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April

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Do you ask your guests to remove their outdoor shoes in the house? What is your policy and how you handle this?
 

EmptyNest

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This can vary from inn to inn. One of our members here makes it clear on his website that shoes are to be taken off, We never required that..but it surprised me how many people actually did it before coming in. Their mothers must have trained them well.
We just told them not to worry about it. We did not worry..We can always clean the floor or carpet. Never had a real issue with it.
Another friend nearby..as slippers right in the entry foyer for guests when they arrive.
So you can post a small sign at your entrance so guest know what to expect, put it in your on line poliices and in your in room policy posting etc. Just be clear aout it right up front.
 

egoodell

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I don't expect guests to do this. I know others do, and it makes sense in climates where there is a lot of snow and mud, but I don't think it makes sense here in wine country. But again, I had Chris put in knotty pine flooring, and nothing shows on it!!!
Riki
 

Samster

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No. They are paying to stay here. I'll clean the floors or area rugs as needed. I have welcome mats for them to wipe their shoes. I would feel awkward asking paying guests to do this, but maybe that is just me!
 

muirford

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We do not ask it or expect it - the floors have been taking a beating since 1868 and still look good. Some bicyclists take them off before coming in, especially if they are muddy. Frankly I'd rather have them knock the dirt off inside the front door on my inexpensive rug than in my rooms and on my towels.
As a guest, I would not be very happy to be required to remove my shoes at the front door - and if I knew in advance I would be asked to, I would not book a room there. I broke my ankle badly several years ago and have sciatica affecting my other leg. My physical therapist recommended that I wear sneakers with good ankle support all the time, if possible. I'm not crazy about walking around unfamiliar territory with no shoes or in slippers that are not supportive.
 

inncogneeto

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We don't ask, but many do, we too have mats and boot scrubbers at the door...We always ask that they wipe their feet before entering, but only during fruit season...
I personally and physically could not to it, doctors orders not to go barefoot, so if I was asked, I might leave too, unless they are offering orthopoedic slippers for me to wear!
 

swirt

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I don't ask people to remove their shoes. And as a guest I'm not a fan of removing mine. I wouldn't leave if asked, but I wouldn't return ;) And if I saw it listed as a request on their website, it would push them toward the bottom of the list of possible places to stay.
 

Morticia

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I don't require it, but many guests do it anyway as soon as they see the hardwood floors.
 

Samster

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We do not ask it or expect it - the floors have been taking a beating since 1868 and still look good. Some bicyclists take them off before coming in, especially if they are muddy. Frankly I'd rather have them knock the dirt off inside the front door on my inexpensive rug than in my rooms and on my towels.
As a guest, I would not be very happy to be required to remove my shoes at the front door - and if I knew in advance I would be asked to, I would not book a room there. I broke my ankle badly several years ago and have sciatica affecting my other leg. My physical therapist recommended that I wear sneakers with good ankle support all the time, if possible. I'm not crazy about walking around unfamiliar territory with no shoes or in slippers that are not supportive..
I would imagine it's a nice courtesy for outdoor folks (hikers & bicyclists) to take their shoes off. These old floors here clean up pretty good. I have guest slippers in the rooms for anyone who wants to walk around in those in the guest rooms instead of their bare or stockinged feet. :)
 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

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Unless it is a spa, then I would remove my shoes and expect a pedicure!. I have never been to a spa, so do not even know what one is like!
 

happyjacks

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It is customary in this area to remove your shoes indoors. This applies to homes, of course, but also to some businesses.
No one removes their shoes to enter a retail store or a restaurant (with the exception of some upscale Japanese restaurants); but it is fairly common to see in professional offices (doctor, optometrist, dentist, lawyer) and in-home businesses (bookkeeper, hair stylist). It has nothing to do with whether someone is a paying customer. It is simply considered good manners.
Here, when guests come in for breakfast, most remove their shoes. For the ones who don't, I only ask them to remove them if they are muddy/wet/snowy. If they're pretty much dry, it's no big deal. I have washable slippers available in a basket if guests want to use them.
In the winter, I include a line in my confirmation email suggesting guests bring indoor shoes or slippers to wear when dining. Most people wouldn't want to wear big bulky boots during a whole meal anyway--it's not comfortable.
April, if it is the custom where YOU are to remove shoes indoors, then go ahead and ask people to. Maybe offer a basket of slippers with a little note explaining it is customary. If you have guests from areas where it is not common, let them experience some of your culture.
 

ginocat

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I have a 'no outside shoe' policy. I do provide something for them to wear indoors. It's common in Canada to remove shoes.
 

gillumhouse

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I had an aunt who required removal of shoes at the door. She was a "clean nut" and we respected her wishes in her house and loved her enough to go visit her. However....
DH cannot walk without his shoes on. I would not go to a B & B where I had to take my shoes off. I do not go shoeless in a hotel and would not expect to be expected to in a B & B.
I have a "hedgehog" on the front porch by the door and most guests are polite enough to remove the excess whatever on the bristles of the hedgehog. I am on a rail-trail. I do overnight stabling. As long as they keep their shoes off my BEDS and on the floor, I am happy. I clean the floors - that is my job! I am not about to ASK a guest to remove shoes but do admit to being grateful to the stable people who change shoes on the porch as many do - change, not remove.
Sorry this is one that bugs me - and I have a friend who comes regularly for holidays and ALWAYS changes to slippers on arrival even when told that is not necessary, required, or desired.
Do those who require removal of shoes wax their floors? I do not wax, but slipping or tripping because shoe were not in place is an issue I prefer to not have to deal with. In an old house, one never knows when an odd nail or splinter is going to decide to say hello. I, in addition to beiieving shoes are meant to protect feet, do not want that liability issue.
 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

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I think it is funny that the title of this thread is "OUTDOOR SHOES" isn't that why we wear them in the first place?
We removed our shoes at our old house (in the country), but never expected any guest to. Of course they usually would when they saw a pile of shoes outside the door.
We also sold that house 9 years later with the carpet in perfect condition - minus a couple cat vomitting episodes, and we had young children. No we didn't clean the carpets other than spot cleaning cat barf, we vacuumed and took care of the place.
On the same token - we installed commercial grade wool carpet - which was costlier and stands up better. Even the stairs that were fully carpet didn't show wear and tear.
But here - this old beater - I mean historic home, has a long long history or what went on before us...and will continue when we are gone. "Let them wear shoes" I say. Especially those with stinky feet!
 

happyjacks

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I had an aunt who required removal of shoes at the door. She was a "clean nut" and we respected her wishes in her house and loved her enough to go visit her. However....
DH cannot walk without his shoes on. I would not go to a B & B where I had to take my shoes off. I do not go shoeless in a hotel and would not expect to be expected to in a B & B.
I have a "hedgehog" on the front porch by the door and most guests are polite enough to remove the excess whatever on the bristles of the hedgehog. I am on a rail-trail. I do overnight stabling. As long as they keep their shoes off my BEDS and on the floor, I am happy. I clean the floors - that is my job! I am not about to ASK a guest to remove shoes but do admit to being grateful to the stable people who change shoes on the porch as many do - change, not remove.
Sorry this is one that bugs me - and I have a friend who comes regularly for holidays and ALWAYS changes to slippers on arrival even when told that is not necessary, required, or desired.
Do those who require removal of shoes wax their floors? I do not wax, but slipping or tripping because shoe were not in place is an issue I prefer to not have to deal with. In an old house, one never knows when an odd nail or splinter is going to decide to say hello. I, in addition to beiieving shoes are meant to protect feet, do not want that liability issue..
gillumhouse said:
I would not go to a B & B where I had to take my shoes off. I do not go shoeless in a hotel and would not expect to be expected to in a B & B.
If you find yourself traveling to a place where it's a common courtesy to remove your shoes, simply bring 'indoor shoes' with you (relatively clean & dry shoes will do) to wear indoors. It might be unfamiliar to you, but it's not a big deal.
As we say so very often on this forum.... we're not a hotel!

 

seashanty

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i don't ask but sometimes want to ... the mud and yuck that comes in is appalling sometimes. especially in the grooves of boots and sneakers ... all stuck in those little crevices on the bottoms.
it's not my wood floors i worry about so much, it's the light colored (yes, light colored) carpeting in many of the guestrooms and also the putting up of shoed feet (shod feet?) on foot rests, ottomons and on beds.
 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

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I had an aunt who required removal of shoes at the door. She was a "clean nut" and we respected her wishes in her house and loved her enough to go visit her. However....
DH cannot walk without his shoes on. I would not go to a B & B where I had to take my shoes off. I do not go shoeless in a hotel and would not expect to be expected to in a B & B.
I have a "hedgehog" on the front porch by the door and most guests are polite enough to remove the excess whatever on the bristles of the hedgehog. I am on a rail-trail. I do overnight stabling. As long as they keep their shoes off my BEDS and on the floor, I am happy. I clean the floors - that is my job! I am not about to ASK a guest to remove shoes but do admit to being grateful to the stable people who change shoes on the porch as many do - change, not remove.
Sorry this is one that bugs me - and I have a friend who comes regularly for holidays and ALWAYS changes to slippers on arrival even when told that is not necessary, required, or desired.
Do those who require removal of shoes wax their floors? I do not wax, but slipping or tripping because shoe were not in place is an issue I prefer to not have to deal with. In an old house, one never knows when an odd nail or splinter is going to decide to say hello. I, in addition to beiieving shoes are meant to protect feet, do not want that liability issue..
gillumhouse said:
I would not go to a B & B where I had to take my shoes off. I do not go shoeless in a hotel and would not expect to be expected to in a B & B.
If you find yourself traveling to a place where it's a common courtesy to remove your shoes, simply bring 'indoor shoes' with you (relatively clean & dry shoes will do) to wear indoors. It might be unfamiliar to you, but it's not a big deal.
As we say so very often on this forum.... we're not a hotel!

.
happyjacks said:
gillumhouse said:
I would not go to a B & B where I had to take my shoes off. I do not go shoeless in a hotel and would not expect to be expected to in a B & B.
If you find yourself traveling to a place where it's a common courtesy to remove your shoes, simply bring 'indoor shoes' with you (relatively clean & dry shoes will do) to wear indoors. It might be unfamiliar to you, but it's not a big deal.
As we say so very often on this forum.... we're not a hotel!
It is common in Queensland Australia as there is a high Asian population.
 

stephanie

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Oh, this is one of the things I know I am going to have to get over, and fast. I have a friend who, no matter how many times I've asked her to remove her shoes when she enters my home in the winter or if there are shoes by the door, will march in with salt, mud and snow still attached and put her feet up on my leather sofa. Makes me stiffen up and cringe every time and DH just laughs at me.
 

happyjacks

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I had an aunt who required removal of shoes at the door. She was a "clean nut" and we respected her wishes in her house and loved her enough to go visit her. However....
DH cannot walk without his shoes on. I would not go to a B & B where I had to take my shoes off. I do not go shoeless in a hotel and would not expect to be expected to in a B & B.
I have a "hedgehog" on the front porch by the door and most guests are polite enough to remove the excess whatever on the bristles of the hedgehog. I am on a rail-trail. I do overnight stabling. As long as they keep their shoes off my BEDS and on the floor, I am happy. I clean the floors - that is my job! I am not about to ASK a guest to remove shoes but do admit to being grateful to the stable people who change shoes on the porch as many do - change, not remove.
Sorry this is one that bugs me - and I have a friend who comes regularly for holidays and ALWAYS changes to slippers on arrival even when told that is not necessary, required, or desired.
Do those who require removal of shoes wax their floors? I do not wax, but slipping or tripping because shoe were not in place is an issue I prefer to not have to deal with. In an old house, one never knows when an odd nail or splinter is going to decide to say hello. I, in addition to beiieving shoes are meant to protect feet, do not want that liability issue..
gillumhouse said:
I would not go to a B & B where I had to take my shoes off. I do not go shoeless in a hotel and would not expect to be expected to in a B & B.
If you find yourself traveling to a place where it's a common courtesy to remove your shoes, simply bring 'indoor shoes' with you (relatively clean & dry shoes will do) to wear indoors. It might be unfamiliar to you, but it's not a big deal.
As we say so very often on this forum.... we're not a hotel!

.
happyjacks said:
gillumhouse said:
I would not go to a B & B where I had to take my shoes off. I do not go shoeless in a hotel and would not expect to be expected to in a B & B.
If you find yourself traveling to a place where it's a common courtesy to remove your shoes, simply bring 'indoor shoes' with you (relatively clean & dry shoes will do) to wear indoors. It might be unfamiliar to you, but it's not a big deal.
As we say so very often on this forum.... we're not a hotel!
It is common in Queensland Australia as there is a high Asian population.
.
Different strokes for different folks... It's what makes travel interesting!
 

JunieBJones (JBJ)

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Oh, this is one of the things I know I am going to have to get over, and fast. I have a friend who, no matter how many times I've asked her to remove her shoes when she enters my home in the winter or if there are shoes by the door, will march in with salt, mud and snow still attached and put her feet up on my leather sofa. Makes me stiffen up and cringe every time and DH just laughs at me..
stephanie said:
Oh, this is one of the things I know I am going to have to get over, and fast. I have a friend who, no matter how many times I've asked her to remove her shoes when she enters my home in the winter or if there are shoes by the door, will march in with salt, mud and snow still attached and put her feet up on my leather sofa. Makes me stiffen up and cringe every time and DH just laughs at me.
Maybe she has bunions and is embarrassed. Honestly, if someone doesn't wish to, then that needs to be respected. Feet can be pretty ugly sometimes.
But on the same token she needs to respect YOUR place and not track mud and her big old bunions all over your leather sofa!
 
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