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4arosa

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I wonder if any of you have an indoor shoe-free policy for your guests? We mention such on our website, and reiterate it in our confirmation. We invite people to bring their own slippers or they can borrow a pair from our recently laundered selection. It sure saves on the floor and carpet use, is overall cleaner, and definitely quieter on the slate tiles and wood floors. We are in a 4-season resort and so dirt is nearby year-round.
We get guests who just flatly refuse to wear the slippers, so we let them go barefoot, or wear socks. We wonder if our B&B is in the minority with this no-shoes-indoor policy. What has your feedback been from your guests?
 

MooseTrax

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Ginocat has a shoe-free B&B policy and it seems to work very well for her. But other than the 2 of you I don't think that is very common. Maybe in HI? I notice on all the TV shows everyone is asked to take their shoes off before walking through a house for sale.
 

sandynn

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I respect you choice but I have had foot surgery and I cannot go with out my shoes. I would not ask people to take off their shoes. Sometimes their feet smell bad and have foot oil so I prefer shoes.
Who ever posted a couple of weeks ago with the socks in the closet, that was so gross smelling she could not breath, would agree that socks and feet can smell just awful.
 

happykeeper

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It's all relative. Hawaii, like Japan, is very much a shoes off world. That's just how it's done. Haven't had an issue in 4 years, doubt we ever will.
 

wendydk

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No shoes off policy here....but would it be too much to ask for folks to scrape the mud, sand and such off their shoes before they come in the front door? Have a boot scrubber at the bottom of the porch steps, a scrubby mat and another boot scrubber mat on the front porch.
Last night, the latest guests to get back in tracked a mixture of clay, stones and mud (from god knows where), through the parlor and dining room, all up the stairs, through the upstairs hallway, and all over in their room. I thought the braided rug in there was trashed, but thank god it vac'd up perfectly.
It was perfectly dry last night, so I don't know where it came from....regardless....WTF?
 

Breakfast Diva

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Like Sandynn, I can't go without my special shoes either. I developed plantarfaciitis several years ago from being an innkeeper and being on my feet so many hours of the day. I have to always have my arches supported, and slippers don't do that.
I know of 2 B&Bs in my region who have a no shoe policy, and frankly I don't care for it. I've also heard negatives from guests who have stayed at those inns and then have stayed with us. In Hawaii or Asian countries, it's part of the culture and I'm not offended in the slightest. When I see it here, all I think is "oh, the innkeeper cares more about their carpet/floors than their guests". Sorry, but that's what goes through my mind. I can only believe that a lot of guests feel the same way.
We also live in a rural community and have a lot of sand, mud and dirt, but it's something we just have to deal with.
 

gillumhouse

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DH had polio and had worn a full leg brace ever since. Thre is a brace plate inserted into the arch of his left shoe for the brace calipers to fit into. He cannot walk without his shoes. Personally, if anywhere other than a culture where shoes are not worn indoors, I would be offended to be told to remove my shoes - especially a lodging place. Actually if it is posted on the web site I would move on - BUT I would also expect to be told of this policy when making the reservation, just as I also confirmed (and still do with those 2 rooms) they were aware the bath was shared.
With the way shoes are made today with molded soles, DH has not been able to buy a new pair of shoes in years. He takes VERY good care of his shoes for that reason. Custom made shoes are horrifically expensive. When he was going through his "Western phase" in the 1980s a pair of Tony Lama boots cost me $300 per pair custom made - one foot is a size smaller than the other and he needed a zipper in the side of the left boot - and he has not worn them for years. I think he had 4 pairs of them.
 

JBloggs

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Gee thanks you just brought back the bile in memory of the man's socks I found in a closet two weeks ago. There may be a REASON people do not wish to remove their shoes.
Unless it is cultural many not accustomed to that will not follow suite. Albeit many Asians in BC, but those from out of the area will not necessarily want to remove their shoes. We lived in Pac NW and always removed our shoes, our friends from AK do the same, even here. It is customary for many people. We have been in Hawaii many times and always removed them there, even at a small church we attended - inside = outside shoes off.
We have red clay soil hereso we might as well have red carpet and red wood floors. It is the price of allowing the public into your place. With 9 rooms it would be harder to enforce than a smaller BnB. I am sure you have a sign at the door and all that. So no suggestion other than get most to do it and be glad those guests did.
Welcome to the forum! You have a lovely place in a beautiful setting.
 

EmptyNest

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I think sometimes it is the location that sort of designates the shoe free policy..ie: Hawaii like someone mentioned...just the way it is. Many guests we had wanted to take their shoes off the minute they walked in because they said they had been trained by their mother to do that. We didn't really care. We can always clean the rug or wash the floors. It was not important to us.
If it is important to you, that is fine, but be aware..not everyone will take kindly to it and you may have to deal with it.
 

ginocat

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I think sometimes it is the location that sort of designates the shoe free policy..ie: Hawaii like someone mentioned...just the way it is. Many guests we had wanted to take their shoes off the minute they walked in because they said they had been trained by their mother to do that. We didn't really care. We can always clean the rug or wash the floors. It was not important to us.
If it is important to you, that is fine, but be aware..not everyone will take kindly to it and you may have to deal with it..
It is not uncommon in Canada to have a 'no outside shoe' policy. Of course if someone needs to wear orthopedic shoes I don't enforce it. I've not had a problem with the rule in 18 years. Some people look at me strangely (American or UK usually) but they comply. The majority of people tell me that they don't wear outside shoes in their homes either.
 

seashanty

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welcome 4arosa ~

in light of what people here have posted about having to wear 'special' shoes, what will you do if someone checks in ~ maybe the spouse or more likely a friend of whoever makes the reservation who wasn't thinking this would be an issue for them, despite your reminder on the website and in the confirmation ~ and says 'i must wear my shoes' .... will you make an exception?
 

JBloggs

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I think sometimes it is the location that sort of designates the shoe free policy..ie: Hawaii like someone mentioned...just the way it is. Many guests we had wanted to take their shoes off the minute they walked in because they said they had been trained by their mother to do that. We didn't really care. We can always clean the rug or wash the floors. It was not important to us.
If it is important to you, that is fine, but be aware..not everyone will take kindly to it and you may have to deal with it..
It is not uncommon in Canada to have a 'no outside shoe' policy. Of course if someone needs to wear orthopedic shoes I don't enforce it. I've not had a problem with the rule in 18 years. Some people look at me strangely (American or UK usually) but they comply. The majority of people tell me that they don't wear outside shoes in their homes either.
.
ginocat said:
It is not uncommon in Canada to have a 'no outside shoe' policy. Of course if someone needs to wear orthopedic shoes I don't enforce it. I've not had a problem with the rule in 18 years. Some people look at me strangely (American or UK usually) but they comply. The majority of people tell me that they don't wear outside shoes in their homes either.
I think there should be a rule for those guests specifically from the UK:
No Short Pants Allowed
(Otherwise issue sunglasses to prevent snow blindness
)
 

Breakfast Diva

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I think sometimes it is the location that sort of designates the shoe free policy..ie: Hawaii like someone mentioned...just the way it is. Many guests we had wanted to take their shoes off the minute they walked in because they said they had been trained by their mother to do that. We didn't really care. We can always clean the rug or wash the floors. It was not important to us.
If it is important to you, that is fine, but be aware..not everyone will take kindly to it and you may have to deal with it..
It is not uncommon in Canada to have a 'no outside shoe' policy. Of course if someone needs to wear orthopedic shoes I don't enforce it. I've not had a problem with the rule in 18 years. Some people look at me strangely (American or UK usually) but they comply. The majority of people tell me that they don't wear outside shoes in their homes either.
.
ginocat said:
It is not uncommon in Canada to have a 'no outside shoe' policy. Of course if someone needs to wear orthopedic shoes I don't enforce it. I've not had a problem with the rule in 18 years. Some people look at me strangely (American or UK usually) but they comply. The majority of people tell me that they don't wear outside shoes in their homes either.
I think there should be a rule for those guests specifically from the UK:
No Short Pants Allowed
(Otherwise issue sunglasses to prevent snow blindness
)
.
Joe Bloggs said:
ginocat said:
It is not uncommon in Canada to have a 'no outside shoe' policy. Of course if someone needs to wear orthopedic shoes I don't enforce it. I've not had a problem with the rule in 18 years. Some people look at me strangely (American or UK usually) but they comply. The majority of people tell me that they don't wear outside shoes in their homes either.
I think there should be a rule for those guests specifically from the UK:
No Short Pants Allowed
(Otherwise issue sunglasses to prevent snow blindness
)
That's very funny Joe!! We've got a couple of Brits here now who are in shorts and you can't tell them apart from the rest of us Pacific Northwest folks who glow in the dark! They blend right in.
 

JBloggs

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I think sometimes it is the location that sort of designates the shoe free policy..ie: Hawaii like someone mentioned...just the way it is. Many guests we had wanted to take their shoes off the minute they walked in because they said they had been trained by their mother to do that. We didn't really care. We can always clean the rug or wash the floors. It was not important to us.
If it is important to you, that is fine, but be aware..not everyone will take kindly to it and you may have to deal with it..
It is not uncommon in Canada to have a 'no outside shoe' policy. Of course if someone needs to wear orthopedic shoes I don't enforce it. I've not had a problem with the rule in 18 years. Some people look at me strangely (American or UK usually) but they comply. The majority of people tell me that they don't wear outside shoes in their homes either.
.
ginocat said:
It is not uncommon in Canada to have a 'no outside shoe' policy. Of course if someone needs to wear orthopedic shoes I don't enforce it. I've not had a problem with the rule in 18 years. Some people look at me strangely (American or UK usually) but they comply. The majority of people tell me that they don't wear outside shoes in their homes either.
I think there should be a rule for those guests specifically from the UK:
No Short Pants Allowed
(Otherwise issue sunglasses to prevent snow blindness
)
.
Joe Bloggs said:
ginocat said:
It is not uncommon in Canada to have a 'no outside shoe' policy. Of course if someone needs to wear orthopedic shoes I don't enforce it. I've not had a problem with the rule in 18 years. Some people look at me strangely (American or UK usually) but they comply. The majority of people tell me that they don't wear outside shoes in their homes either.
I think there should be a rule for those guests specifically from the UK:
No Short Pants Allowed
(Otherwise issue sunglasses to prevent snow blindness
)
That's very funny Joe!! We've got a couple of Brits here now who are in shorts and you can't tell them apart from the rest of us Pacific Northwest folks who glow in the dark! They blend right in.
.
Breakfast Diva said:
Joe Bloggs said:
ginocat said:
It is not uncommon in Canada to have a 'no outside shoe' policy. Of course if someone needs to wear orthopedic shoes I don't enforce it. I've not had a problem with the rule in 18 years. Some people look at me strangely (American or UK usually) but they comply. The majority of people tell me that they don't wear outside shoes in their homes either.
I think there should be a rule for those guests specifically from the UK:
No Short Pants Allowed
(Otherwise issue sunglasses to prevent snow blindness
)
That's very funny Joe!! We've got a couple of Brits here now who are in shorts and you can't tell them apart from the rest of us Pacific Northwest folks who glow in the dark! They blend right in.
uhhhh didn't want to mention that either. ha ha Blue is the new tan. :)
 

inn_keeper

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YES, shoe free policy here too. I supply slippers (with my logo and name printed on them) as a take home gift for our guests. When guests arrive I have a new pair waiting with their name on them (little sticker that comes off when they leave) so no one wears anyone else's. I’ve had very few issues over the past 13 years.
On my confirmation letter I state the following:
[COLOR= #000000]‘[/COLOR]It is a Canadian Custom to remove our outside shoes while in our homes. At XXXX B & B we are proud to follow this custom. To make it more comfortable and convenient to our US guests who are not used to this custom, we provide clean spa slippers for indoor use to all our guests (Yours to take home!). If you are in anyway insulted by this custom, we ask you to please contact us before your arrival date. Thank you!’
We do not have this policy because we care more for our wood floors than the guests, it’s because it part of our Canadian culture. A culture I am very proud of. It is out of respect for one another that we remove our shoes when visiting someone home/house. My B&B is in my home and I feel that's why some guests choose a B&B over a hotel, they want the homey atmosphere.
Now, if someone were to inform us ahead of time that they could not wear slippers due to some personal problem, I would suggest they bring there own inside shoes.
Most guests love the slippers and when they return they look forward to getting their new pair. Even had a guests from CA email and ask us if they could buy 4 more pairs as they wanted to start this custom in their own house. I sent them 5 paris, no charge - FREE advertising for me!!
Just finished a 6 month world tour myself. Many counties we visited had a shoes off policy. I think this custom is more prevalent then some people realize.
 

JBloggs

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YES, shoe free policy here too. I supply slippers (with my logo and name printed on them) as a take home gift for our guests. When guests arrive I have a new pair waiting with their name on them (little sticker that comes off when they leave) so no one wears anyone else's. I’ve had very few issues over the past 13 years.
On my confirmation letter I state the following:
[COLOR= #000000]‘[/COLOR]It is a Canadian Custom to remove our outside shoes while in our homes. At XXXX B & B we are proud to follow this custom. To make it more comfortable and convenient to our US guests who are not used to this custom, we provide clean spa slippers for indoor use to all our guests (Yours to take home!). If you are in anyway insulted by this custom, we ask you to please contact us before your arrival date. Thank you!’
We do not have this policy because we care more for our wood floors than the guests, it’s because it part of our Canadian culture. A culture I am very proud of. It is out of respect for one another that we remove our shoes when visiting someone home/house. My B&B is in my home and I feel that's why some guests choose a B&B over a hotel, they want the homey atmosphere.
Now, if someone were to inform us ahead of time that they could not wear slippers due to some personal problem, I would suggest they bring there own inside shoes.
Most guests love the slippers and when they return they look forward to getting their new pair. Even had a guests from CA email and ask us if they could buy 4 more pairs as they wanted to start this custom in their own house. I sent them 5 paris, no charge - FREE advertising for me!!
Just finished a 6 month world tour myself. Many counties we visited had a shoes off policy. I think this custom is more prevalent then some people realize..
inn_keeper said:
Just finished a 6 month world tour myself. Many counties we visited had a shoes off policy. I think this custom is more prevalent then some people realize.
6 month world tour?Wow. Yes world indeed, but Americans typically do not remove shoes - unless it is beach house or something. That is the culture here, perhaps it may seem a little too - what is the word - comfortable, maybe? Thanks for sharing.
 

Sanctuary

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We are "no shoes" which is no uncommon on a yacht. It's the only way I can keep white carpet white. The carpet has been down for 3 years now and no stains or dirt paths. My goal is to install teak & holly floors and get rid of the carpet entirely. But that's a project for another day...
 

Proud Texan

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We live in very sandy soil with a red clay mix. We have a series of sisal door mats that guest walk over before getting to the door and another mat inside the door, so most outside dirt gets stopped before getting in the house. Most of our guests are very considerate and if it has been raining, will remove their shoes at the door without being asked.
 

Somewhere in Paradise

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We just have a little sign outside of the door that says "Hawaiian tradition, please remove your shoes, Mahalo" and a little blurb in the welcome letter about it traditional, cleaner and relaxing - you know leaving your outside shoes outside sometimes feels like you are leaving your troubles out with them. If the guest does not do it that is up to them. I think it would make everyone feel uncomfortable.
I do prefer it when they do - it makes the cleaning soooo much easier.
 

Penelope

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We just have a little sign outside of the door that says "Hawaiian tradition, please remove your shoes, Mahalo" and a little blurb in the welcome letter about it traditional, cleaner and relaxing - you know leaving your outside shoes outside sometimes feels like you are leaving your troubles out with them. If the guest does not do it that is up to them. I think it would make everyone feel uncomfortable.
I do prefer it when they do - it makes the cleaning soooo much easier..
I think your explanation of leaving outside shoes at the door makes a lot of sense. Thanks for giving me that word picture.
 
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