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Musty Towels

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JeannineIrish

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They was a review in another thread that brought up the issue of musty smelling towels. We have stayed at a couple of B & B'sn the past that had musty smelling towels. Even in our own B & B I have on occassion had musty smelling towels (usually the are dark colors). Has anyone else encountered this at their own place and how do you get rid of the musty smell or do you just throw them out when this happens?
 

seashanty

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i did have that problem on occasion ... it almost seemed to me that the problem was if they sat in the washer too long before being dried. but washing them and prompt drying got the smell out.
if the smell stays after laundering and drying again, is their mildew on anything? in one little house i rented, there was a mildew problem in one area ... had to run a dehumidifier. it was a ventilation problem.
 

Proud Texan

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We line dry ours when possible. This seems to prevent it.
 

scrambled_eggs

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I've never had the problem unless the towels were lefts damp out of the dryer for a long time or sat for a long time in a big wet wad. Maybe you should try using Tide to get the smell out. Tide seems to get everything out for me.
 

seashanty

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no line drying in seagull land ... for obvious reasons.
 

Proud Texan

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EmptyNest

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Use some bleach when you wash them. Make sure they are thoroughly dry before you fold and put away. If it gets to the point where you can't get rid of the mustiness...for me...it would be time to turn them into cleaning rags and get new ones.
 

JeannineIrish

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I've never had the problem unless the towels were lefts damp out of the dryer for a long time or sat for a long time in a big wet wad. Maybe you should try using Tide to get the smell out. Tide seems to get everything out for me..
oceans said:
I've never had the problem unless the towels were lefts damp out of the dryer for a long time or sat for a long time in a big wet wad. Maybe you should try using Tide to get the smell out. Tide seems to get everything out for me.
We use Tide. I thought adding Clorax II would help and it has helped some.
 

JeannineIrish

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Use some bleach when you wash them. Make sure they are thoroughly dry before you fold and put away. If it gets to the point where you can't get rid of the mustiness...for me...it would be time to turn them into cleaning rags and get new ones..
catlady said:
Use some bleach when you wash them. Make sure they are thoroughly dry before you fold and put away. If it gets to the point where you can't get rid of the mustiness...for me...it would be time to turn them into cleaning rags and get new ones.
But it seems to only occur with the dark colored towels, not the cream colored which we don't add bleach to. Of course bleach is used on the whites and we don't have a problem with them.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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I have only had a problem with this when towels go unused for a period of time. I can't say I have noticed it more with one color than another. I do have more of a problem with musty sheets than towels. I keep specific 'fancy' sheet sets for special occasions like honeymoons. These are lovely embrodered sets and often get musty between uses. Unfortunately, I have no other option but to rewash and press them. I wish I could find an easier way.
Maybe I could store them in plastic with a scented dryer sheet ...
 

ginocat

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I have only had a problem with this when towels go unused for a period of time. I can't say I have noticed it more with one color than another. I do have more of a problem with musty sheets than towels. I keep specific 'fancy' sheet sets for special occasions like honeymoons. These are lovely embrodered sets and often get musty between uses. Unfortunately, I have no other option but to rewash and press them. I wish I could find an easier way.
Maybe I could store them in plastic with a scented dryer sheet ...
.
Storing them in plastic will only be worse. Storing with a dryer sheet would make them toxic.
Towels smell because of bacteria and oils coming off our bodies. It is impossible to kill the bacteria with detergent and water - you need bleach!!! You will not kill e. coli unless you use bleach. Think about where those face cloths and towels go!!!
 

wendydk

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i did have that problem on occasion ... it almost seemed to me that the problem was if they sat in the washer too long before being dried. but washing them and prompt drying got the smell out.
if the smell stays after laundering and drying again, is their mildew on anything? in one little house i rented, there was a mildew problem in one area ... had to run a dehumidifier. it was a ventilation problem..
Yes, SS. I had that problem sometimes when towels were left in the washer for too long before drying. Stopped happening altogether when I bought the Bosch front-loading laundry equipement. Towels can sit in the washer for days and days without mustiness. Must be the airtightness.
 

JeannineIrish

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I have only had a problem with this when towels go unused for a period of time. I can't say I have noticed it more with one color than another. I do have more of a problem with musty sheets than towels. I keep specific 'fancy' sheet sets for special occasions like honeymoons. These are lovely embrodered sets and often get musty between uses. Unfortunately, I have no other option but to rewash and press them. I wish I could find an easier way.
Maybe I could store them in plastic with a scented dryer sheet ...
.
Storing them in plastic will only be worse. Storing with a dryer sheet would make them toxic.
Towels smell because of bacteria and oils coming off our bodies. It is impossible to kill the bacteria with detergent and water - you need bleach!!! You will not kill e. coli unless you use bleach. Think about where those face cloths and towels go!!!
.
ginocat said:
Think about where those face cloths and towels go!!!
Too much information. I get the drift of "dreft"

 

The Farmers Daughter

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I have only had a problem with this when towels go unused for a period of time. I can't say I have noticed it more with one color than another. I do have more of a problem with musty sheets than towels. I keep specific 'fancy' sheet sets for special occasions like honeymoons. These are lovely embrodered sets and often get musty between uses. Unfortunately, I have no other option but to rewash and press them. I wish I could find an easier way.
Maybe I could store them in plastic with a scented dryer sheet ...
.
Storing them in plastic will only be worse. Storing with a dryer sheet would make them toxic.
Towels smell because of bacteria and oils coming off our bodies. It is impossible to kill the bacteria with detergent and water - you need bleach!!! You will not kill e. coli unless you use bleach. Think about where those face cloths and towels go!!!
.
ginocat said:
Storing them in plastic will only be worse. Storing with a dryer sheet would make them toxic.
Thats good to know....that would have never occured to me.
 

EmptyNest

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I have only had a problem with this when towels go unused for a period of time. I can't say I have noticed it more with one color than another. I do have more of a problem with musty sheets than towels. I keep specific 'fancy' sheet sets for special occasions like honeymoons. These are lovely embrodered sets and often get musty between uses. Unfortunately, I have no other option but to rewash and press them. I wish I could find an easier way.
Maybe I could store them in plastic with a scented dryer sheet ...
.
Storing them in plastic will only be worse. Storing with a dryer sheet would make them toxic.
Towels smell because of bacteria and oils coming off our bodies. It is impossible to kill the bacteria with detergent and water - you need bleach!!! You will not kill e. coli unless you use bleach. Think about where those face cloths and towels go!!!
.
ginocat said:
Storing them in plastic will only be worse. Storing with a dryer sheet would make them toxic.
Thats good to know....that would have never occured to me.
.
Toxic is in the eye of the beholder.
Storing fine linens in plastic is NEVER a good idea. But I have used dryer sheets on my shelves in the linen closet to keep things fresh.( I have the coated wire shelving in my closets.)
Here is what I have been told.
* Let linens breathe. Use containers/ shelving that allow airflow. A mesh container keeps napkins organized and allows air to circulate. When the lid is not sealed, underbed storage boxes are a good option.
* Store in a constant temperature. Natural fibers don't enjoy extreme temperature changes. Attics or basements are not good for storing linens.
* Pamper with paper. When storing linens flat, line hardwood surfaces with white tissue paper or white fabric. Woods, especially cedar, contain oils that can be harmful to linens.
* Hangers can help. Hang tablecloths and bedding in closets on drapery hangers. Fold a rectangular cloth so it fits on a hanger. A round cloth is folded to form a triangle. Refold to avoid creases. Insert tissue paper between the folds.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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I have only had a problem with this when towels go unused for a period of time. I can't say I have noticed it more with one color than another. I do have more of a problem with musty sheets than towels. I keep specific 'fancy' sheet sets for special occasions like honeymoons. These are lovely embrodered sets and often get musty between uses. Unfortunately, I have no other option but to rewash and press them. I wish I could find an easier way.
Maybe I could store them in plastic with a scented dryer sheet ...
.
Storing them in plastic will only be worse. Storing with a dryer sheet would make them toxic.
Towels smell because of bacteria and oils coming off our bodies. It is impossible to kill the bacteria with detergent and water - you need bleach!!! You will not kill e. coli unless you use bleach. Think about where those face cloths and towels go!!!
.
ginocat said:
Storing them in plastic will only be worse. Storing with a dryer sheet would make them toxic.
Thats good to know....that would have never occured to me.
.
Toxic is in the eye of the beholder.
Storing fine linens in plastic is NEVER a good idea. But I have used dryer sheets on my shelves in the linen closet to keep things fresh.( I have the coated wire shelving in my closets.)
Here is what I have been told.
* Let linens breathe. Use containers/ shelving that allow airflow. A mesh container keeps napkins organized and allows air to circulate. When the lid is not sealed, underbed storage boxes are a good option.
* Store in a constant temperature. Natural fibers don't enjoy extreme temperature changes. Attics or basements are not good for storing linens.
* Pamper with paper. When storing linens flat, line hardwood surfaces with white tissue paper or white fabric. Woods, especially cedar, contain oils that can be harmful to linens.
* Hangers can help. Hang tablecloths and bedding in closets on drapery hangers. Fold a rectangular cloth so it fits on a hanger. A round cloth is folded to form a triangle. Refold to avoid creases. Insert tissue paper between the folds.
.
catlady said:
Toxic is in the eye of the beholder.
Storing fine linens in plastic is NEVER a good idea. But I have used dryer sheets on my shelves in the linen closet to keep things fresh.( I have the coated wire shelving in my closets.)
Here is what I have been told.
* Let linens breathe. Use containers/ shelving that allow airflow. A mesh container keeps napkins organized and allows air to circulate. When the lid is not sealed, underbed storage boxes are a good option.
* Store in a constant temperature. Natural fibers don't enjoy extreme temperature changes. Attics or basements are not good for storing linens.
* Pamper with paper. When storing linens flat, line hardwood surfaces with white tissue paper or white fabric. Woods, especially cedar, contain oils that can be harmful to linens.
* Hangers can help. Hang tablecloths and bedding in closets on drapery hangers. Fold a rectangular cloth so it fits on a hanger. A round cloth is folded to form a triangle. Refold to avoid creases. Insert tissue paper between the folds.
Thanks CL. Thats great information!

 

Innkeep

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I use vinegar in the fabric softener dispenser.
 
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