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"Photoshopping" B&B photos

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JBloggs

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I was adding a special to a directory and saw a B&B with an aurora borealis looking sky over the Inn. It actually made me chuckle and I wondered if guests expect to find the Northern Lights each time they stay there? (and no it was not in Alaska, it was in the midAtlantic.) Then I noticed one of the rotating photos had a different breakfast plate/meal at each setting. This also caught my attention as it looked so inconsistent, do guests expect to order whichever meal appeals to them each morning?
I wonder if this is another case of little nephew Jimmy making the website look good? Or perhaps there is a big apartment complex hovering over the B&B so they photoshopped it out?
 

Innkeeper To Go

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Joey Bloggs said:
I was adding a special to a directory and saw a B&B with an aurora borealis looking sky over the Inn. It actually made me chuckle and I wondered if guests expect to find the Northern Lights each time they stay there? (and no it was not in Alaska, it was in the midAtlantic.)
I'll have to say that would seem to imply that they would see the northern lights, wouldn't it?
Why would someone want their area to appear any different than it is? Isn't it just common sense to show your own inn and area in its own best light?
 

Morticia

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I've seen some Photoshopped photos that were a marked improvement on what was really there. In one case, the inn was in the process of being painted and the photos showed the 'after' even tho they were taken before. Another took the power lines out of the photo to make the house look better. Totally ok with me as I wouldn't care about power lines (unless they were the ultra high voltage ones that hum).
Others just corrected lighting or took out a dead shrub or colored in a brown lawn.
(Or, removed an intrusive sign, thank you!)
How about when seashanty had that hair dryer on the wall that CT took out? That was a wonderful change and not much 'lost' in the guest's appreciation of the room.
I think showing a different breakfast at each place setting if you're not actually going to serve that is misleading. But, I think one of us on here had something like that, too. So maybe they could pipe in why.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I've seen some Photoshopped photos that were a marked improvement on what was really there. In one case, the inn was in the process of being painted and the photos showed the 'after' even tho they were taken before. Another took the power lines out of the photo to make the house look better. Totally ok with me as I wouldn't care about power lines (unless they were the ultra high voltage ones that hum).
Others just corrected lighting or took out a dead shrub or colored in a brown lawn.
(Or, removed an intrusive sign, thank you!)
How about when seashanty had that hair dryer on the wall that CT took out? That was a wonderful change and not much 'lost' in the guest's appreciation of the room.
I think showing a different breakfast at each place setting if you're not actually going to serve that is misleading. But, I think one of us on here had something like that, too. So maybe they could pipe in why..
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
 

JBloggs

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I've seen some Photoshopped photos that were a marked improvement on what was really there. In one case, the inn was in the process of being painted and the photos showed the 'after' even tho they were taken before. Another took the power lines out of the photo to make the house look better. Totally ok with me as I wouldn't care about power lines (unless they were the ultra high voltage ones that hum).
Others just corrected lighting or took out a dead shrub or colored in a brown lawn.
(Or, removed an intrusive sign, thank you!)
How about when seashanty had that hair dryer on the wall that CT took out? That was a wonderful change and not much 'lost' in the guest's appreciation of the room.
I think showing a different breakfast at each place setting if you're not actually going to serve that is misleading. But, I think one of us on here had something like that, too. So maybe they could pipe in why..
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
Sure nothing wrong with removing a cable running to the house and such. :) Or if by chance there happens one in a million year meteor shower - then by all means post a pic and say what it is!
And if there is some building next door we don't need to show-we aren't paying to market the place next door. So I agree this should be minimalized. As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I've seen some Photoshopped photos that were a marked improvement on what was really there. In one case, the inn was in the process of being painted and the photos showed the 'after' even tho they were taken before. Another took the power lines out of the photo to make the house look better. Totally ok with me as I wouldn't care about power lines (unless they were the ultra high voltage ones that hum).
Others just corrected lighting or took out a dead shrub or colored in a brown lawn.
(Or, removed an intrusive sign, thank you!)
How about when seashanty had that hair dryer on the wall that CT took out? That was a wonderful change and not much 'lost' in the guest's appreciation of the room.
I think showing a different breakfast at each place setting if you're not actually going to serve that is misleading. But, I think one of us on here had something like that, too. So maybe they could pipe in why..
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
Sure nothing wrong with removing a cable running to the house and such. :) Or if by chance there happens one in a million year meteor shower - then by all means post a pic and say what it is!
And if there is some building next door we don't need to show-we aren't paying to market the place next door. So I agree this should be minimalized. As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
I agree that the color shouldn't be so different as to be unrecognizable. But I've seen some lovely inn photos in sepia tone that I think really reflected the atmosphere of the place very well.
To me that's what it all comes down to. Does the photo realistically reflect what the guest is going to get? If it does, I'm all for it, however that's interpreted artistically.
 

Boomer

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I've seen some Photoshopped photos that were a marked improvement on what was really there. In one case, the inn was in the process of being painted and the photos showed the 'after' even tho they were taken before. Another took the power lines out of the photo to make the house look better. Totally ok with me as I wouldn't care about power lines (unless they were the ultra high voltage ones that hum).
Others just corrected lighting or took out a dead shrub or colored in a brown lawn.
(Or, removed an intrusive sign, thank you!)
How about when seashanty had that hair dryer on the wall that CT took out? That was a wonderful change and not much 'lost' in the guest's appreciation of the room.
I think showing a different breakfast at each place setting if you're not actually going to serve that is misleading. But, I think one of us on here had something like that, too. So maybe they could pipe in why..
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
Sure nothing wrong with removing a cable running to the house and such. :) Or if by chance there happens one in a million year meteor shower - then by all means post a pic and say what it is!
And if there is some building next door we don't need to show-we aren't paying to market the place next door. So I agree this should be minimalized. As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
I agree that the color shouldn't be so different as to be unrecognizable. But I've seen some lovely inn photos in sepia tone that I think really reflected the atmosphere of the place very well.
To me that's what it all comes down to. Does the photo realistically reflect what the guest is going to get? If it does, I'm all for it, however that's interpreted artistically.
.
My most important comments from arriving guests, "You Inn is what we saw on your websirt" we have stayed at other Hotels that look nothing like thier pictures. We must be true to the B&B/Inn spirit - "I am what I am' and tha's what I am" good or bad, they picked your location, never have to explain the false puictures good or bad.
 

JBloggs

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I've seen some Photoshopped photos that were a marked improvement on what was really there. In one case, the inn was in the process of being painted and the photos showed the 'after' even tho they were taken before. Another took the power lines out of the photo to make the house look better. Totally ok with me as I wouldn't care about power lines (unless they were the ultra high voltage ones that hum).
Others just corrected lighting or took out a dead shrub or colored in a brown lawn.
(Or, removed an intrusive sign, thank you!)
How about when seashanty had that hair dryer on the wall that CT took out? That was a wonderful change and not much 'lost' in the guest's appreciation of the room.
I think showing a different breakfast at each place setting if you're not actually going to serve that is misleading. But, I think one of us on here had something like that, too. So maybe they could pipe in why..
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
Sure nothing wrong with removing a cable running to the house and such. :) Or if by chance there happens one in a million year meteor shower - then by all means post a pic and say what it is!
And if there is some building next door we don't need to show-we aren't paying to market the place next door. So I agree this should be minimalized. As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
I agree that the color shouldn't be so different as to be unrecognizable. But I've seen some lovely inn photos in sepia tone that I think really reflected the atmosphere of the place very well.
To me that's what it all comes down to. Does the photo realistically reflect what the guest is going to get? If it does, I'm all for it, however that's interpreted artistically.
.
Okay back to my original post, to use the word "photoshopping" means not correcting the image,and not making it a sepia tone or enhancing, but means alter it more falsely. ie Northern lights from Mississippi. :)
 

Morticia

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I've seen some Photoshopped photos that were a marked improvement on what was really there. In one case, the inn was in the process of being painted and the photos showed the 'after' even tho they were taken before. Another took the power lines out of the photo to make the house look better. Totally ok with me as I wouldn't care about power lines (unless they were the ultra high voltage ones that hum).
Others just corrected lighting or took out a dead shrub or colored in a brown lawn.
(Or, removed an intrusive sign, thank you!)
How about when seashanty had that hair dryer on the wall that CT took out? That was a wonderful change and not much 'lost' in the guest's appreciation of the room.
I think showing a different breakfast at each place setting if you're not actually going to serve that is misleading. But, I think one of us on here had something like that, too. So maybe they could pipe in why..
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
Sure nothing wrong with removing a cable running to the house and such. :) Or if by chance there happens one in a million year meteor shower - then by all means post a pic and say what it is!
And if there is some building next door we don't need to show-we aren't paying to market the place next door. So I agree this should be minimalized. As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
I agree that the color shouldn't be so different as to be unrecognizable. But I've seen some lovely inn photos in sepia tone that I think really reflected the atmosphere of the place very well.
To me that's what it all comes down to. Does the photo realistically reflect what the guest is going to get? If it does, I'm all for it, however that's interpreted artistically.
.
Okay back to my original post, to use the word "photoshopping" means not correcting the image,and not making it a sepia tone or enhancing, but means alter it more falsely. ie Northern lights from Mississippi. :)
.
Joey Bloggs said:
Okay back to my original post, to use the word "photoshopping" means not correcting the image,and not making it a sepia tone or enhancing, but means alter it more falsely. ie Northern lights from Mississippi. :)
Ah. Gotcha. Photoshopping in the pejorative.
 

seashanty

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i think showing the northern lights is crazy silly.
do you remember when i used a template for my first website that had a beach on it. i thought it was pretty. first call that asked 'can we see that view from any of the guestrooms?' i had to take it down!!! no ... no beach view from where i was! people are very, very visual and you find that out fast.
 

JBloggs

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i think showing the northern lights is crazy silly.
do you remember when i used a template for my first website that had a beach on it. i thought it was pretty. first call that asked 'can we see that view from any of the guestrooms?' i had to take it down!!! no ... no beach view from where i was! people are very, very visual and you find that out fast..
seashanty said:
i think showing the northern lights is crazy silly.
do you remember when i used a template for my first website that had a beach on it. i thought it was pretty. first call that asked 'can we see that view from any of the guestrooms?' i had to take it down!!! no ... no beach view from where i was! people are very, very visual and you find that out fast.
Yes I recall that. I also took off all reference to views from our website, even though right now out my window there is a view - but when the leaves are in it is only visible from one side of the porch. Had one irate guest say "Where are the views" oh, and one room, the room on that SW corner of the house - you can look out for miles. (Sheesh I reread what I typed and made no sense, typing in between guests, shouldn't do that, but I do!)
 

Copperhead

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I've seen some Photoshopped photos that were a marked improvement on what was really there. In one case, the inn was in the process of being painted and the photos showed the 'after' even tho they were taken before. Another took the power lines out of the photo to make the house look better. Totally ok with me as I wouldn't care about power lines (unless they were the ultra high voltage ones that hum).
Others just corrected lighting or took out a dead shrub or colored in a brown lawn.
(Or, removed an intrusive sign, thank you!)
How about when seashanty had that hair dryer on the wall that CT took out? That was a wonderful change and not much 'lost' in the guest's appreciation of the room.
I think showing a different breakfast at each place setting if you're not actually going to serve that is misleading. But, I think one of us on here had something like that, too. So maybe they could pipe in why..
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
Sure nothing wrong with removing a cable running to the house and such. :) Or if by chance there happens one in a million year meteor shower - then by all means post a pic and say what it is!
And if there is some building next door we don't need to show-we aren't paying to market the place next door. So I agree this should be minimalized. As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
I agree that the color shouldn't be so different as to be unrecognizable. But I've seen some lovely inn photos in sepia tone that I think really reflected the atmosphere of the place very well.
To me that's what it all comes down to. Does the photo realistically reflect what the guest is going to get? If it does, I'm all for it, however that's interpreted artistically.
.
My most important comments from arriving guests, "You Inn is what we saw on your websirt" we have stayed at other Hotels that look nothing like thier pictures. We must be true to the B&B/Inn spirit - "I am what I am' and tha's what I am" good or bad, they picked your location, never have to explain the false puictures good or bad.
.
Boomer said:
My most important comments from arriving guests, "You Inn is what we saw on your websirt" we have stayed at other Hotels that look nothing like thier pictures. We must be true to the B&B/Inn spirit - "I am what I am' and tha's what I am" good or bad, they picked your location, never have to explain the false puictures good or bad.
I think that is the most important thing we can do, and anything else will be obvious to guests once they arrive.
I wouldn't have a problem removing a power line or 'minimizing' a building next door but to remove the building is misleading. Case in point: had some guests come stay with us after checking out of their neighboring big city B&B. They stated they felt slighted by the misrepresentation of that B&B on the web and requested their money (was prepaid) back and left. The picture as they descibed it (and I looked later) showed the B&B with nothing around it but trees and green grass. When they arrived, they noticed buildings on either side that as they stated "we could have shaken our neighbors hands through the windows" they were so close. They wanted space, they got it here.
 

Morticia

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I've seen some Photoshopped photos that were a marked improvement on what was really there. In one case, the inn was in the process of being painted and the photos showed the 'after' even tho they were taken before. Another took the power lines out of the photo to make the house look better. Totally ok with me as I wouldn't care about power lines (unless they were the ultra high voltage ones that hum).
Others just corrected lighting or took out a dead shrub or colored in a brown lawn.
(Or, removed an intrusive sign, thank you!)
How about when seashanty had that hair dryer on the wall that CT took out? That was a wonderful change and not much 'lost' in the guest's appreciation of the room.
I think showing a different breakfast at each place setting if you're not actually going to serve that is misleading. But, I think one of us on here had something like that, too. So maybe they could pipe in why..
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
Sure nothing wrong with removing a cable running to the house and such. :) Or if by chance there happens one in a million year meteor shower - then by all means post a pic and say what it is!
And if there is some building next door we don't need to show-we aren't paying to market the place next door. So I agree this should be minimalized. As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
I agree that the color shouldn't be so different as to be unrecognizable. But I've seen some lovely inn photos in sepia tone that I think really reflected the atmosphere of the place very well.
To me that's what it all comes down to. Does the photo realistically reflect what the guest is going to get? If it does, I'm all for it, however that's interpreted artistically.
.
My most important comments from arriving guests, "You Inn is what we saw on your websirt" we have stayed at other Hotels that look nothing like thier pictures. We must be true to the B&B/Inn spirit - "I am what I am' and tha's what I am" good or bad, they picked your location, never have to explain the false puictures good or bad.
.
Boomer said:
My most important comments from arriving guests, "You Inn is what we saw on your websirt" we have stayed at other Hotels that look nothing like thier pictures. We must be true to the B&B/Inn spirit - "I am what I am' and tha's what I am" good or bad, they picked your location, never have to explain the false puictures good or bad.
I think that is the most important thing we can do, and anything else will be obvious to guests once they arrive.
I wouldn't have a problem removing a power line or 'minimizing' a building next door but to remove the building is misleading. Case in point: had some guests come stay with us after checking out of their neighboring big city B&B. They stated they felt slighted by the misrepresentation of that B&B on the web and requested their money (was prepaid) back and left. The picture as they descibed it (and I looked later) showed the B&B with nothing around it but trees and green grass. When they arrived, they noticed buildings on either side that as they stated "we could have shaken our neighbors hands through the windows" they were so close. They wanted space, they got it here.
.
I get creative with the camera when taking pix here. I have a HUGE lawn on ONE side of the building. The other side is a driveway and another building. A lot of guests think we're out of town with all that lawn.
 

Copperhead

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I've seen some Photoshopped photos that were a marked improvement on what was really there. In one case, the inn was in the process of being painted and the photos showed the 'after' even tho they were taken before. Another took the power lines out of the photo to make the house look better. Totally ok with me as I wouldn't care about power lines (unless they were the ultra high voltage ones that hum).
Others just corrected lighting or took out a dead shrub or colored in a brown lawn.
(Or, removed an intrusive sign, thank you!)
How about when seashanty had that hair dryer on the wall that CT took out? That was a wonderful change and not much 'lost' in the guest's appreciation of the room.
I think showing a different breakfast at each place setting if you're not actually going to serve that is misleading. But, I think one of us on here had something like that, too. So maybe they could pipe in why..
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
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Innkeeper To Go said:
Since DH is a photographer, trust me, I'm really not opposed to photoshopping. It has its place and the work done in a digital darkroom as is important as the work done in a real darkroom.
But when an inn that's not in range of the northern lights looks like it has them over its skies, well, to me, that's going too far.
Sure, correct errors. Clean up some messes, wires, whatever. But guests do have a right, I think, to know what they're getting and the photos should show them that. IMHO.
Sure nothing wrong with removing a cable running to the house and such. :) Or if by chance there happens one in a million year meteor shower - then by all means post a pic and say what it is!
And if there is some building next door we don't need to show-we aren't paying to market the place next door. So I agree this should be minimalized. As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
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Joey Bloggs said:
As long as we are not changing the aesthetics of the B&B itself. If it looks photoshopped, then that is where the line is drawn, imo. Too blue, too green, unless of course they want it to look watercolored.
I agree that the color shouldn't be so different as to be unrecognizable. But I've seen some lovely inn photos in sepia tone that I think really reflected the atmosphere of the place very well.
To me that's what it all comes down to. Does the photo realistically reflect what the guest is going to get? If it does, I'm all for it, however that's interpreted artistically.
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My most important comments from arriving guests, "You Inn is what we saw on your websirt" we have stayed at other Hotels that look nothing like thier pictures. We must be true to the B&B/Inn spirit - "I am what I am' and tha's what I am" good or bad, they picked your location, never have to explain the false puictures good or bad.
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Boomer said:
My most important comments from arriving guests, "You Inn is what we saw on your websirt" we have stayed at other Hotels that look nothing like thier pictures. We must be true to the B&B/Inn spirit - "I am what I am' and tha's what I am" good or bad, they picked your location, never have to explain the false puictures good or bad.
I think that is the most important thing we can do, and anything else will be obvious to guests once they arrive.
I wouldn't have a problem removing a power line or 'minimizing' a building next door but to remove the building is misleading. Case in point: had some guests come stay with us after checking out of their neighboring big city B&B. They stated they felt slighted by the misrepresentation of that B&B on the web and requested their money (was prepaid) back and left. The picture as they descibed it (and I looked later) showed the B&B with nothing around it but trees and green grass. When they arrived, they noticed buildings on either side that as they stated "we could have shaken our neighbors hands through the windows" they were so close. They wanted space, they got it here.
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I get creative with the camera when taking pix here. I have a HUGE lawn on ONE side of the building. The other side is a driveway and another building. A lot of guests think we're out of town with all that lawn.
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I think we all put our best foot forward so to speak and should. It is when by doing so that you alter reality that it may actually hurt you rather than help you. (as in my example, that B&B has homes on either side of them, so close that you could - well almost, shake hands through the windows)
(a little off topic) I do think though at times some guests draw their own conclusions on a place by what they see on the site - could be a picture, the name, the city name, etc. We can not control what people drum up as long as we are openly not forcing that conclusion upon them. (as in the northern lights sky in MS)
 

seashanty

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i think showing the northern lights is crazy silly.
do you remember when i used a template for my first website that had a beach on it. i thought it was pretty. first call that asked 'can we see that view from any of the guestrooms?' i had to take it down!!! no ... no beach view from where i was! people are very, very visual and you find that out fast..
seashanty said:
i think showing the northern lights is crazy silly.
do you remember when i used a template for my first website that had a beach on it. i thought it was pretty. first call that asked 'can we see that view from any of the guestrooms?' i had to take it down!!! no ... no beach view from where i was! people are very, very visual and you find that out fast.
Yes I recall that. I also took off all reference to views from our website, even though right now out my window there is a view - but when the leaves are in it is only visible from one side of the porch. Had one irate guest say "Where are the views" oh, and one room, the room on that SW corner of the house - you can look out for miles. (Sheesh I reread what I typed and made no sense, typing in between guests, shouldn't do that, but I do!)
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that template had a picture along the left on the top ... it was where you put your site name or a logo ... and i didn't think much of it til a guest asked about the ocean view. we had a harbor view, a really rustic one, and i had to quick get real pictures.
as for the hair dryer, we actually moved it to another location because i hated the look of the cord which i hadn't really thought about 'til i saw it in the picture. much nicer without. although it was hard to patch the holes in the old wall from the dryer mount.
i have been to places and thought 'is this the place i saw online?' i remember one place i asked the innkeepers 'can we see mount m from here?' which is what it said on the website ... 'enjoy gorgeous views of mount m from our windows.' because i could only see a road from my room, and a pretty little back yard from the breakfast room, and another road from the common area. walking around outside, i couldn't see the mountain. on the website there were pictures taken of the mountain with a super zoom lens i guess ... but from where? so they took me up to the third floor. at the end of a corridor, past the 'private' innkeeper quarters, across from a broom closet were two windows, side by side. and they pointed ... on a clear day, you could, indeed, see mount m. and probably from 'our windows' meaning the innkeepers' bedroom windows.

 

JBloggs

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And yet, if we want to promote the AREA we should have some sort of gallery or slide show and/or links to things in the area. So the line for some is DO we promote JUST the B&B and not the area? By this I mean, just a few links to sights of interest only.
Or do we promote the area more...if it is a recreational type place, water, beaches, scenery... We all have to decide what we feel is important for our guests and to draw our guests to us. I like to advertise the beauty that surrounds us here - not in this town, but all around this town. I always like others to enjoy what I enjoy. I find some things interesting that some might not, like talk of the lobster shacks where you sit on a picnic table with bin at the end for the remnants, THAT to me is ten times more interesting than a fine dining meal that could be shattered by poor service. Outside. Scenery. Food.
 

Morticia

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And yet, if we want to promote the AREA we should have some sort of gallery or slide show and/or links to things in the area. So the line for some is DO we promote JUST the B&B and not the area? By this I mean, just a few links to sights of interest only.
Or do we promote the area more...if it is a recreational type place, water, beaches, scenery... We all have to decide what we feel is important for our guests and to draw our guests to us. I like to advertise the beauty that surrounds us here - not in this town, but all around this town. I always like others to enjoy what I enjoy. I find some things interesting that some might not, like talk of the lobster shacks where you sit on a picnic table with bin at the end for the remnants, THAT to me is ten times more interesting than a fine dining meal that could be shattered by poor service. Outside. Scenery. Food.
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First, promote the B&B. Second promote the area. By that I mean- if your B&B isn't on the beach, lake, foot of the mountains, waterfall, etc it shouldn't be the focus of your homepage. But it should be plainly evident that these things are close by. If your place IS on one of those features, promote the heck out of it. And promote it seasonally.
Getting cutesy with the wording is bound to fail as well. My town is one the water, I'm not. I try to not have those two ideas in the same sentence. But I DO want guests to know there are beaches here. I do mention there is a car drive involved with getting to the water. I've seen other B&B 'copy' that pretty much says 'we're on the water' because of the way they got creative with the grammar and the juxtaposition of the words 'town,' 'waterfront,' and 'B&B.' NOT a good idea.
 

Copperhead

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And yet, if we want to promote the AREA we should have some sort of gallery or slide show and/or links to things in the area. So the line for some is DO we promote JUST the B&B and not the area? By this I mean, just a few links to sights of interest only.
Or do we promote the area more...if it is a recreational type place, water, beaches, scenery... We all have to decide what we feel is important for our guests and to draw our guests to us. I like to advertise the beauty that surrounds us here - not in this town, but all around this town. I always like others to enjoy what I enjoy. I find some things interesting that some might not, like talk of the lobster shacks where you sit on a picnic table with bin at the end for the remnants, THAT to me is ten times more interesting than a fine dining meal that could be shattered by poor service. Outside. Scenery. Food.
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I agree JB that it is important to tell the whole story and we should be ambassators for our area. For those that have it all on site, they only need to promote themselves, but for the rest of us, we should promote the things that make coming here so enjoyable and that includes things in our area.
I have a page devoted to things to do in the area. I start with lists of things close by and then areas further away, up to about a 1 1/2 hr drive as I do have people use us as a regional home base and take day trips. This has been a very highly ranked page of our website and how many find or finalize us as their B&B choice.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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And yet, if we want to promote the AREA we should have some sort of gallery or slide show and/or links to things in the area. So the line for some is DO we promote JUST the B&B and not the area? By this I mean, just a few links to sights of interest only.
Or do we promote the area more...if it is a recreational type place, water, beaches, scenery... We all have to decide what we feel is important for our guests and to draw our guests to us. I like to advertise the beauty that surrounds us here - not in this town, but all around this town. I always like others to enjoy what I enjoy. I find some things interesting that some might not, like talk of the lobster shacks where you sit on a picnic table with bin at the end for the remnants, THAT to me is ten times more interesting than a fine dining meal that could be shattered by poor service. Outside. Scenery. Food.
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Absolutely promote the area. Guests are looking for an excuse to come visit your area. Give 'em one!
 
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