Quantcast

Rearranging guestrooms

INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources

Help Support INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources:

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
I'm putting the rooms back together and have always wanted to rearrange this one room. More to see if a king bed would fit (it won't). Well, now the dilemma...this room has 2 beds, one queen and one twin. It is a high occupancy room for many reasons including the second bed. After moving the furniture around I realized I liked it better the new way because it appears there is more space in the room and because the queen bed now has a great view out the only window. However, the twin bed is now a bit cramped in its new corner of the room.
So, given your druthers as a guest, would you like a nice morning view of the outside world from your bed, or does it not make a difference? (What you see...the trees and the church across the street.)
Holding me back from leaving it this way is all of the repair work that will need to be done to move light fixtures off walls and to rehang the 'valet' which is the only place in the room to hang clothes.
 

gillumhouse

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Supporting Member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
15,520
Reaction score
84
Who would be in the twin bed? An adult? A child? I think I would do the room for the occupants of the queen bed pleasure and I think a nice morning view would be pleasant. Sorry about the repair work....
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Who would be in the twin bed? An adult? A child? I think I would do the room for the occupants of the queen bed pleasure and I think a nice morning view would be pleasant. Sorry about the repair work.....
Twin bed could be anyone...spouse, kid, friend, teen. If I move everything back the way it was THAT bed has the view.
Here's the other thing, now that I'm thinking about it...this room can be made into a suite. The way I have it now, if it is a suite, the 2 queen beds would be looking right at each other if they kept the connecting doors open. Of course, they can close the doors if that's a problem. But, in a lot of cases, it would be an asset, as when friends book this and they want to chat all night. They could sit in bed and see each other.
 

Copperhead

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
5,969
Reaction score
0
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
.
Same versatility...the 2 beds have always been in the room. I think that's what you were referring to.
 

Willowpondgj

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 6, 2008
Messages
571
Reaction score
0
Who would be in the twin bed? An adult? A child? I think I would do the room for the occupants of the queen bed pleasure and I think a nice morning view would be pleasant. Sorry about the repair work.....
Twin bed could be anyone...spouse, kid, friend, teen. If I move everything back the way it was THAT bed has the view.
Here's the other thing, now that I'm thinking about it...this room can be made into a suite. The way I have it now, if it is a suite, the 2 queen beds would be looking right at each other if they kept the connecting doors open. Of course, they can close the doors if that's a problem. But, in a lot of cases, it would be an asset, as when friends book this and they want to chat all night. They could sit in bed and see each other.
.
Would their feet be facing the doors in each end of the suite? If so, bad Feng Shui...(Or so I read today...no feet facing the entrance to the bedroom door while sleeping, because supposedly you go out feet first on the stretcher when you die...) But I guess then it really wouldn't matter!

 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Who would be in the twin bed? An adult? A child? I think I would do the room for the occupants of the queen bed pleasure and I think a nice morning view would be pleasant. Sorry about the repair work.....
Twin bed could be anyone...spouse, kid, friend, teen. If I move everything back the way it was THAT bed has the view.
Here's the other thing, now that I'm thinking about it...this room can be made into a suite. The way I have it now, if it is a suite, the 2 queen beds would be looking right at each other if they kept the connecting doors open. Of course, they can close the doors if that's a problem. But, in a lot of cases, it would be an asset, as when friends book this and they want to chat all night. They could sit in bed and see each other.
.
Would their feet be facing the doors in each end of the suite? If so, bad Feng Shui...(Or so I read today...no feet facing the entrance to the bedroom door while sleeping, because supposedly you go out feet first on the stretcher when you die...) But I guess then it really wouldn't matter!

.
That must be why I don't like the twin bed where it is in the new layout. It's a tough house...doors and windows everywhere! This room has 4 doors in it. There are only 2 rooms where the layout requires feet facing door. I hate to put everything back where it was. Ugh.
How about this...I can probably put the luggage rack in the hallway now (I will remove the hope chest that was there). Would you leave your suitcase in the hallway at night if it was your own hallway, with a door at the end of it? (I could also add a latch on that doorway if it would help.)
I also don't like beds to face into the bathroom. Many guests don't close the bathroom door and that's just an ugly sight to wake up to.
 

YellowSocks

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
2,179
Reaction score
13
Guests aren't going to leave their suitcase in the hall, unless the hall has a door that makes it part of their room. (We have a room like that, but it's a dinky hall, no room for luggage there.)
Most of the guests here close their blinds and/or curtains (even if it's not needed) so they wouldn't see the view anyway.
=)
Kk.
 

GeorgiaGirl

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 9, 2008
Messages
808
Reaction score
0
Speaking for myself, I drag out of the bed when the alarm goes off, I don't look at the view! It would feel weird leaving the luggage outside the room, even if it's my own hallway. I don't unpack my suitcase when I'm staying so I would want them to be in my room.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Guests aren't going to leave their suitcase in the hall, unless the hall has a door that makes it part of their room. (We have a room like that, but it's a dinky hall, no room for luggage there.)
Most of the guests here close their blinds and/or curtains (even if it's not needed) so they wouldn't see the view anyway.
=)
Kk..
This room has its own separate hallway and stairs. No other rooms near here or on this hallway, which is more of a landing at the top of the stairs. I figured no one would leave their things outside, altho I do find shoes and assorted things kept there.
 

GeorgiaGirl

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 9, 2008
Messages
808
Reaction score
0
Yeah, I remember the hallway but not so much the room. Even though it would be my own hall it would still seem funny leaving my stuff out there....shoes, etc. I would do.
Post pictures if you do decide to change!
 

Copperhead

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
5,969
Reaction score
0
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
.
Same versatility...the 2 beds have always been in the room. I think that's what you were referring to.
.
No I was referring to being able to sell it as a 2 room suite with next room. I am assuming that the door you were referring to was a door leading directly to the next room. If I am right, the previous set up you must have had the door blocked?
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
.
Same versatility...the 2 beds have always been in the room. I think that's what you were referring to.
.
No I was referring to being able to sell it as a 2 room suite with next room. I am assuming that the door you were referring to was a door leading directly to the next room. If I am right, the previous set up you must have had the door blocked?
.
Nope, the door has always operable. Only the beds faced the same direction so if the doors were open you couldn't see the other bed from your bed (in either room).
I have a floor plan on my website that explains in pictures what I'm talking about.
 

Samster

Well-known member
Joined
May 30, 2008
Messages
6,475
Reaction score
14
Location
South Carolina
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
.
Same versatility...the 2 beds have always been in the room. I think that's what you were referring to.
.
No I was referring to being able to sell it as a 2 room suite with next room. I am assuming that the door you were referring to was a door leading directly to the next room. If I am right, the previous set up you must have had the door blocked?
.
Nope, the door has always operable. Only the beds faced the same direction so if the doors were open you couldn't see the other bed from your bed (in either room).
I have a floor plan on my website that explains in pictures what I'm talking about.
.
I guess you have to ask, "What is the optimal goal here?" Guest comfort, guest mobility in the rooms, or maximizing your bookings revenue. Then, go from there.
As a guest, I want my suitcase easily accessible to me. I think that might be true for most folks. Can you use the hallway space to free up something else in the room? An area for them to store shopping purchases or other stuff like that? Something else that they need sometimes, but not always like extra pillows or blankets? How would you use that room & hall/landing space if you were staying there (based on your history now that you know about your average guest)?
My observation here is that folks draw the drapes, wood blinds, shades, even if no one can see in their rooms and they're just sitting in there during the day when you're in an urban location. So, unless the view is of mountains or ocean or something like that, how important is it??
Funny how you can have an epiphany about how a room could be set up better....last week I just swapped a chair & desk location in one room & it makes the room look a lot bigger & I like where the chair is now in a nice cozy corner. I noticed when I was deep cleaning that you couldn't really see the TV from where the chair previously was anyway. Now, it's in a nice reading nook. Doh!

 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
.
Same versatility...the 2 beds have always been in the room. I think that's what you were referring to.
.
No I was referring to being able to sell it as a 2 room suite with next room. I am assuming that the door you were referring to was a door leading directly to the next room. If I am right, the previous set up you must have had the door blocked?
.
Nope, the door has always operable. Only the beds faced the same direction so if the doors were open you couldn't see the other bed from your bed (in either room).
I have a floor plan on my website that explains in pictures what I'm talking about.
.
I guess you have to ask, "What is the optimal goal here?" Guest comfort, guest mobility in the rooms, or maximizing your bookings revenue. Then, go from there.
As a guest, I want my suitcase easily accessible to me. I think that might be true for most folks. Can you use the hallway space to free up something else in the room? An area for them to store shopping purchases or other stuff like that? Something else that they need sometimes, but not always like extra pillows or blankets? How would you use that room & hall/landing space if you were staying there (based on your history now that you know about your average guest)?
My observation here is that folks draw the drapes, wood blinds, shades, even if no one can see in their rooms and they're just sitting in there during the day when you're in an urban location. So, unless the view is of mountains or ocean or something like that, how important is it??
Funny how you can have an epiphany about how a room could be set up better....last week I just swapped a chair & desk location in one room & it makes the room look a lot bigger & I like where the chair is now in a nice cozy corner. I noticed when I was deep cleaning that you couldn't really see the TV from where the chair previously was anyway. Now, it's in a nice reading nook. Doh!

.
What used to be out there in the hallway was an old pot belly stove with a plant on it (that's back out there) and a hope chest with the 'parts' for making the twin bed into a daybed. I don't do that anymore, too much work swapping daybed for sleeping bed. So, I don't need the hope chest in the hallway.
Most guests don't use the hallway space at all. If I put the new boot trays out there, they wouldn't get used I'm guessing. I think I'm just going to put the upright chair out there, guests can use it to put shoes on if they want and it will free up some room. I still haven't been up there today to see if I like it the new way. (Too damn cold in the inn.)
Ultimate goal? To make the room comfortable and usable. I actually like waking up to an outside view. I can't do that for myself because I need the darkness now to get to sleep. But, when I'm up and just reading in bed, I like looking outside. So, I guess it doesn't matter too much to the guest as no one has ever said they wished they could see out the window and everyone loves that room as it was.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
.
Same versatility...the 2 beds have always been in the room. I think that's what you were referring to.
.
No I was referring to being able to sell it as a 2 room suite with next room. I am assuming that the door you were referring to was a door leading directly to the next room. If I am right, the previous set up you must have had the door blocked?
.
Nope, the door has always operable. Only the beds faced the same direction so if the doors were open you couldn't see the other bed from your bed (in either room).
I have a floor plan on my website that explains in pictures what I'm talking about.
.
I guess you have to ask, "What is the optimal goal here?" Guest comfort, guest mobility in the rooms, or maximizing your bookings revenue. Then, go from there.
As a guest, I want my suitcase easily accessible to me. I think that might be true for most folks. Can you use the hallway space to free up something else in the room? An area for them to store shopping purchases or other stuff like that? Something else that they need sometimes, but not always like extra pillows or blankets? How would you use that room & hall/landing space if you were staying there (based on your history now that you know about your average guest)?
My observation here is that folks draw the drapes, wood blinds, shades, even if no one can see in their rooms and they're just sitting in there during the day when you're in an urban location. So, unless the view is of mountains or ocean or something like that, how important is it??
Funny how you can have an epiphany about how a room could be set up better....last week I just swapped a chair & desk location in one room & it makes the room look a lot bigger & I like where the chair is now in a nice cozy corner. I noticed when I was deep cleaning that you couldn't really see the TV from where the chair previously was anyway. Now, it's in a nice reading nook. Doh!

.
I've been ironing the bedskirts and thinking about my guests. They basically use the rooms to sleep and store their purchases. Even on rainy days they are not here. I've been trying to make the rooms seem 'bigger' because when they DO have all their suitcases ('We're consolidating') and all their purchases ('Do you mind if we leave all the boxes and bags behind?') in the rooms, it's a very tiny space for either them to manoeuvre or for me to work.
It's also a reason I want to get rid of the rocking chairs. Altho they take up little visual space, those damn rockers are a hazard. I'm always catching my toes on them while making beds or vacuuming. And they scrape the radiators and they bang into the walls. Nice, stationary furniture is what I want in the future!
I invited my designer friend over to look at the room. She had some good ideas that I'm going to try to work in.
 

Copperhead

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
5,969
Reaction score
0
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
.
Same versatility...the 2 beds have always been in the room. I think that's what you were referring to.
.
No I was referring to being able to sell it as a 2 room suite with next room. I am assuming that the door you were referring to was a door leading directly to the next room. If I am right, the previous set up you must have had the door blocked?
.
Nope, the door has always operable. Only the beds faced the same direction so if the doors were open you couldn't see the other bed from your bed (in either room).
I have a floor plan on my website that explains in pictures what I'm talking about.
.
I guess you have to ask, "What is the optimal goal here?" Guest comfort, guest mobility in the rooms, or maximizing your bookings revenue. Then, go from there.
As a guest, I want my suitcase easily accessible to me. I think that might be true for most folks. Can you use the hallway space to free up something else in the room? An area for them to store shopping purchases or other stuff like that? Something else that they need sometimes, but not always like extra pillows or blankets? How would you use that room & hall/landing space if you were staying there (based on your history now that you know about your average guest)?
My observation here is that folks draw the drapes, wood blinds, shades, even if no one can see in their rooms and they're just sitting in there during the day when you're in an urban location. So, unless the view is of mountains or ocean or something like that, how important is it??
Funny how you can have an epiphany about how a room could be set up better....last week I just swapped a chair & desk location in one room & it makes the room look a lot bigger & I like where the chair is now in a nice cozy corner. I noticed when I was deep cleaning that you couldn't really see the TV from where the chair previously was anyway. Now, it's in a nice reading nook. Doh!

.
I've been ironing the bedskirts and thinking about my guests. They basically use the rooms to sleep and store their purchases. Even on rainy days they are not here. I've been trying to make the rooms seem 'bigger' because when they DO have all their suitcases ('We're consolidating') and all their purchases ('Do you mind if we leave all the boxes and bags behind?') in the rooms, it's a very tiny space for either them to manoeuvre or for me to work.
It's also a reason I want to get rid of the rocking chairs. Altho they take up little visual space, those damn rockers are a hazard. I'm always catching my toes on them while making beds or vacuuming. And they scrape the radiators and they bang into the walls. Nice, stationary furniture is what I want in the future!
I invited my designer friend over to look at the room. She had some good ideas that I'm going to try to work in.
.
While you are thinking of the guests, you must also consider your mobility around the room. If YOU are having trouble getting around things, so are the guests and once they have all their purchases scattered hither and yon (yes I think we share similar guests & I am not that close to outlets) it makes more of potential hazard environment. The 'bigger' you can make the room (open space) the better.
I also know what you mean about the rocker. I have one in 2 of my rooms. I have been looking at taking them out and replacing as well. Then I have guests that appear to love them. Just yesterday I showed a couple to one of those rooms and the first thing she did was plop down in the rocker with a huge smile on her face saying she just loved the way it rocks.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
.
Same versatility...the 2 beds have always been in the room. I think that's what you were referring to.
.
No I was referring to being able to sell it as a 2 room suite with next room. I am assuming that the door you were referring to was a door leading directly to the next room. If I am right, the previous set up you must have had the door blocked?
.
Nope, the door has always operable. Only the beds faced the same direction so if the doors were open you couldn't see the other bed from your bed (in either room).
I have a floor plan on my website that explains in pictures what I'm talking about.
.
I guess you have to ask, "What is the optimal goal here?" Guest comfort, guest mobility in the rooms, or maximizing your bookings revenue. Then, go from there.
As a guest, I want my suitcase easily accessible to me. I think that might be true for most folks. Can you use the hallway space to free up something else in the room? An area for them to store shopping purchases or other stuff like that? Something else that they need sometimes, but not always like extra pillows or blankets? How would you use that room & hall/landing space if you were staying there (based on your history now that you know about your average guest)?
My observation here is that folks draw the drapes, wood blinds, shades, even if no one can see in their rooms and they're just sitting in there during the day when you're in an urban location. So, unless the view is of mountains or ocean or something like that, how important is it??
Funny how you can have an epiphany about how a room could be set up better....last week I just swapped a chair & desk location in one room & it makes the room look a lot bigger & I like where the chair is now in a nice cozy corner. I noticed when I was deep cleaning that you couldn't really see the TV from where the chair previously was anyway. Now, it's in a nice reading nook. Doh!

.
I've been ironing the bedskirts and thinking about my guests. They basically use the rooms to sleep and store their purchases. Even on rainy days they are not here. I've been trying to make the rooms seem 'bigger' because when they DO have all their suitcases ('We're consolidating') and all their purchases ('Do you mind if we leave all the boxes and bags behind?') in the rooms, it's a very tiny space for either them to manoeuvre or for me to work.
It's also a reason I want to get rid of the rocking chairs. Altho they take up little visual space, those damn rockers are a hazard. I'm always catching my toes on them while making beds or vacuuming. And they scrape the radiators and they bang into the walls. Nice, stationary furniture is what I want in the future!
I invited my designer friend over to look at the room. She had some good ideas that I'm going to try to work in.
.
While you are thinking of the guests, you must also consider your mobility around the room. If YOU are having trouble getting around things, so are the guests and once they have all their purchases scattered hither and yon (yes I think we share similar guests & I am not that close to outlets) it makes more of potential hazard environment. The 'bigger' you can make the room (open space) the better.
I also know what you mean about the rocker. I have one in 2 of my rooms. I have been looking at taking them out and replacing as well. Then I have guests that appear to love them. Just yesterday I showed a couple to one of those rooms and the first thing she did was plop down in the rocker with a huge smile on her face saying she just loved the way it rocks.
.
That is the tough part. Some guests LOVE the rockers, others don't seem to use the furniture for anything but bags and baggage.
 

Samster

Well-known member
Joined
May 30, 2008
Messages
6,475
Reaction score
14
Location
South Carolina
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
.
Same versatility...the 2 beds have always been in the room. I think that's what you were referring to.
.
No I was referring to being able to sell it as a 2 room suite with next room. I am assuming that the door you were referring to was a door leading directly to the next room. If I am right, the previous set up you must have had the door blocked?
.
Nope, the door has always operable. Only the beds faced the same direction so if the doors were open you couldn't see the other bed from your bed (in either room).
I have a floor plan on my website that explains in pictures what I'm talking about.
.
I guess you have to ask, "What is the optimal goal here?" Guest comfort, guest mobility in the rooms, or maximizing your bookings revenue. Then, go from there.
As a guest, I want my suitcase easily accessible to me. I think that might be true for most folks. Can you use the hallway space to free up something else in the room? An area for them to store shopping purchases or other stuff like that? Something else that they need sometimes, but not always like extra pillows or blankets? How would you use that room & hall/landing space if you were staying there (based on your history now that you know about your average guest)?
My observation here is that folks draw the drapes, wood blinds, shades, even if no one can see in their rooms and they're just sitting in there during the day when you're in an urban location. So, unless the view is of mountains or ocean or something like that, how important is it??
Funny how you can have an epiphany about how a room could be set up better....last week I just swapped a chair & desk location in one room & it makes the room look a lot bigger & I like where the chair is now in a nice cozy corner. I noticed when I was deep cleaning that you couldn't really see the TV from where the chair previously was anyway. Now, it's in a nice reading nook. Doh!

.
What used to be out there in the hallway was an old pot belly stove with a plant on it (that's back out there) and a hope chest with the 'parts' for making the twin bed into a daybed. I don't do that anymore, too much work swapping daybed for sleeping bed. So, I don't need the hope chest in the hallway.
Most guests don't use the hallway space at all. If I put the new boot trays out there, they wouldn't get used I'm guessing. I think I'm just going to put the upright chair out there, guests can use it to put shoes on if they want and it will free up some room. I still haven't been up there today to see if I like it the new way. (Too damn cold in the inn.)
Ultimate goal? To make the room comfortable and usable. I actually like waking up to an outside view. I can't do that for myself because I need the darkness now to get to sleep. But, when I'm up and just reading in bed, I like looking outside. So, I guess it doesn't matter too much to the guest as no one has ever said they wished they could see out the window and everyone loves that room as it was.
.
I agree with Copperhead...if you're banging into stuff, then so are the guests. Especially with all their stuff.
Some friends used a large straw hamper as a trash can during the holidays (lined with a plastic bag of course). I noticed that it was fairly narrow but held a lot of trash (disposal plates, cups, etc) & was in a small corner of their hall. Could you use those in your guest rooms as trash cans for all that shopping debris? :)
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,281
Reaction score
146
Go the more versatile route. I know it is more work but with the new arrangement, not only is there more space and view from the queen (main sleeping space) but you now have another option for room use which means more ways to sell.
.
Same versatility...the 2 beds have always been in the room. I think that's what you were referring to.
.
No I was referring to being able to sell it as a 2 room suite with next room. I am assuming that the door you were referring to was a door leading directly to the next room. If I am right, the previous set up you must have had the door blocked?
.
Nope, the door has always operable. Only the beds faced the same direction so if the doors were open you couldn't see the other bed from your bed (in either room).
I have a floor plan on my website that explains in pictures what I'm talking about.
.
I guess you have to ask, "What is the optimal goal here?" Guest comfort, guest mobility in the rooms, or maximizing your bookings revenue. Then, go from there.
As a guest, I want my suitcase easily accessible to me. I think that might be true for most folks. Can you use the hallway space to free up something else in the room? An area for them to store shopping purchases or other stuff like that? Something else that they need sometimes, but not always like extra pillows or blankets? How would you use that room & hall/landing space if you were staying there (based on your history now that you know about your average guest)?
My observation here is that folks draw the drapes, wood blinds, shades, even if no one can see in their rooms and they're just sitting in there during the day when you're in an urban location. So, unless the view is of mountains or ocean or something like that, how important is it??
Funny how you can have an epiphany about how a room could be set up better....last week I just swapped a chair & desk location in one room & it makes the room look a lot bigger & I like where the chair is now in a nice cozy corner. I noticed when I was deep cleaning that you couldn't really see the TV from where the chair previously was anyway. Now, it's in a nice reading nook. Doh!

.
What used to be out there in the hallway was an old pot belly stove with a plant on it (that's back out there) and a hope chest with the 'parts' for making the twin bed into a daybed. I don't do that anymore, too much work swapping daybed for sleeping bed. So, I don't need the hope chest in the hallway.
Most guests don't use the hallway space at all. If I put the new boot trays out there, they wouldn't get used I'm guessing. I think I'm just going to put the upright chair out there, guests can use it to put shoes on if they want and it will free up some room. I still haven't been up there today to see if I like it the new way. (Too damn cold in the inn.)
Ultimate goal? To make the room comfortable and usable. I actually like waking up to an outside view. I can't do that for myself because I need the darkness now to get to sleep. But, when I'm up and just reading in bed, I like looking outside. So, I guess it doesn't matter too much to the guest as no one has ever said they wished they could see out the window and everyone loves that room as it was.
.
I agree with Copperhead...if you're banging into stuff, then so are the guests. Especially with all their stuff.
Some friends used a large straw hamper as a trash can during the holidays (lined with a plastic bag of course). I noticed that it was fairly narrow but held a lot of trash (disposal plates, cups, etc) & was in a small corner of their hall. Could you use those in your guest rooms as trash cans for all that shopping debris? :)
.
The trash really isn't a problem when they are in the rooms, it's when they leave and then it's not their problem! There are days when the cans are overflowing, but not enough to make a change to a bigger trash can. Usually the trash is piled neatly on the floor- newspapers, shoeboxes, shopping bags. Then all the packaging the items came in. Some guests even pack it all nicely into a couple of shopping bags. And then the soda bottles, water bottles, wine bottles! If I could do anything additional it would be to put recycle cans in the rooms.
 
Top