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Olga

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Does any Bed and Breakfasts only have one room available?
 

egoodell

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There is a successful one in Tennesse called Blue Moon. With one room I would promote the privacy and service.
RIki
 

Joey Camb

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in the UK there arn't many as the fire regs for 1 room and for 10 are the same so its very expensive to have just 1.
 

Colleen848

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I haven't opened yet but I am planning on only having 2 rooms to start. I could have 3 but decided the room with the fireplace and a cover 18x20 porch would serve best as a common area to allow smokers to indulge.
Both of my rooms are located upstairs so I thought this was a better idea for now.
 

Olga

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs.
 

Innkeep

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Ouch. Bathrooms often make or break how well a B&B does. Since there is downstairs plumbing in the right area, please look carefully at the space available and see if you could install a nice shower ind enlarge the bathroom to fit it inside, even if it decreases room for the in-room eating area.
 

EmptyNest

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Sounds like you are pushing the envelope here trying to do a B & B. I don't think anyone would go for that...and I wouldn't want anyone wandering upstairs to my bathroom or another bathroom. Unless you can provide an in suite private bath I think you are going in the wrong direction. It is not a B& B.. just a homestay.
 

gillumhouse

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Toilet, sink, and shower is the minimum requirement. No shower? No guests! I had a claw-foot tub with a hand-held shower in our original bathroom. The claw-foot has beem moved to the created bathroom that also has a 48 inch shower and the original bathroom now has a 60 inch shower instead of a tub. If the room is on the first floor, the bathroom (including tub or shower) should be on the first floor - part of the accommodation.
 

egoodell

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Olga said:
I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs.
I don't think that would work. And the cost for one room would probably be more than it's worth unless you can add more rooms down the road. You have business license, insurance, credit card processing fees, occupancy taxes, state taxes....
RIki
 

Olga

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Olga said:
I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs.
I don't think that would work. And the cost for one room would probably be more than it's worth unless you can add more rooms down the road. You have business license, insurance, credit card processing fees, occupancy taxes, state taxes....
RIki
.
egoodell said:
Olga said:
I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs.
I don't think that would work. And the cost for one room would probably be more than it's worth unless you can add more rooms down the road. You have business license, insurance, credit card processing fees, occupancy taxes, state taxes....
RIki
It would be hard to turn a profit from the sounds of it with only one room. I might be better off just renting the room out ie: housemate.
 

EmptyNest

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Olga said:
I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs.
I don't think that would work. And the cost for one room would probably be more than it's worth unless you can add more rooms down the road. You have business license, insurance, credit card processing fees, occupancy taxes, state taxes....
RIki
.
egoodell said:
Olga said:
I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs.
I don't think that would work. And the cost for one room would probably be more than it's worth unless you can add more rooms down the road. You have business license, insurance, credit card processing fees, occupancy taxes, state taxes....
RIki
It would be hard to turn a profit from the sounds of it with only one room. I might be better off just renting the room out ie: housemate.
.
Turn a profit...sorry one room will not do that. You would be better off renting room to a housemate really. Do you even know if you can do that in your town according to zoning?? Better check.
 

Colleen848

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Toilet, sink, and shower is the minimum requirement. No shower? No guests! I had a claw-foot tub with a hand-held shower in our original bathroom. The claw-foot has beem moved to the created bathroom that also has a 48 inch shower and the original bathroom now has a 60 inch shower instead of a tub. If the room is on the first floor, the bathroom (including tub or shower) should be on the first floor - part of the accommodation.
.
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
 

gillumhouse

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Toilet, sink, and shower is the minimum requirement. No shower? No guests! I had a claw-foot tub with a hand-held shower in our original bathroom. The claw-foot has beem moved to the created bathroom that also has a 48 inch shower and the original bathroom now has a 60 inch shower instead of a tub. If the room is on the first floor, the bathroom (including tub or shower) should be on the first floor - part of the accommodation.
.
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
.
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
 

Madeleine

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Toilet, sink, and shower is the minimum requirement. No shower? No guests! I had a claw-foot tub with a hand-held shower in our original bathroom. The claw-foot has beem moved to the created bathroom that also has a 48 inch shower and the original bathroom now has a 60 inch shower instead of a tub. If the room is on the first floor, the bathroom (including tub or shower) should be on the first floor - part of the accommodation.
.
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
.
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
.
gillumhouse said:
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
I'm not creaky old but getting in and out of a really deep claw foot tub isn't easy. The best bet is to sit on the edge and swing in and out. But, if the opportunity presents itself I would suggest to anyone with one of these tubs to figure out how to get a grab bar bolted to a wall stud.
We stayed at a place with a free standing (ie- not close to a wall) tub and it was tough getting in and out with the way they had the curtain set up (so you wouldn't mistakenly flood the room downstairs). Couldn't swing in and out without getting tangled in the curtain.
 

Colleen848

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Toilet, sink, and shower is the minimum requirement. No shower? No guests! I had a claw-foot tub with a hand-held shower in our original bathroom. The claw-foot has beem moved to the created bathroom that also has a 48 inch shower and the original bathroom now has a 60 inch shower instead of a tub. If the room is on the first floor, the bathroom (including tub or shower) should be on the first floor - part of the accommodation.
.
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
.
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
.
gillumhouse said:
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
I'm not creaky old but getting in and out of a really deep claw foot tub isn't easy. The best bet is to sit on the edge and swing in and out. But, if the opportunity presents itself I would suggest to anyone with one of these tubs to figure out how to get a grab bar bolted to a wall stud.
We stayed at a place with a free standing (ie- not close to a wall) tub and it was tough getting in and out with the way they had the curtain set up (so you wouldn't mistakenly flood the room downstairs). Couldn't swing in and out without getting tangled in the curtain.
.
Actually after I have the D ring and shower curtain put up to my liking I thought about mounting a grip bar on the back wall as it is close enough. Yes, I would put holes through the new curtain but figured I could reinforced them with grommets where the grab bar screws go through. Also, caulk around them but that's not a big problem.
The other thing I'm going to purchase are those bedside steps but use them as a way to get in and out of the tub.
I had one of those very high beds when I had my first back surgery and I had a dickens of a time getting in and out of bed. I felt like a little kid sitting on the side as my feet came no where near the floor. When I purchased my new mattress set I opted for the half boxspring to take me off my "soap box". lol Makes life a lot easier for me.
 

gillumhouse

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Toilet, sink, and shower is the minimum requirement. No shower? No guests! I had a claw-foot tub with a hand-held shower in our original bathroom. The claw-foot has beem moved to the created bathroom that also has a 48 inch shower and the original bathroom now has a 60 inch shower instead of a tub. If the room is on the first floor, the bathroom (including tub or shower) should be on the first floor - part of the accommodation.
.
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
.
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
.
gillumhouse said:
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
I'm not creaky old but getting in and out of a really deep claw foot tub isn't easy. The best bet is to sit on the edge and swing in and out. But, if the opportunity presents itself I would suggest to anyone with one of these tubs to figure out how to get a grab bar bolted to a wall stud.
We stayed at a place with a free standing (ie- not close to a wall) tub and it was tough getting in and out with the way they had the curtain set up (so you wouldn't mistakenly flood the room downstairs). Couldn't swing in and out without getting tangled in the curtain.
.
Actually after I have the D ring and shower curtain put up to my liking I thought about mounting a grip bar on the back wall as it is close enough. Yes, I would put holes through the new curtain but figured I could reinforced them with grommets where the grab bar screws go through. Also, caulk around them but that's not a big problem.
The other thing I'm going to purchase are those bedside steps but use them as a way to get in and out of the tub.
I had one of those very high beds when I had my first back surgery and I had a dickens of a time getting in and out of bed. I felt like a little kid sitting on the side as my feet came no where near the floor. When I purchased my new mattress set I opted for the half boxspring to take me off my "soap box". lol Makes life a lot easier for me.
.
If you use those steps, make sure you have non-slip on the steps. Wet feet are like a greased pig on most surfaces.
For DH it was not just the depth - it was our tub (circa 1970) too and to take a shower, not sit in the tub. He had polio and has a paralyzed leg. I figure if he did it, there are more people (even "normal" people) who would do that.
 

Colleen848

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Toilet, sink, and shower is the minimum requirement. No shower? No guests! I had a claw-foot tub with a hand-held shower in our original bathroom. The claw-foot has beem moved to the created bathroom that also has a 48 inch shower and the original bathroom now has a 60 inch shower instead of a tub. If the room is on the first floor, the bathroom (including tub or shower) should be on the first floor - part of the accommodation.
.
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
.
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
.
gillumhouse said:
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
I'm not creaky old but getting in and out of a really deep claw foot tub isn't easy. The best bet is to sit on the edge and swing in and out. But, if the opportunity presents itself I would suggest to anyone with one of these tubs to figure out how to get a grab bar bolted to a wall stud.
We stayed at a place with a free standing (ie- not close to a wall) tub and it was tough getting in and out with the way they had the curtain set up (so you wouldn't mistakenly flood the room downstairs). Couldn't swing in and out without getting tangled in the curtain.
.
Actually after I have the D ring and shower curtain put up to my liking I thought about mounting a grip bar on the back wall as it is close enough. Yes, I would put holes through the new curtain but figured I could reinforced them with grommets where the grab bar screws go through. Also, caulk around them but that's not a big problem.
The other thing I'm going to purchase are those bedside steps but use them as a way to get in and out of the tub.
I had one of those very high beds when I had my first back surgery and I had a dickens of a time getting in and out of bed. I felt like a little kid sitting on the side as my feet came no where near the floor. When I purchased my new mattress set I opted for the half boxspring to take me off my "soap box". lol Makes life a lot easier for me.
.
If you use those steps, make sure you have non-slip on the steps. Wet feet are like a greased pig on most surfaces.
For DH it was not just the depth - it was our tub (circa 1970) too and to take a shower, not sit in the tub. He had polio and has a paralyzed leg. I figure if he did it, there are more people (even "normal" people) who would do that.
.
I planned on having no slip on the steps and secure it more firmly by placing it on a non slip bath rug so it doesn't go flying away.
Maybe I'll be brave enough to break out some of the wood working tools I've collected over the years and attempt to make one myself where the actual tread is not solid but rather more like a spa bench. That not a solid piece but slated to allow water to drip off.
Have the electrician part down and some circular saw stuff on wood. Mostly used to using die grinders, sabre saws etc on metal.
Heck, so many ideas might as well give it a shot and make exactly what I envision with any kind of luck.
Sorry to hear about DH. Such a shame. I was vaccinated when young.
Thanks so much for your advice.
 

gillumhouse

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Toilet, sink, and shower is the minimum requirement. No shower? No guests! I had a claw-foot tub with a hand-held shower in our original bathroom. The claw-foot has beem moved to the created bathroom that also has a 48 inch shower and the original bathroom now has a 60 inch shower instead of a tub. If the room is on the first floor, the bathroom (including tub or shower) should be on the first floor - part of the accommodation.
.
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
.
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
.
gillumhouse said:
Colleen848 said:
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
I never put up a shower curtain. My husband would use the shower curtain rod to steady himself getting in and out of a tub so I could envision the rod & ceiling crashing down on a guest doing likewise. No curtain. I had /have what they call a "telephone" showerhead (the hand held) in brass. In 1996 it was $400 at Lowe's. Still looks pretty. It is "the ol' swimmin' hole" deep.
I'm not creaky old but getting in and out of a really deep claw foot tub isn't easy. The best bet is to sit on the edge and swing in and out. But, if the opportunity presents itself I would suggest to anyone with one of these tubs to figure out how to get a grab bar bolted to a wall stud.
We stayed at a place with a free standing (ie- not close to a wall) tub and it was tough getting in and out with the way they had the curtain set up (so you wouldn't mistakenly flood the room downstairs). Couldn't swing in and out without getting tangled in the curtain.
.
Actually after I have the D ring and shower curtain put up to my liking I thought about mounting a grip bar on the back wall as it is close enough. Yes, I would put holes through the new curtain but figured I could reinforced them with grommets where the grab bar screws go through. Also, caulk around them but that's not a big problem.
The other thing I'm going to purchase are those bedside steps but use them as a way to get in and out of the tub.
I had one of those very high beds when I had my first back surgery and I had a dickens of a time getting in and out of bed. I felt like a little kid sitting on the side as my feet came no where near the floor. When I purchased my new mattress set I opted for the half boxspring to take me off my "soap box". lol Makes life a lot easier for me.
.
If you use those steps, make sure you have non-slip on the steps. Wet feet are like a greased pig on most surfaces.
For DH it was not just the depth - it was our tub (circa 1970) too and to take a shower, not sit in the tub. He had polio and has a paralyzed leg. I figure if he did it, there are more people (even "normal" people) who would do that.
.
I planned on having no slip on the steps and secure it more firmly by placing it on a non slip bath rug so it doesn't go flying away.
Maybe I'll be brave enough to break out some of the wood working tools I've collected over the years and attempt to make one myself where the actual tread is not solid but rather more like a spa bench. That not a solid piece but slated to allow water to drip off.
Have the electrician part down and some circular saw stuff on wood. Mostly used to using die grinders, sabre saws etc on metal.
Heck, so many ideas might as well give it a shot and make exactly what I envision with any kind of luck.
Sorry to hear about DH. Such a shame. I was vaccinated when young.
Thanks so much for your advice.
.
Good thoughts on the steps - make them bigger than the bed steps would be, more stability.
Re DH - last outbreak prior to the vaccine. That is life - and he did not sit in a corner and whine about it - not until he got to be a old grump who whines about getting old and what he cannot do any longer.
 

Samster

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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
The only successful one guest room B&Bs that I'm aware of have either location, location, location going for them or something unique to offer (like location). They are usually all-inclusive suites or guest accommodations with a full private bathroom ensuite. Did I mention that location is key?

 

Samster

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Location
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I have one room on the main level, and it is set apart from the rest of the house. Has its own entrance, and could have its own little eating area. The kitchen is just around the courner with a half bathroom available. The only thing is that the bathroom with the tub is upstairs..
Toilet, sink, and shower is the minimum requirement. No shower? No guests! I had a claw-foot tub with a hand-held shower in our original bathroom. The claw-foot has beem moved to the created bathroom that also has a 48 inch shower and the original bathroom now has a 60 inch shower instead of a tub. If the room is on the first floor, the bathroom (including tub or shower) should be on the first floor - part of the accommodation.
.
I'm keeping my original claw foot tub which I had reglazed so that it looks as if it's brand new.
Previously I had used some thin-wall conduit to create a complete curved "shower curtain" rod which completely surrounded the length and width of the tub. It was suspended from the ceiling with jack chain.
I also discovered that when the old faucet went that you can use a tub/shower faucet typically used for travel trailers.
But, now I went shopping on good 'ol Amazon to upgrade and have found chrome D ring rods made especially for those old tubs and reasonably priced faucets with the diverter valve for the shower head.
To my delight, I also found shower curtains with the additional width required for a claw foot tub so you don't have to use multiples.
Obviously you can't have shelves in this shower arrangement so I purchased the shower tray that spans across the tub.
This is where I'm starting. I love that old tub and it was original to the house. As I said it looks brand new. Just need to warn guests that if they decide to bathe they may need a life jacket because it's so deep!
.
Colleen, we have an original clawfoot tub in one of our guest baths & had it re-glazed. It is very slick, and so I put non-skid decals (that don't damage tub surfaces) in that tub. The addition of soap or shampoo to that surface could be a disaster for a guest! We also had clear bath mats for all our tubs in our B&B bathrooms. I would also advise being very careful with stairs in the bath. We had 3 large 2-person jetted tubs with steps that we put non-skid treads on and added grab bars. Better safe than sorry....
 

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