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Easter Egg painting

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bbinnsitters

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I am looking for the old fashioned egg dying - little tiny bottles that you would dip a q-tip in and decorate the recently boiled egg (so recently boiled that we had to wait for it to cool down, but that is how it worked) I don't think we could have painted cold eggs, but maybe that is just my memory and my Mother just wasn't planning ahead and always made the eggs at the last minute. With 7 kids that is entirely possible, or it was just her "job" to boil the eggs so she didn't have to paint them! Anyways, I can't find them anywhere - does anyone know if they even still make the little bottle method anymore?
 

EmptyNest

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Food coloring? Is this what you mean.
.
See that's exactly what i was thinking of...but you don't dip a q tip into these little bottles ...that would be a good trick:) IF this is what she wants...then here are directions:
[h3]Materials:[/h3]
  • hard boiled egg(s)
  • vinegar (plain white)
  • small bowls, cups or empty margarine containers
  • water
  • food color drops
[h3]Directions:[/h3]
  • fill containers about 1/2 to 2/3 full of water. Don't full TOO full or when you put the eggs in it will overflow. I like using cups because it's the most frugal *grin*
  • Add 1 tsp of vinegar (for every 1 cup - ish of water. We don't need absolute measurements here, but if you're using a gallon ice cream pail you'll need more vinegar than if you're using a teacup)
  • Add drops of food color until you're happy with the hue. (I usually get happy with the hue and then add 2 more drops... I find that tends to make the eggs the color I was originally happy with).
  • Put hard boiled eggs in the cups (I use a Tbsp to put them in and take them out)
  • Let dry. Wipe with vegetable oil (with paper towel or a rag) to make a glossier egg
NOTE: Always cover my work surface with newspaper so the dye doesn't get on my kitchen table. If it does get on furniture, wipe it off with a rag immediately. This goes for the store bought packages too.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful.
 

JBloggs

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Yes, you can do that and make a swirl and egg - we have done that. I am going to make TIE DYE on Friday, you put a few drops in a baggie then drop the eggs then another bag of a diff color drop a few drops into it.

Here is the colander method - but when there are kids involved you want to be able to do them one at a time and make the fun last.
 

JBloggs

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I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful..
Innkeeper To Go said:
I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful.
I had many items for sale here in our gift shop and still a few left that are tea or coffee dyed "Primitive" dolls etc. Muslin soaked in tea or coffee.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Yes, you can do that and make a swirl and egg - we have done that. I am going to make TIE DYE on Friday, you put a few drops in a baggie then drop the eggs then another bag of a diff color drop a few drops into it.

Here is the colander method - but when there are kids involved you want to be able to do them one at a time and make the fun last..
Gorgeous!
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful..
Innkeeper To Go said:
I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful.
I had many items for sale here in our gift shop and still a few left that are tea or coffee dyed "Primitive" dolls etc. Muslin soaked in tea or coffee.
.
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
 

JBloggs

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I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful..
Innkeeper To Go said:
I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful.
I had many items for sale here in our gift shop and still a few left that are tea or coffee dyed "Primitive" dolls etc. Muslin soaked in tea or coffee.
.
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
Yes we have done that, I forgot about those. They are marbleized eggs or something
here they are - another fun method! Reminds me of the old pickled eggs, using beet juice.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful..
Innkeeper To Go said:
I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful.
I had many items for sale here in our gift shop and still a few left that are tea or coffee dyed "Primitive" dolls etc. Muslin soaked in tea or coffee.
.
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
Yes we have done that, I forgot about those. They are marbleized eggs or something
here they are - another fun method! Reminds me of the old pickled eggs, using beet juice.
.
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
 

JBloggs

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I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful..
Innkeeper To Go said:
I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful.
I had many items for sale here in our gift shop and still a few left that are tea or coffee dyed "Primitive" dolls etc. Muslin soaked in tea or coffee.
.
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
Yes we have done that, I forgot about those. They are marbleized eggs or something
here they are - another fun method! Reminds me of the old pickled eggs, using beet juice.
.
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
*Warning* I am going to totally sidetrack this thread ...way off the charts...
In Australia the typical Oz burger has beetroot on it (also has fried egg, bacon, pineapple etc). McDonald's decided to make the McOz burger and quickly reduced the entire country's beet supply in one week. That was the only tupperware I used to own, it is a specially made container to make homemade beets. You lift the strainer up and pull the beets up out of the brine (vinegar and sugar). I need to get another one of those! When we were done with the beets I would toss the boiled eggs - after knocking them about a bit, into the brine overnight.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful..
Innkeeper To Go said:
I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful.
I had many items for sale here in our gift shop and still a few left that are tea or coffee dyed "Primitive" dolls etc. Muslin soaked in tea or coffee.
.
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
Yes we have done that, I forgot about those. They are marbleized eggs or something
here they are - another fun method! Reminds me of the old pickled eggs, using beet juice.
.
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
*Warning* I am going to totally sidetrack this thread ...way off the charts...
In Australia the typical Oz burger has beetroot on it (also has fried egg, bacon, pineapple etc). McDonald's decided to make the McOz burger and quickly reduced the entire country's beet supply in one week. That was the only tupperware I used to own, it is a specially made container to make homemade beets. You lift the strainer up and pull the beets up out of the brine (vinegar and sugar). I need to get another one of those! When we were done with the beets I would toss the boiled eggs - after knocking them about a bit, into the brine overnight.
.
I have never seen that tupperware container but I'm totally going to be on the lookout for it now.
As for the Oz burger, well, that's an interesting combo isn't it? I have become quite the fan of beets but having them on a burger is something I have never tried! Hold the egg, please.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I'll have to say that if you took away the cheese, the bacon, and egg, I'd probably go for an Oz burger.
 

gillumhouse

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I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful..
Innkeeper To Go said:
I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful.
I had many items for sale here in our gift shop and still a few left that are tea or coffee dyed "Primitive" dolls etc. Muslin soaked in tea or coffee.
.
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
Yes we have done that, I forgot about those. They are marbleized eggs or something
here they are - another fun method! Reminds me of the old pickled eggs, using beet juice.
.
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
*Warning* I am going to totally sidetrack this thread ...way off the charts...
In Australia the typical Oz burger has beetroot on it (also has fried egg, bacon, pineapple etc). McDonald's decided to make the McOz burger and quickly reduced the entire country's beet supply in one week. That was the only tupperware I used to own, it is a specially made container to make homemade beets. You lift the strainer up and pull the beets up out of the brine (vinegar and sugar). I need to get another one of those! When we were done with the beets I would toss the boiled eggs - after knocking them about a bit, into the brine overnight.
.
I LOVE pickled eggs. Two of my friends in different places made a gallon jar of pickled eggs just for me when I was coming to visit. I like them after about a week when the purple is down to the yolk but not in it yet.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful..
Innkeeper To Go said:
I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful.
I had many items for sale here in our gift shop and still a few left that are tea or coffee dyed "Primitive" dolls etc. Muslin soaked in tea or coffee.
.
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
Yes we have done that, I forgot about those. They are marbleized eggs or something
here they are - another fun method! Reminds me of the old pickled eggs, using beet juice.
.
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
*Warning* I am going to totally sidetrack this thread ...way off the charts...
In Australia the typical Oz burger has beetroot on it (also has fried egg, bacon, pineapple etc). McDonald's decided to make the McOz burger and quickly reduced the entire country's beet supply in one week. That was the only tupperware I used to own, it is a specially made container to make homemade beets. You lift the strainer up and pull the beets up out of the brine (vinegar and sugar). I need to get another one of those! When we were done with the beets I would toss the boiled eggs - after knocking them about a bit, into the brine overnight.
.
I LOVE pickled eggs. Two of my friends in different places made a gallon jar of pickled eggs just for me when I was coming to visit. I like them after about a week when the purple is down to the yolk but not in it yet.
.
Lord have mercy, it's been YEARS since I've had a pickled egg. My grandmother used to just LOVE them!
 

bbinnsitters

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Food coloring? Is this what you mean.
.
Ok, I am obviously older than the rest of you...they were glass bottles and yes, you could stick a q-tip in them. But I am beginning to wonder if maybe they just used to be in glass bottles!!! And the little plastic ones pictured (which I have, of course) are the "new and improved" - like everything else. There was no mixing with anything - just dip your q-tip in and paint on a warm egg - it would dry instantly so you could then paint with another color. My really artistic brothers and sisters used toothpicks for fine details. I may just have to give it a try - there is nothing like it - we were able to make our own designs, paint faces, names, etc. I'll keep you posted and if it works out I'll post pictures!
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Food coloring? Is this what you mean.
.
Ok, I am obviously older than the rest of you...they were glass bottles and yes, you could stick a q-tip in them. But I am beginning to wonder if maybe they just used to be in glass bottles!!! And the little plastic ones pictured (which I have, of course) are the "new and improved" - like everything else. There was no mixing with anything - just dip your q-tip in and paint on a warm egg - it would dry instantly so you could then paint with another color. My really artistic brothers and sisters used toothpicks for fine details. I may just have to give it a try - there is nothing like it - we were able to make our own designs, paint faces, names, etc. I'll keep you posted and if it works out I'll post pictures!
.
Suellen I am sure you are not older than me! But I don't remember the q-tip method you're describing. Maybe it was something your mom created for your family. Or maybe it's a regional thing.
 

JBloggs

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Here - check this SueE.
PS Sorry it says old fashioned...but hey that is what you said, when you were trying to find them, right?
 

JBloggs

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Wait here is where you can order them!
http://www.dochinkles.com/
and did we know THIS little fact? NOW WE KNOW...COOL
AUTHENTIC - made in PA Dutch Country, originators of egg-dyeing in the U.S.
The Pennsylvania Dutch brought the tradition of coloring Easter eggs to the United States. Doc Hinkle's continues that age-old fun. Created in 1893 by "Doc Hinkle" in a Lancaster County pharmacy, Doc Hinkle's egg dye is still manufactured in PA Dutch country.
Unlike ordinary dyes that have to be diluted, Doc Hinkle's is used directly from the bottle and results in beautiful, bright colors and patterns instead of dull single-colored eggs. Doc Hinkle's dries quickly and is so easy to use, even a young child can make exciting eggs with lines, squiggles and dots.
 

JBloggs

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I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful..
Innkeeper To Go said:
I lived in Hungary for a while and have since used the Hungarian method of dying eggs.
Save some old tights or stocking. Find some clover or herbs that would make a nice leaf imprint. Carefully place the leaf on the egg, wrap the egg with the leaf in a piece of the stockings. Knot off each end securely. Soak the eggs in tea. Remove the stockings and you'll have a lovely brownish finish to the egg with a delightful leaf imprint. Very easy. Always beautiful.
I had many items for sale here in our gift shop and still a few left that are tea or coffee dyed "Primitive" dolls etc. Muslin soaked in tea or coffee.
.
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
It's really amazing how well it works. I also use the tea method for making deviled eggs that look like they're marblized. Just shake the hardboiled eggs around in the stockpot so that they're pretty well cracked all around. Soak in the tea. When you peel them back, they're beautifully marbled.
Yes we have done that, I forgot about those. They are marbleized eggs or something
here they are - another fun method! Reminds me of the old pickled eggs, using beet juice.
.
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Yep, have done the beet juice thing, too. One thing they have a lot of in Hungary is beets!
*Warning* I am going to totally sidetrack this thread ...way off the charts...
In Australia the typical Oz burger has beetroot on it (also has fried egg, bacon, pineapple etc). McDonald's decided to make the McOz burger and quickly reduced the entire country's beet supply in one week. That was the only tupperware I used to own, it is a specially made container to make homemade beets. You lift the strainer up and pull the beets up out of the brine (vinegar and sugar). I need to get another one of those! When we were done with the beets I would toss the boiled eggs - after knocking them about a bit, into the brine overnight.
.
I have never seen that tupperware container but I'm totally going to be on the lookout for it now.
As for the Oz burger, well, that's an interesting combo isn't it? I have become quite the fan of beets but having them on a burger is something I have never tried! Hold the egg, please.
.
removed pix.
 
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