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JunieBJones (JBJ)

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if something weird is up there it is that I am on a temp pc...stuff is not loaded yet. sorry.
 

Morticia

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Hold on Nellie! The clientele here in my town is getting younger, not dying off. I'm insulted, but I guess I'm supposed to be. Let Telluride close up the last B&B in town, it is obvious they don't need it. But don't say the entire industry is dead. Yeesh. Some people are narrow thinkers. Bottom line thinking. It'll be the death of them yet.
 

seashanty

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i don't know anything about the economy in colorado
i do know that our overhead is very high ... but as for the bed and breakfast being an obsolete business model ... would love to hear the basis for the statement and why 'we all know that'
i have been so busy this past month, i could have booked the place twice over most every night .... i get comments every day from guests who say they LOVE bed and breakfasts and small inns ... they are seeking them out ... i also notice the trend in hotels to have 'bed and breakfast' experiences offered to guests ... so SOMEONE must be doing SOMETHING right, obsolete 'business model' or not!
 

IronGate

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i don't know anything about the economy in colorado
i do know that our overhead is very high ... but as for the bed and breakfast being an obsolete business model ... would love to hear the basis for the statement and why 'we all know that'
i have been so busy this past month, i could have booked the place twice over most every night .... i get comments every day from guests who say they LOVE bed and breakfasts and small inns ... they are seeking them out ... i also notice the trend in hotels to have 'bed and breakfast' experiences offered to guests ... so SOMEONE must be doing SOMETHING right, obsolete 'business model' or not!.
Telluride seems tailor-made for a B&B. Yes, it would be expensive to run due to the high cost of property and taxes, etc., but those costs are built into the rental rate. The clientele Telluride attracts would be able to afford it. The town is busy year round. I can't figure out where such a statement came from except personal bias, and the desire to sway others toward the easiest thing for him to do.
 

Willowpondgj

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i don't know anything about the economy in colorado
i do know that our overhead is very high ... but as for the bed and breakfast being an obsolete business model ... would love to hear the basis for the statement and why 'we all know that'
i have been so busy this past month, i could have booked the place twice over most every night .... i get comments every day from guests who say they LOVE bed and breakfasts and small inns ... they are seeking them out ... i also notice the trend in hotels to have 'bed and breakfast' experiences offered to guests ... so SOMEONE must be doing SOMETHING right, obsolete 'business model' or not!.
Telluride seems tailor-made for a B&B. Yes, it would be expensive to run due to the high cost of property and taxes, etc., but those costs are built into the rental rate. The clientele Telluride attracts would be able to afford it. The town is busy year round. I can't figure out where such a statement came from except personal bias, and the desire to sway others toward the easiest thing for him to do.
.
The cost of living is expensive in the mountains too, heating costs in winter and there are no big box stores within two hours...You have to go down the mountain to get bulk items...and that's just to target, gotta come here, Grand Junction, to get to a sam's club...that's 3.5 hours, one way! Otherwise it's Farmington New Mexico for the other Sams...almost the same distance. Yes they have winter biz, but it's really dangerous to drive up that Red Mountain pass in winter, so unless you can afford to fly in, it's not the safest trip...at 10,000 feet...
An inkeeper in Ouray, just a couple years ago, lost her husband when he was run off that pass by a truck in winter...sad...
Another issue, is the billionaires are buying up all the prime colorado property, Vail, Aspen, telluride, it's all becoming resort destination for the upperclass...
 

EmptyNest

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i don't know anything about the economy in colorado
i do know that our overhead is very high ... but as for the bed and breakfast being an obsolete business model ... would love to hear the basis for the statement and why 'we all know that'
i have been so busy this past month, i could have booked the place twice over most every night .... i get comments every day from guests who say they LOVE bed and breakfasts and small inns ... they are seeking them out ... i also notice the trend in hotels to have 'bed and breakfast' experiences offered to guests ... so SOMEONE must be doing SOMETHING right, obsolete 'business model' or not!.
Telluride seems tailor-made for a B&B. Yes, it would be expensive to run due to the high cost of property and taxes, etc., but those costs are built into the rental rate. The clientele Telluride attracts would be able to afford it. The town is busy year round. I can't figure out where such a statement came from except personal bias, and the desire to sway others toward the easiest thing for him to do.
.
The cost of living is expensive in the mountains too, heating costs in winter and there are no big box stores within two hours...You have to go down the mountain to get bulk items...and that's just to target, gotta come here, Grand Junction, to get to a sam's club...that's 3.5 hours, one way! Otherwise it's Farmington New Mexico for the other Sams...almost the same distance. Yes they have winter biz, but it's really dangerous to drive up that Red Mountain pass in winter, so unless you can afford to fly in, it's not the safest trip...at 10,000 feet...
An inkeeper in Ouray, just a couple years ago, lost her husband when he was run off that pass by a truck in winter...sad...
Another issue, is the billionaires are buying up all the prime colorado property, Vail, Aspen, telluride, it's all becoming resort destination for the upperclass...
.
Oh Yeah. Tom Cruise Country. i expect Oprah to buy there soon..She fell in love with his mountain top home.
 

IronGate

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i don't know anything about the economy in colorado
i do know that our overhead is very high ... but as for the bed and breakfast being an obsolete business model ... would love to hear the basis for the statement and why 'we all know that'
i have been so busy this past month, i could have booked the place twice over most every night .... i get comments every day from guests who say they LOVE bed and breakfasts and small inns ... they are seeking them out ... i also notice the trend in hotels to have 'bed and breakfast' experiences offered to guests ... so SOMEONE must be doing SOMETHING right, obsolete 'business model' or not!.
Telluride seems tailor-made for a B&B. Yes, it would be expensive to run due to the high cost of property and taxes, etc., but those costs are built into the rental rate. The clientele Telluride attracts would be able to afford it. The town is busy year round. I can't figure out where such a statement came from except personal bias, and the desire to sway others toward the easiest thing for him to do.
.
The cost of living is expensive in the mountains too, heating costs in winter and there are no big box stores within two hours...You have to go down the mountain to get bulk items...and that's just to target, gotta come here, Grand Junction, to get to a sam's club...that's 3.5 hours, one way! Otherwise it's Farmington New Mexico for the other Sams...almost the same distance. Yes they have winter biz, but it's really dangerous to drive up that Red Mountain pass in winter, so unless you can afford to fly in, it's not the safest trip...at 10,000 feet...
An inkeeper in Ouray, just a couple years ago, lost her husband when he was run off that pass by a truck in winter...sad...
Another issue, is the billionaires are buying up all the prime colorado property, Vail, Aspen, telluride, it's all becoming resort destination for the upperclass...
.
Very good points. IF I were going to open in Telluride, I would target the billionaires, and have a VERY high end place. I'd have to, to cover my costs. I would have everything delivered, because I certainly wouldn't be driving over Red Mountain in the winter; it's scary enough in the summer.
Telluride does have the Bluegrass Festival, the Film Festival and other festivals to keep things going over the summer.
edit: of course, the PITA quotient will probably go way up with a high-end place.
 

gillumhouse

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My comment to the article.
But the San Sophias owner simply recognized the shifting landscape, de Pagter said.
I think we all realize that a bed-and-breakfast is an obsolete business model, he said. There used to be, 10 years ago, a half-dozen bed and breakfasts the San Sophias the only one remaining. People are moving away from bed and breakfasts, and the clientele that used to go there are dying off or getting old and gray.
I respectfully submit that this person does not have a clue about the subject of bed & breakfast as a business. IF his assertion is true, why are so many hotel chains now advertising that they offer the bed & breakfast experience? I do believe the assertion that B & B clientelle are dying off or old and gray is insulting and totally off the mark. I do happen to be an innkeeper and many of my guests are young people - some just finishing college - who are trying a bed & breakfast and once they do, become converts to choosing a B & B over a hotel. They like the personal attention and the feeling of (their word) hominess. My guests appreciate being treated as the important people they are - they ARE my guests so they are important! Perhaps the true reason for this assertion is that a B & B will not make huge profits and requires a lot of work. But my B & B allows me to live in the city I choose to live in and in the big, old, lovely house I want to live in and have many visitors - both new and returning..
 

Samster

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My comment to the article.
But the San Sophias owner simply recognized the shifting landscape, de Pagter said.
I think we all realize that a bed-and-breakfast is an obsolete business model, he said. There used to be, 10 years ago, a half-dozen bed and breakfasts the San Sophias the only one remaining. People are moving away from bed and breakfasts, and the clientele that used to go there are dying off or getting old and gray.
I respectfully submit that this person does not have a clue about the subject of bed & breakfast as a business. IF his assertion is true, why are so many hotel chains now advertising that they offer the bed & breakfast experience? I do believe the assertion that B & B clientelle are dying off or old and gray is insulting and totally off the mark. I do happen to be an innkeeper and many of my guests are young people - some just finishing college - who are trying a bed & breakfast and once they do, become converts to choosing a B & B over a hotel. They like the personal attention and the feeling of (their word) hominess. My guests appreciate being treated as the important people they are - they ARE my guests so they are important! Perhaps the true reason for this assertion is that a B & B will not make huge profits and requires a lot of work. But my B & B allows me to live in the city I choose to live in and in the big, old, lovely house I want to live in and have many visitors - both new and returning...
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.

 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

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Today no gray haired guests. Well on couple dropped their daughter at college yesterday, but not officially what I called Gray tops. But we usually have our share.
 

Morticia

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My comment to the article.
But the San Sophias owner simply recognized the shifting landscape, de Pagter said.
I think we all realize that a bed-and-breakfast is an obsolete business model, he said. There used to be, 10 years ago, a half-dozen bed and breakfasts the San Sophias the only one remaining. People are moving away from bed and breakfasts, and the clientele that used to go there are dying off or getting old and gray.
I respectfully submit that this person does not have a clue about the subject of bed & breakfast as a business. IF his assertion is true, why are so many hotel chains now advertising that they offer the bed & breakfast experience? I do believe the assertion that B & B clientelle are dying off or old and gray is insulting and totally off the mark. I do happen to be an innkeeper and many of my guests are young people - some just finishing college - who are trying a bed & breakfast and once they do, become converts to choosing a B & B over a hotel. They like the personal attention and the feeling of (their word) hominess. My guests appreciate being treated as the important people they are - they ARE my guests so they are important! Perhaps the true reason for this assertion is that a B & B will not make huge profits and requires a lot of work. But my B & B allows me to live in the city I choose to live in and in the big, old, lovely house I want to live in and have many visitors - both new and returning...
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.

.
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...

 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

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My comment to the article.
But the San Sophias owner simply recognized the shifting landscape, de Pagter said.
I think we all realize that a bed-and-breakfast is an obsolete business model, he said. There used to be, 10 years ago, a half-dozen bed and breakfasts the San Sophias the only one remaining. People are moving away from bed and breakfasts, and the clientele that used to go there are dying off or getting old and gray.
I respectfully submit that this person does not have a clue about the subject of bed & breakfast as a business. IF his assertion is true, why are so many hotel chains now advertising that they offer the bed & breakfast experience? I do believe the assertion that B & B clientelle are dying off or old and gray is insulting and totally off the mark. I do happen to be an innkeeper and many of my guests are young people - some just finishing college - who are trying a bed & breakfast and once they do, become converts to choosing a B & B over a hotel. They like the personal attention and the feeling of (their word) hominess. My guests appreciate being treated as the important people they are - they ARE my guests so they are important! Perhaps the true reason for this assertion is that a B & B will not make huge profits and requires a lot of work. But my B & B allows me to live in the city I choose to live in and in the big, old, lovely house I want to live in and have many visitors - both new and returning...
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.

.
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...

.
Bree said:
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...
WE? Oh you must mean the Mr Gnomey.
 

Samster

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My comment to the article.
But the San Sophias owner simply recognized the shifting landscape, de Pagter said.
I think we all realize that a bed-and-breakfast is an obsolete business model, he said. There used to be, 10 years ago, a half-dozen bed and breakfasts the San Sophias the only one remaining. People are moving away from bed and breakfasts, and the clientele that used to go there are dying off or getting old and gray.
I respectfully submit that this person does not have a clue about the subject of bed & breakfast as a business. IF his assertion is true, why are so many hotel chains now advertising that they offer the bed & breakfast experience? I do believe the assertion that B & B clientelle are dying off or old and gray is insulting and totally off the mark. I do happen to be an innkeeper and many of my guests are young people - some just finishing college - who are trying a bed & breakfast and once they do, become converts to choosing a B & B over a hotel. They like the personal attention and the feeling of (their word) hominess. My guests appreciate being treated as the important people they are - they ARE my guests so they are important! Perhaps the true reason for this assertion is that a B & B will not make huge profits and requires a lot of work. But my B & B allows me to live in the city I choose to live in and in the big, old, lovely house I want to live in and have many visitors - both new and returning...
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.

.
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...

.
Bree said:
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...
WE? Oh you must mean the Mr Gnomey.
.
Haha! How is Mr. Gnomey? My dh has been the one with the gray hair here - I think he's older than any guest we've had. I asked him & he actually agrees.
 

YellowSocks

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Dh was shocked to meet the guests today... since they were visiting their son who lives in town they must be older than us... they looked our age or younger. I haven't broken it to him yet that that's because we're old enough to have a son in college.
=)
Kk.
 

Morticia

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My comment to the article.
But the San Sophias owner simply recognized the shifting landscape, de Pagter said.
I think we all realize that a bed-and-breakfast is an obsolete business model, he said. There used to be, 10 years ago, a half-dozen bed and breakfasts the San Sophias the only one remaining. People are moving away from bed and breakfasts, and the clientele that used to go there are dying off or getting old and gray.
I respectfully submit that this person does not have a clue about the subject of bed & breakfast as a business. IF his assertion is true, why are so many hotel chains now advertising that they offer the bed & breakfast experience? I do believe the assertion that B & B clientelle are dying off or old and gray is insulting and totally off the mark. I do happen to be an innkeeper and many of my guests are young people - some just finishing college - who are trying a bed & breakfast and once they do, become converts to choosing a B & B over a hotel. They like the personal attention and the feeling of (their word) hominess. My guests appreciate being treated as the important people they are - they ARE my guests so they are important! Perhaps the true reason for this assertion is that a B & B will not make huge profits and requires a lot of work. But my B & B allows me to live in the city I choose to live in and in the big, old, lovely house I want to live in and have many visitors - both new and returning...
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.

.
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...

.
Bree said:
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...
WE? Oh you must mean the Mr Gnomey.
.
JunieBJones (JBJ) said:
Bree said:
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...
WE? Oh you must mean the Mr Gnomey.
Sorry, knew I should have edited that 'we'.

 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

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My comment to the article.
But the San Sophias owner simply recognized the shifting landscape, de Pagter said.
I think we all realize that a bed-and-breakfast is an obsolete business model, he said. There used to be, 10 years ago, a half-dozen bed and breakfasts the San Sophias the only one remaining. People are moving away from bed and breakfasts, and the clientele that used to go there are dying off or getting old and gray.
I respectfully submit that this person does not have a clue about the subject of bed & breakfast as a business. IF his assertion is true, why are so many hotel chains now advertising that they offer the bed & breakfast experience? I do believe the assertion that B & B clientelle are dying off or old and gray is insulting and totally off the mark. I do happen to be an innkeeper and many of my guests are young people - some just finishing college - who are trying a bed & breakfast and once they do, become converts to choosing a B & B over a hotel. They like the personal attention and the feeling of (their word) hominess. My guests appreciate being treated as the important people they are - they ARE my guests so they are important! Perhaps the true reason for this assertion is that a B & B will not make huge profits and requires a lot of work. But my B & B allows me to live in the city I choose to live in and in the big, old, lovely house I want to live in and have many visitors - both new and returning...
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.

.
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...

.
Bree said:
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...
WE? Oh you must mean the Mr Gnomey.
.
Haha! How is Mr. Gnomey? My dh has been the one with the gray hair here - I think he's older than any guest we've had. I asked him & he actually agrees.
.
Samster said:
Haha! How is Mr. Gnomey? My dh has been the one with the gray hair here - I think he's older than any guest we've had. I asked him & he actually agrees.
Remember my guest who was the old grey mare and her hubby the young man. I have encounter TWO of that situation in this B&B. SUre I have had 10 or 15 yr diff's, but this was DRASTIC. We are talking she with a CANE and OSTEO and he is like 30 years old.
 

Willowpondgj

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My comment to the article.
But the San Sophias owner simply recognized the shifting landscape, de Pagter said.
I think we all realize that a bed-and-breakfast is an obsolete business model, he said. There used to be, 10 years ago, a half-dozen bed and breakfasts the San Sophias the only one remaining. People are moving away from bed and breakfasts, and the clientele that used to go there are dying off or getting old and gray.
I respectfully submit that this person does not have a clue about the subject of bed & breakfast as a business. IF his assertion is true, why are so many hotel chains now advertising that they offer the bed & breakfast experience? I do believe the assertion that B & B clientelle are dying off or old and gray is insulting and totally off the mark. I do happen to be an innkeeper and many of my guests are young people - some just finishing college - who are trying a bed & breakfast and once they do, become converts to choosing a B & B over a hotel. They like the personal attention and the feeling of (their word) hominess. My guests appreciate being treated as the important people they are - they ARE my guests so they are important! Perhaps the true reason for this assertion is that a B & B will not make huge profits and requires a lot of work. But my B & B allows me to live in the city I choose to live in and in the big, old, lovely house I want to live in and have many visitors - both new and returning...
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.

.
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...

.
Bree said:
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...
WE? Oh you must mean the Mr Gnomey.
.
Haha! How is Mr. Gnomey? My dh has been the one with the gray hair here - I think he's older than any guest we've had. I asked him & he actually agrees.
.
Samster said:
Haha! How is Mr. Gnomey? My dh has been the one with the gray hair here - I think he's older than any guest we've had. I asked him & he actually agrees.
Remember my guest who was the old grey mare and her hubby the young man. I have encounter TWO of that situation in this B&B. SUre I have had 10 or 15 yr diff's, but this was DRASTIC. We are talking she with a CANE and OSTEO and he is like 30 years old.
.
Sugar mama!
 

gillumhouse

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My comment to the article.
But the San Sophias owner simply recognized the shifting landscape, de Pagter said.
I think we all realize that a bed-and-breakfast is an obsolete business model, he said. There used to be, 10 years ago, a half-dozen bed and breakfasts the San Sophias the only one remaining. People are moving away from bed and breakfasts, and the clientele that used to go there are dying off or getting old and gray.
I respectfully submit that this person does not have a clue about the subject of bed & breakfast as a business. IF his assertion is true, why are so many hotel chains now advertising that they offer the bed & breakfast experience? I do believe the assertion that B & B clientelle are dying off or old and gray is insulting and totally off the mark. I do happen to be an innkeeper and many of my guests are young people - some just finishing college - who are trying a bed & breakfast and once they do, become converts to choosing a B & B over a hotel. They like the personal attention and the feeling of (their word) hominess. My guests appreciate being treated as the important people they are - they ARE my guests so they are important! Perhaps the true reason for this assertion is that a B & B will not make huge profits and requires a lot of work. But my B & B allows me to live in the city I choose to live in and in the big, old, lovely house I want to live in and have many visitors - both new and returning...
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.

.
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...

.
Bree said:
Samster said:
I've actually had very few gray haired guests here.
That's only because we dyed our hair before we came...
WE? Oh you must mean the Mr Gnomey.
.
Haha! How is Mr. Gnomey? My dh has been the one with the gray hair here - I think he's older than any guest we've had. I asked him & he actually agrees.
.
Samster said:
Haha! How is Mr. Gnomey? My dh has been the one with the gray hair here - I think he's older than any guest we've had. I asked him & he actually agrees.
Remember my guest who was the old grey mare and her hubby the young man. I have encounter TWO of that situation in this B&B. SUre I have had 10 or 15 yr diff's, but this was DRASTIC. We are talking she with a CANE and OSTEO and he is like 30 years old.
.
Oh to have the wherewithal to even consider having a Boy Toy!
 
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