - I don't have the time to recount all we did. And it depends on your location so you need to ask a contractor and then put about 10$k or more above what he quotes.
I think our new wing cost us about $125K but we did all the work except for plumbing and electrric and concrete foundation.
And that is just the building. Not the bathrooms, whirlpool tubs, sinks, cultured marble showers, etc
I think we saved 50% doing the work ourselves.
That wing has two new rooms and will later have a staiway put in for another two rooms not yet finished.
And keep in mind that your room rentals will pay the bills and not a lot more unless you do something like we do with the wine tours. Which means you cannot work outside the business.
RIki
 

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