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Employer etiquette-does it pertain to Innkeeping?

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birdwatcher

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If I had not mentioned it before my husband and I are searching for an Innkeeping job. What is bothering me is that we take our time and considerable effort to be available to answer questions whether it be on-line or over the phone, we e-mail resumes with cover letters plus send references to the owners that call us if they are interested to know more about us when they respond to several on-line listings advertising that we are available.
We have answered questions, sent many many resumes had more than one phone ineterview with many owners and what really makes me mad is that weeks can go by without even a professional e-mail sent to us lettting us know if the position is still available, they are still thinking about it or even a
"sorry you don't...qualify, we found a better match blah blah blah.
But we've NEVER gotten a letter or phone call to let us know that the position has been filled.
So....is there anyone that has gone through this? What is the appropriate time that elapses from the time you make contact with the potential employer to the time we just say oh well, guess we didn't get the job. We have also e-mailed the potential employer if the position was still available with no reply.
Do owners talk to eachother? I just don't get it...I think its rude to do so. Its been two weeks now since we've spoken to some Inns, sent our resumes, spoke on the phone. Hey, it would just be great to get an answer instead of just ignoring it. But most of the time I don't get a letter of rejection from a potential employer-I guess its out of style now a days.
Thanks....for letting me vent.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Most of the time, it's not rudeness as much as being overwhelmed. And it's not unique to the innkeeping profession. Especially when hiring managers or owners receive large volumes of applicants, the chances that they're going to follow through and notify each one are not good.
Should they follow through? Yes. I always do. But don't count on that being the norm. Folks just get too busy and don't do all the things they want to do and this is one thing that often falls through the cracks.
How long should you wait? Not long. If you've had a telephone interview, was there any indication of when they'd be making a decision? If not, always ask them. Then if X date goes by and you call to check on where they are in the hiring process, you won't seem pushy. If no date was discussed and it's been a couple of weeks, by all means let them know you're still interested and find out what the status is.
Stay in touch with them, even if the job is no longer available. Things don't always work out with the first person they hire so the fact that you've been persistent and are still interested in the position may mean you'll get the gig sooner than you think.
Often the reasons for not hiring come down to money. They may not have enough money for the position. They may wonder if they have money to stay in business. Or they may have someone who is willing to basically work for nothing in today's tough climate.
Whatever it is, give them the benefit of the doubt and have lots and lots of patience.
Do owners talk to each other? Some don't. But many do.
If you suspect there's something being said among them that is hindering your ability to get a job, find out. It is always okay - in fact, it's a very good idea - to ask what it was about you/your experience/your references that prevented them from hiring you. Knowing what that was will help you get past it for the next place.
 

Morticia

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If an inn is seriously looking for employees, they should follow the same etiquette as any other business. When I get resumes for housekeeping jobs (or anything else) I send out a follow-up email saying thank you and to either please get back with us for an interview or to let them know the job has been filled. (The only time I won't do the follow-up is if I have the suspicion the email is spam.)
I can't imagine inns are getting hundreds of resumes for innkeepers, so it should not be too difficult for them to reply back one way or the other, especially if they have communicated their interest by asking for references or having a phone interview.
Now, once you have had the phone interview or sent in your resume, give the business 3 regular business days (M-F) to respond back to you with either more questions or an interview.
If you hear nothing, don't email, call. Call at a time that it is not inconvenient for the owners. Ask if the materials were received and if they have any other questions you can answer. Ask if they have hired someone. If they have, ask if there were qualifications you did not have, or if they have any suggestions for perhaps another inn they may know where there is the kind of employment you want. If the job is not filled, ask if they have narrowed it down to a few candidates and what more info could you give to them to help with the process.
You've had phone conversations with the owners, right? How did those go? Do you have a list in front of you of what your strong points are, how you ran your business, etc?
Do you know all about the inn you're applying at? Do you know who they are targeting as their guest? Can you talk to the owners with a clear vision of who they are and how you will fit into the organization? We like to say here at our place that every B&B has a personality. Our personality is not like our neighbor's or like other B&B's in town. Do you fit the personality of the inn you want to work at?
If I were looking for an innkeeping position there are inns who wouldn't hire me for all the tea in China. I don't fit their model. So, yes, there may be 10 inns looking for an innkeeper, but you may only fit 3 of them.
OK, the hard part...are you sounding desperate when you talk to them? If you have a 'failed' business in your resume you need to understand that not many employers want that to happen to their business. So, you need to have positive answers to those issues. You can't blame, blame for why things went wrong. (So, you need to really understand what went wrong, how you contributed to that and what was out of your control. And then you have to be able to explain that clearly to the employer.)
Now, one other thing and I'll shut up because this one is personal...a lot of people are very casual on here about their spelling, punctuation, etc. Are you casual in your emails, resume, etc? If you're not sure that your resume is top notch or that your emails are completely error-free, meet with someone locally (SCORE, some libraries have folks who will help, etc) who can review the resume. Don't send an email without going over it many times.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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If an inn is seriously looking for employees, they should follow the same etiquette as any other business. When I get resumes for housekeeping jobs (or anything else) I send out a follow-up email saying thank you and to either please get back with us for an interview or to let them know the job has been filled. (The only time I won't do the follow-up is if I have the suspicion the email is spam.)
I can't imagine inns are getting hundreds of resumes for innkeepers, so it should not be too difficult for them to reply back one way or the other, especially if they have communicated their interest by asking for references or having a phone interview.
Now, once you have had the phone interview or sent in your resume, give the business 3 regular business days (M-F) to respond back to you with either more questions or an interview.
If you hear nothing, don't email, call. Call at a time that it is not inconvenient for the owners. Ask if the materials were received and if they have any other questions you can answer. Ask if they have hired someone. If they have, ask if there were qualifications you did not have, or if they have any suggestions for perhaps another inn they may know where there is the kind of employment you want. If the job is not filled, ask if they have narrowed it down to a few candidates and what more info could you give to them to help with the process.
You've had phone conversations with the owners, right? How did those go? Do you have a list in front of you of what your strong points are, how you ran your business, etc?
Do you know all about the inn you're applying at? Do you know who they are targeting as their guest? Can you talk to the owners with a clear vision of who they are and how you will fit into the organization? We like to say here at our place that every B&B has a personality. Our personality is not like our neighbor's or like other B&B's in town. Do you fit the personality of the inn you want to work at?
If I were looking for an innkeeping position there are inns who wouldn't hire me for all the tea in China. I don't fit their model. So, yes, there may be 10 inns looking for an innkeeper, but you may only fit 3 of them.
OK, the hard part...are you sounding desperate when you talk to them? If you have a 'failed' business in your resume you need to understand that not many employers want that to happen to their business. So, you need to have positive answers to those issues. You can't blame, blame for why things went wrong. (So, you need to really understand what went wrong, how you contributed to that and what was out of your control. And then you have to be able to explain that clearly to the employer.)
Now, one other thing and I'll shut up because this one is personal...a lot of people are very casual on here about their spelling, punctuation, etc. Are you casual in your emails, resume, etc? If you're not sure that your resume is top notch or that your emails are completely error-free, meet with someone locally (SCORE, some libraries have folks who will help, etc) who can review the resume. Don't send an email without going over it many times..
Morticia said:
I can't imagine inns are getting hundreds of resumes for innkeepers, so it should not be too difficult for them to reply back one way or the other, especially if they have communicated their interest by asking for references or having a phone interview.
Morticia, I had over 300 applicants for the last part-time innkeeping position I had to fill. Seriously. It is tough out there.
 

Morticia

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If an inn is seriously looking for employees, they should follow the same etiquette as any other business. When I get resumes for housekeeping jobs (or anything else) I send out a follow-up email saying thank you and to either please get back with us for an interview or to let them know the job has been filled. (The only time I won't do the follow-up is if I have the suspicion the email is spam.)
I can't imagine inns are getting hundreds of resumes for innkeepers, so it should not be too difficult for them to reply back one way or the other, especially if they have communicated their interest by asking for references or having a phone interview.
Now, once you have had the phone interview or sent in your resume, give the business 3 regular business days (M-F) to respond back to you with either more questions or an interview.
If you hear nothing, don't email, call. Call at a time that it is not inconvenient for the owners. Ask if the materials were received and if they have any other questions you can answer. Ask if they have hired someone. If they have, ask if there were qualifications you did not have, or if they have any suggestions for perhaps another inn they may know where there is the kind of employment you want. If the job is not filled, ask if they have narrowed it down to a few candidates and what more info could you give to them to help with the process.
You've had phone conversations with the owners, right? How did those go? Do you have a list in front of you of what your strong points are, how you ran your business, etc?
Do you know all about the inn you're applying at? Do you know who they are targeting as their guest? Can you talk to the owners with a clear vision of who they are and how you will fit into the organization? We like to say here at our place that every B&B has a personality. Our personality is not like our neighbor's or like other B&B's in town. Do you fit the personality of the inn you want to work at?
If I were looking for an innkeeping position there are inns who wouldn't hire me for all the tea in China. I don't fit their model. So, yes, there may be 10 inns looking for an innkeeper, but you may only fit 3 of them.
OK, the hard part...are you sounding desperate when you talk to them? If you have a 'failed' business in your resume you need to understand that not many employers want that to happen to their business. So, you need to have positive answers to those issues. You can't blame, blame for why things went wrong. (So, you need to really understand what went wrong, how you contributed to that and what was out of your control. And then you have to be able to explain that clearly to the employer.)
Now, one other thing and I'll shut up because this one is personal...a lot of people are very casual on here about their spelling, punctuation, etc. Are you casual in your emails, resume, etc? If you're not sure that your resume is top notch or that your emails are completely error-free, meet with someone locally (SCORE, some libraries have folks who will help, etc) who can review the resume. Don't send an email without going over it many times..
Morticia said:
I can't imagine inns are getting hundreds of resumes for innkeepers, so it should not be too difficult for them to reply back one way or the other, especially if they have communicated their interest by asking for references or having a phone interview.
Morticia, I had over 300 applicants for the last part-time innkeeping position I had to fill. Seriously. It is tough out there.
.
Did you find they were really qualified people? Or was it a matter of 'Hey I can do that, how hard can that be?' sorts of resumes?
I had no idea. Really. I usually get resumes for people who want to arrange flowers or do my wine and cheese get togethers in the afternoon. (Neither of which are things we do here! One reason I suggested birdwatcher be sure the places she's applying are a good fit for what she wants to do.)
 

Innkeeper To Go

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If an inn is seriously looking for employees, they should follow the same etiquette as any other business. When I get resumes for housekeeping jobs (or anything else) I send out a follow-up email saying thank you and to either please get back with us for an interview or to let them know the job has been filled. (The only time I won't do the follow-up is if I have the suspicion the email is spam.)
I can't imagine inns are getting hundreds of resumes for innkeepers, so it should not be too difficult for them to reply back one way or the other, especially if they have communicated their interest by asking for references or having a phone interview.
Now, once you have had the phone interview or sent in your resume, give the business 3 regular business days (M-F) to respond back to you with either more questions or an interview.
If you hear nothing, don't email, call. Call at a time that it is not inconvenient for the owners. Ask if the materials were received and if they have any other questions you can answer. Ask if they have hired someone. If they have, ask if there were qualifications you did not have, or if they have any suggestions for perhaps another inn they may know where there is the kind of employment you want. If the job is not filled, ask if they have narrowed it down to a few candidates and what more info could you give to them to help with the process.
You've had phone conversations with the owners, right? How did those go? Do you have a list in front of you of what your strong points are, how you ran your business, etc?
Do you know all about the inn you're applying at? Do you know who they are targeting as their guest? Can you talk to the owners with a clear vision of who they are and how you will fit into the organization? We like to say here at our place that every B&B has a personality. Our personality is not like our neighbor's or like other B&B's in town. Do you fit the personality of the inn you want to work at?
If I were looking for an innkeeping position there are inns who wouldn't hire me for all the tea in China. I don't fit their model. So, yes, there may be 10 inns looking for an innkeeper, but you may only fit 3 of them.
OK, the hard part...are you sounding desperate when you talk to them? If you have a 'failed' business in your resume you need to understand that not many employers want that to happen to their business. So, you need to have positive answers to those issues. You can't blame, blame for why things went wrong. (So, you need to really understand what went wrong, how you contributed to that and what was out of your control. And then you have to be able to explain that clearly to the employer.)
Now, one other thing and I'll shut up because this one is personal...a lot of people are very casual on here about their spelling, punctuation, etc. Are you casual in your emails, resume, etc? If you're not sure that your resume is top notch or that your emails are completely error-free, meet with someone locally (SCORE, some libraries have folks who will help, etc) who can review the resume. Don't send an email without going over it many times..
Morticia said:
I can't imagine inns are getting hundreds of resumes for innkeepers, so it should not be too difficult for them to reply back one way or the other, especially if they have communicated their interest by asking for references or having a phone interview.
Morticia, I had over 300 applicants for the last part-time innkeeping position I had to fill. Seriously. It is tough out there.
.
Did you find they were really qualified people? Or was it a matter of 'Hey I can do that, how hard can that be?' sorts of resumes?
I had no idea. Really. I usually get resumes for people who want to arrange flowers or do my wine and cheese get togethers in the afternoon. (Neither of which are things we do here! One reason I suggested birdwatcher be sure the places she's applying are a good fit for what she wants to do.)
.
Around 25% of those, or more than 75 people, had innkeeping experience.
Another 35% had experience that was related, ie. good customer service skills, catering experience, etc.
Less than 25% of the total applicants were completely unqualified.
It's completely crazy out there right now and very difficult for experienced folks to even get their resume in front of someone.
 

birdwatcher

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Yes I write very formally, most of the potential employers have e-mailed US not the other way around, that is why I am so confused about the 100's of resumes you got Inkeeper to go. I did not initiate the email, are these e-mails bogus? perhaps because we are advertising our services and they call us? We even filled out an application, now I am a little worried that we put our SS#'s on the application that was needed for potential second interview, she has not contacted us since then.
If an employer has contacted YOU the potential employee is it different? I don't necessarily send out resumes to potential employers unless I have at least initiated contact with them. Now I am afraid that we gave way to much information over the internet to an employer that may not be an employer...thats got me thinking that someone could pose as a potential employer to extract information from us and take over our identity...ha ha that would be funny.
We don't devulge any information pertainig to our "failure" as a business. We tell them that at this time we have decided that we can no longer run our Inn, but because we love the profession we are seeking to manage their Inn. Does it mean that because we are selling our guest house that we "failed"? We can still legaly be a B & B but with only four rooms not nine. I don't regret having an Inn and I love to still take care of an Inn.
 

Morticia

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Yes I write very formally, most of the potential employers have e-mailed US not the other way around, that is why I am so confused about the 100's of resumes you got Inkeeper to go. I did not initiate the email, are these e-mails bogus? perhaps because we are advertising our services and they call us? We even filled out an application, now I am a little worried that we put our SS#'s on the application that was needed for potential second interview, she has not contacted us since then.
If an employer has contacted YOU the potential employee is it different? I don't necessarily send out resumes to potential employers unless I have at least initiated contact with them. Now I am afraid that we gave way to much information over the internet to an employer that may not be an employer...thats got me thinking that someone could pose as a potential employer to extract information from us and take over our identity...ha ha that would be funny.
We don't devulge any information pertainig to our "failure" as a business. We tell them that at this time we have decided that we can no longer run our Inn, but because we love the profession we are seeking to manage their Inn. Does it mean that because we are selling our guest house that we "failed"? We can still legaly be a B & B but with only four rooms not nine. I don't regret having an Inn and I love to still take care of an Inn..
I guess I'd be worried about someone who asked online for my SSN. I'd definitely be contacting that one. Where did you list your job online that so many people have contacted you and then let it drop? Given what seems to be a completely different experience on the other coast? Maybe your job listing gives out too much info?
No, I didn't mean you had failed because you were selling, but didn't you say awhile ago that things got so bad where you were you had no guests anymore? If an employer digs, they may wonder if something you did caused that so that's why I said you should be ready to answer that if it comes up.
Now, if you expect buyers to find your property for sale, perhaps employers did, too? Maybe someone checked your name online and found your place for sale.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Yes I write very formally, most of the potential employers have e-mailed US not the other way around, that is why I am so confused about the 100's of resumes you got Inkeeper to go. I did not initiate the email, are these e-mails bogus? perhaps because we are advertising our services and they call us? We even filled out an application, now I am a little worried that we put our SS#'s on the application that was needed for potential second interview, she has not contacted us since then.
If an employer has contacted YOU the potential employee is it different? I don't necessarily send out resumes to potential employers unless I have at least initiated contact with them. Now I am afraid that we gave way to much information over the internet to an employer that may not be an employer...thats got me thinking that someone could pose as a potential employer to extract information from us and take over our identity...ha ha that would be funny.
We don't devulge any information pertainig to our "failure" as a business. We tell them that at this time we have decided that we can no longer run our Inn, but because we love the profession we are seeking to manage their Inn. Does it mean that because we are selling our guest house that we "failed"? We can still legaly be a B & B but with only four rooms not nine. I don't regret having an Inn and I love to still take care of an Inn..
Yes, if they contact you it is absolutely different. And I'd be concerned that they are asking for your SS # in that case. Are they investor/management companies/recruiters or what? Your concern about knowing just who they are is well-founded. I'd sure be checking my credit file, if I were you.
As for your inn closing, I have interviewed many innkeepers who were former owners. Most of them didn't interview well, unfortunately. But the fact that their inn's didn't make it didn't stop me from considering them. They, sadly, dug their own graves in that regard. Much bitterness comes to mind but that wasn't necessarily true for all of them. Sometimes it was just general flakiness like showing up late for an interview. And I'm not hearing any bitterness from you in your posts so am guessing that's not the case for you. I'd really be much more concerned that these folks were never hiring anyone at all.
How to get around closing your inn? How were your online reviews? If they're good, make sure they know that. It's something tangible they can see and relate to.
Are there some particularly good references you could provide to them upfront? I had one person have her 3 references contact me directly right before her interview. And they followed up with written references faxed to me. I was so impressed with her tactics that I moved her to the front of the pack, even though her resume was not as impressive as some others. She was, BTW, a terrific innkeeper and it was a decision I never regretted.
All in all, though, there are so many issues that could be involved, it will only make you crazy to try to figure out why they're not calling. Call them and ask them what's up. What do you have to lose?
 

birdwatcher

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We have personal references, guest references- meaning people that have been at the Inn for several functions, and a business reference who knew us throughout the process from remodeling to updating the Inn to opening it. We have good reviews on Trip advisor and also have another B & B as a reference.
The SS# was from an Inn that is seeking an Innkeeper, as a matter of fact she called earlier this evening wanting an interview so I believe that was a legitimate application, but how do you know? so many of these inns are all over the country and why would any employer ask a potential innkeeper what draws them to a particular area when they are applying for the position at their Inn.
I really appreciate all the info and keep it coming.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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We have personal references, guest references- meaning people that have been at the Inn for several functions, and a business reference who knew us throughout the process from remodeling to updating the Inn to opening it. We have good reviews on Trip advisor and also have another B & B as a reference.
The SS# was from an Inn that is seeking an Innkeeper, as a matter of fact she called earlier this evening wanting an interview so I believe that was a legitimate application, but how do you know? so many of these inns are all over the country and why would any employer ask a potential innkeeper what draws them to a particular area when they are applying for the position at their Inn.
I really appreciate all the info and keep it coming..
Sure sounds like you're on the right track if they're wanting an interview. Good work!
Remember about the whole process that people hate hiring almost as much as they hate firing. So they're as nervous as you are. Often more so. So they'll ask things that seem dumb.
They also may use standard application forms that cover all the bases, including getting your permission to run a credit check (and get your social security number) or may want it to do a background check. It can actually be seen as a good sign that you're to that point.
Since you're applying to inns not near you geographically, though, be prepared to explain to them why you want to live there. They want to know you're going to stick around. So not only have a good answer ready for the interviews, but try to address it upfront. They also want to know that you know what's special about their area so you can really serve their guests. Often they may be awkward in how they ask that, but it's a legitimate concern for them.
Good luck with the interview! Let us know how it goes.
 

Morticia

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We have personal references, guest references- meaning people that have been at the Inn for several functions, and a business reference who knew us throughout the process from remodeling to updating the Inn to opening it. We have good reviews on Trip advisor and also have another B & B as a reference.
The SS# was from an Inn that is seeking an Innkeeper, as a matter of fact she called earlier this evening wanting an interview so I believe that was a legitimate application, but how do you know? so many of these inns are all over the country and why would any employer ask a potential innkeeper what draws them to a particular area when they are applying for the position at their Inn.
I really appreciate all the info and keep it coming..
The employer wants to know how long you are planning to stay! Are you merely 'shopping' for your retirement home, do you have family that would make you plan on staying, do you have ties to that community in some way?
I'm glad they got back with you, I was worried!
 

birdwatcher

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Great News-we think. We interviewed for an Inn yesterday and it went well. The owner said some things that made us think that we are one of the top contenders. The only problem we saw was that the previous Innkeepers where not great and lost some business for the Inn and this gets us worried that now the Inn has a bad reputation for not so great hosts. The recent Innkeepers where practically given their walking shoes. The owner was very honest about why and we think that we can turn the Inn around. They have an extensive advertising campaign coming for the next month or so to let everyone know that they have new Innkepers.
We have a second interview tomorrow, she said "Well you speak to eachother because you are thinking of your future now..." this makes me think that perhaps we will get the job.
If we do it will be both wonderful and frightening at the same time. But opening an Inn was both as well.
Anywone have any ideas as to what to ask the Owner before commiting to the job? We asked the obvious questions, any suggestions would be great. Thanks in advance.
This sounds like a great opportunity-its a 8 room Inn and its a beautiful house. Dont want to let out too much just yet.
 

Morticia

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Great News-we think. We interviewed for an Inn yesterday and it went well. The owner said some things that made us think that we are one of the top contenders. The only problem we saw was that the previous Innkeepers where not great and lost some business for the Inn and this gets us worried that now the Inn has a bad reputation for not so great hosts. The recent Innkeepers where practically given their walking shoes. The owner was very honest about why and we think that we can turn the Inn around. They have an extensive advertising campaign coming for the next month or so to let everyone know that they have new Innkepers.
We have a second interview tomorrow, she said "Well you speak to eachother because you are thinking of your future now..." this makes me think that perhaps we will get the job.
If we do it will be both wonderful and frightening at the same time. But opening an Inn was both as well.
Anywone have any ideas as to what to ask the Owner before commiting to the job? We asked the obvious questions, any suggestions would be great. Thanks in advance.
This sounds like a great opportunity-its a 8 room Inn and its a beautiful house. Dont want to let out too much just yet..
Sounds great!
I have no idea what to ask, but make a list of things you'd like to know. Sometimes you might know some of the answers already, but it helps to look interested in the area if you're not going somewhere local.
If you haven't already, offer a few suggestions as to what you think might be good ideas to implement if the previous innkeepers weren't the best. A local open house to meet you?
 

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birdwatcher said:
If I had not mentioned it before my husband and I are searching for an Innkeeping job. What is bothering me is that we take our time and considerable effort to be available to answer questions whether it be on-line or over the phone, we e-mail resumes with cover letters plus send references to the owners that call us if they are interested to know more about us when they respond to several on-line listings advertising that we are available.
We have answered questions, sent many many resumes had more than one phone ineterview with many owners and what really makes me mad is that weeks can go by without even a professional e-mail sent to us lettting us know if the position is still available, they are still thinking about it or even a
"sorry you don't...qualify, we found a better match blah blah blah.
But we've NEVER gotten a letter or phone call to let us know that the position has been filled.
So....is there anyone that has gone through this? What is the appropriate time that elapses from the time you make contact with the potential employer to the time we just say oh well, guess we didn't get the job. We have also e-mailed the potential employer if the position was still available with no reply.
Do owners talk to eachother? I just don't get it...I think its rude to do so. Its been two weeks now since we've spoken to some Inns, sent our resumes, spoke on the phone. Hey, it would just be great to get an answer instead of just ignoring it. But most of the time I don't get a letter of rejection from a potential employer-I guess its out of style now a days.
Thanks....for letting me vent.
Sorry, Birdwatcher, this is not exclusive to the innkeeping field. (I have personal obligations and cannot search for an innkeeping job, permanent or interim, unless it's nearby.)
I do not know if it is the current job climate. But it seems that so many applicants inquire about and/or apply for jobs that, unless I am contacted for an interview, I hear nothing ... and the silence is deafening.
I have been responding to all sorts of ads for jobs that I do qualify for and I rarely, if EVER, get an acknowledgement. I have a business degree and have worked in many types of businesses usually in management. Now I have all sorts of versions of my resume ... 'dumbed down' if you will ... so that I'm not labelled 'overqualified instead of 'needs a job'.
The last time I was seriously job hunting was in 2001 and I got responses nearly every time. Now it is the reverse. It is so rare that I receive an acknowledgement that I actually sent a thank you for a little printed thank you card that I received from a small town bank ... telling me they had hired someone but thanking me for my interest.
There is another issue I face as a job applicant. Many ads are not for jobs at all. They are scams to be secret shoppers or are for jobs that don't exist placed by unscrupulous recruiters just trying to get me on their books or people building mailing lists using the respondents contact info.
Most ridiculous was a supposed position as a dental office manager. I managed a dental office for 10 years so I applied. After a brief exchange when I pressed the 'interviewer' for the dental practice name I went searching for the practice and discovered it does not exist. It was just an attempt to get applicants to send for a 'free' dental whitening system (free except for shipping and then after 30 days a big bill would come due and an auto renew). The pitch was ... All our employees receive free dental care from day one of their employment, including dental whitening. Why not try the whitening system we recommend while we arrange the dentists' schedules to interview you? They are very interested! blech.
But I digress ... best of luck to you!
 

gillumhouse

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birdwatcher said:
If I had not mentioned it before my husband and I are searching for an Innkeeping job. What is bothering me is that we take our time and considerable effort to be available to answer questions whether it be on-line or over the phone, we e-mail resumes with cover letters plus send references to the owners that call us if they are interested to know more about us when they respond to several on-line listings advertising that we are available.
We have answered questions, sent many many resumes had more than one phone ineterview with many owners and what really makes me mad is that weeks can go by without even a professional e-mail sent to us lettting us know if the position is still available, they are still thinking about it or even a
"sorry you don't...qualify, we found a better match blah blah blah.
But we've NEVER gotten a letter or phone call to let us know that the position has been filled.
So....is there anyone that has gone through this? What is the appropriate time that elapses from the time you make contact with the potential employer to the time we just say oh well, guess we didn't get the job. We have also e-mailed the potential employer if the position was still available with no reply.
Do owners talk to eachother? I just don't get it...I think its rude to do so. Its been two weeks now since we've spoken to some Inns, sent our resumes, spoke on the phone. Hey, it would just be great to get an answer instead of just ignoring it. But most of the time I don't get a letter of rejection from a potential employer-I guess its out of style now a days.
Thanks....for letting me vent.
Sorry, Birdwatcher, this is not exclusive to the innkeeping field. (I have personal obligations and cannot search for an innkeeping job, permanent or interim, unless it's nearby.)
I do not know if it is the current job climate. But it seems that so many applicants inquire about and/or apply for jobs that, unless I am contacted for an interview, I hear nothing ... and the silence is deafening.
I have been responding to all sorts of ads for jobs that I do qualify for and I rarely, if EVER, get an acknowledgement. I have a business degree and have worked in many types of businesses usually in management. Now I have all sorts of versions of my resume ... 'dumbed down' if you will ... so that I'm not labelled 'overqualified instead of 'needs a job'.
The last time I was seriously job hunting was in 2001 and I got responses nearly every time. Now it is the reverse. It is so rare that I receive an acknowledgement that I actually sent a thank you for a little printed thank you card that I received from a small town bank ... telling me they had hired someone but thanking me for my interest.
There is another issue I face as a job applicant. Many ads are not for jobs at all. They are scams to be secret shoppers or are for jobs that don't exist placed by unscrupulous recruiters just trying to get me on their books or people building mailing lists using the respondents contact info.
Most ridiculous was a supposed position as a dental office manager. I managed a dental office for 10 years so I applied. After a brief exchange when I pressed the 'interviewer' for the dental practice name I went searching for the practice and discovered it does not exist. It was just an attempt to get applicants to send for a 'free' dental whitening system (free except for shipping and then after 30 days a big bill would come due and an auto renew). The pitch was ... All our employees receive free dental care from day one of their employment, including dental whitening. Why not try the whitening system we recommend while we arrange the dentists' schedules to interview you? They are very interested! blech.
But I digress ... best of luck to you!.
It was just an attempt to get applicants to send for a 'free' dental whitening system (free except for shipping and then after 30 days a big bill would come due and an auto renew).
THAT is horrible. Pond scum - and I guess I am insulting pond scum.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Great News-we think. We interviewed for an Inn yesterday and it went well. The owner said some things that made us think that we are one of the top contenders. The only problem we saw was that the previous Innkeepers where not great and lost some business for the Inn and this gets us worried that now the Inn has a bad reputation for not so great hosts. The recent Innkeepers where practically given their walking shoes. The owner was very honest about why and we think that we can turn the Inn around. They have an extensive advertising campaign coming for the next month or so to let everyone know that they have new Innkepers.
We have a second interview tomorrow, she said "Well you speak to eachother because you are thinking of your future now..." this makes me think that perhaps we will get the job.
If we do it will be both wonderful and frightening at the same time. But opening an Inn was both as well.
Anywone have any ideas as to what to ask the Owner before commiting to the job? We asked the obvious questions, any suggestions would be great. Thanks in advance.
This sounds like a great opportunity-its a 8 room Inn and its a beautiful house. Dont want to let out too much just yet..
That's just great news birdwatcher. I have a feeling I know which inn this is and, if it's the one I'm thinking of, it is indeed lovely.
You'll be surprised how quickly an inn's reputation can be turned back in the right direction with a loving touch.
Let us all know how it goes. We're all keeping our fingers crossed for you!
 

birdwatcher

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Thanks everyone, I'll let you know how it goes for us after this interview. Thanks for keeping your fingers crossed.
Morticia-I was thinking of this as well, perhaps a "Garden Party" since its spring and apparently they have really great gardens to meet the new Innkeepers? God, I'm projecting...does this mean I really hope that she offers us the job?:)
 

birdwatcher

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UPDATE: No interview, am visiting mom and had set up an interview here with the owner, but the owner when she called doesn't want the number displayed and it says "private caller" and mom's phone will not accept "private caller", missed the interview, she did e-mail me and we did communicate that way.
I am praying that she does not hold that against me, she would not give me her number so that I can call her...so I hope to get in touch when I return home.
Que Sera Sera....
 
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