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birdwatcher

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Sometimes this is the worst part of this job..no I think IT IS THE WORST PART OF THE JOB.
Im sure its been a thread before..but just had to vent. I am so tired tonight, but its my turn for the lategettinghere guests and it just peeves me. Why cant they call? I mean how hard is it to just call from your cell phone and just let us know how late you will be? Its now almost 10pm we knew that one guest would be late, buy the other one has not called or anything. The first guest should have arrived around 8:30-9PM...so I will be up for a while and I bet that breakfast will be early....
Thanks for letting me vent.
 

Arks

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My sympathy. I don't see myself ever doing this. If they arrived this late they'd find a welcome note on the door explaining the self-checkin process, and that I'd see them in the morning.
In fact, we stayed at a B&B in Arizona last year where I didn't meet the owner until the 3rd day we were there! When we arrived about 6 p.m. there was a note on the door saying she'd gone to the movie and explaining which room was ours.
The next morning I left early for sightseeing and returned after dark. At her place, all the guest rooms opened to a common outdoor courtyard so I didn't have to go through her place to get to my room. So we didn't cross paths until breakfast of my third day there!
Granted, that's not a usual B&B experience, but I didn't mind a bit.
 

Morticia

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Time to work on a policy for late arrivals...rig something up that works for everyone. I seriously believe now that most guests do NOT want to put you out by having you wait up.
 

Don Draper

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We do the note system after 6 pm, which is clearly outlined in their confirmation. We also ask for a cell phone and if it gets to be 6 and we haven't heard anything we call the cell to see if they can give us and ETA, make sure they have directions, etc.
Fortunately we seem to be getting a lot of self-sufficient guests this year. Have not had any issues. If I wait past 6 I'm far too cranky to be nice to someone, especially if they couldn't even call to let me know they'd be late. I can be fake cheery in the note at least
 

JBloggs

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It is a part of travel and the thing is guests don't want you to be sitting around waiting for them, that adds undue stress on their trip as well. As mentioned on other threads, it is time we stop baby sitting guests. I know some innkeepers take offense at that and believe it is "customer service" they are offering, but in reality, people don't care about the innkeepers, they are tired and just went to get into their room, shower, eat, cool off and relax from the road.
Now the next day - this is when you can bring the smiles to their day, feed them, burp them and send them off for a day of fun!
 

JBloggs

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And another thing for those who think can't can't work out a key pad on the door or something, then you need to revoke their license and take their keys, if they are that out of touch with reality that they can't work out how to open a door and go to their room. I think we give people too little credit. Sure some need hand holding, but if there is no hand, there is no holding.
 

Morticia

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And another thing for those who think can't can't work out a key pad on the door or something, then you need to revoke their license and take their keys, if they are that out of touch with reality that they can't work out how to open a door and go to their room. I think we give people too little credit. Sure some need hand holding, but if there is no hand, there is no holding..
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
 

wendydk

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It is a part of travel and the thing is guests don't want you to be sitting around waiting for them, that adds undue stress on their trip as well. As mentioned on other threads, it is time we stop baby sitting guests. I know some innkeepers take offense at that and believe it is "customer service" they are offering, but in reality, people don't care about the innkeepers, they are tired and just went to get into their room, shower, eat, cool off and relax from the road.
Now the next day - this is when you can bring the smiles to their day, feed them, burp them and send them off for a day of fun!.
Joey Bloggs said:
As mentioned on other threads, it is time we stop baby sitting guests. I know some innkeepers take offense at that and believe it is "customer service" they are offering.....
JB is totally right, and it took me seven years to figure that out. Lots of pressure on me for nothing; and I firmly believe that not figuring it out is the kind of thing that burns innkeepers out in an average of seven years. This is my funnest summer yet. And, my mom comes up from Florida for three weeks starting this week. Once again renting the cottage on the lake in my hometown, and you can bet I will be sneaking off at every opportunity while she's there!
 

Don Draper

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And another thing for those who think can't can't work out a key pad on the door or something, then you need to revoke their license and take their keys, if they are that out of touch with reality that they can't work out how to open a door and go to their room. I think we give people too little credit. Sure some need hand holding, but if there is no hand, there is no holding..
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
.
Morticia said:
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
I couldn't agree more. And what we see, at least for our locale, is that the people who are really into the b&b "experience" (as opposed to the area/location, etc.) are the ones who are always here as soon as check-in starts anyway. They want the full experience and so plan their day around getting here as soon as we'll let 'em in!
 

Copperhead

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And another thing for those who think can't can't work out a key pad on the door or something, then you need to revoke their license and take their keys, if they are that out of touch with reality that they can't work out how to open a door and go to their room. I think we give people too little credit. Sure some need hand holding, but if there is no hand, there is no holding..
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
.
I so totally agree Mort and I have begun doing just that. It is time to take my life back!!! It is so easy to provide these details in their confirmation or in a welcome letter left at the entrance.
Most important thing is having that cell number to make contact if they had provided their ETA but have not shown. What's the harm of calling them and providing them with the entry code and that the rest of the details & key would be in an envelope inside the door. That takes the stress out from all conserned.
 

Breakfast Diva

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And another thing for those who think can't can't work out a key pad on the door or something, then you need to revoke their license and take their keys, if they are that out of touch with reality that they can't work out how to open a door and go to their room. I think we give people too little credit. Sure some need hand holding, but if there is no hand, there is no holding..
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
.
Morticia said:
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
I couldn't agree more. And what we see, at least for our locale, is that the people who are really into the b&b "experience" (as opposed to the area/location, etc.) are the ones who are always here as soon as check-in starts anyway. They want the full experience and so plan their day around getting here as soon as we'll let 'em in!
.
I basically agree with the self-check-in, but I've had the opposite experience with the traditional B&B guests. They have been the ones that expect to be greeted personally and want more interaction, especially at check-in. We had a VERY negative experience where a guest was left a very explicit note at the door, a phone number to call, etc. They let themselves in, went to their room, used the bathroom, then left. They left a note saying they felt "lost and abandoned", in all their years staying at b&bs had never not been greeted personally and they were not staying (3 night stay). He later demanded his deposit back and refused to pay for his early departure. It was a very bad experience for us. We did finally convince him we were keeping his deposit, but wouldn't charge for the remainder of his stay.
 

Samster

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It is a part of travel and the thing is guests don't want you to be sitting around waiting for them, that adds undue stress on their trip as well. As mentioned on other threads, it is time we stop baby sitting guests. I know some innkeepers take offense at that and believe it is "customer service" they are offering, but in reality, people don't care about the innkeepers, they are tired and just went to get into their room, shower, eat, cool off and relax from the road.
Now the next day - this is when you can bring the smiles to their day, feed them, burp them and send them off for a day of fun!.
I agree....mostly about trusting guests to take care of themselves. But we've had several guests who have arrived very late after traveling from the large metro airport 90 minutes away, a couple of them without luggage. Greeting them and assuring them that we'll take care of them until their luggage arrives has been a relief to them. Had one repeat guest who got here at 1 AM after sitting on the Interstate in an airport shuttle van for hours. She threw her arms around me and said, "I KNEW that you'd be here and everything would be OK!" :) You have to go with what works for you.....
Now, from the guest perspective..... If you really DON'T want to be bothered during your dinner hour, put out a key and instructions for me on how to get to my room. I'm a big girl. But if I've called and apologized that I'm going to be slightly late because I had to have a tire looked at, in a strange city, don't keep saying during the tour that your dinner has been interrupted and you're doing me a favor by greeting me personally. Gee, thanks.
That's the key....greet the guests because you want to, not because you're a control freak and have to tell them where the recycle bins are. True story....
 

JBloggs

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BD that guest would have been bad news all the way any, for someone to say that I would think PITA would be a fitting term for the duration of the stay.
I want to say this, people are booking a room at your inn, they are not, booking you. I know an innkeeper who feels SHE IS THE INN, and if she is tired or under the weather and can't do the entire song and dance then she has failed. This is wrong, they don't know you before they stay with you. You promote the inn, not you, we are not hired entertainment, personal assistants or worse yet slaves.
We cannot be all things to all men. We cannot be on 24 hours a day we are human. God forbid we have a health or family emergency. Then what? What is more important then? Is that what it takes for some of us to stop giving more than we should? (I say this to myself as well as the forum).
A note for a late arrival is not okay? We have stipulated check in times, if you are not here, then you get a note, it is not rocket science, it is a nice easy way to allow access for the guests. Innkeepers here give 110%, and then leave nothing for THEMSELVES. You can't provide the best for the guests if you are running low...
 

JBloggs

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Ahhh the old recycle bins check in...not good...not good at all. That s/b an innkeeping mantra right there! In other words, the world will come to an end if we don't show the guests the recycle bins. Lighten up, comes to mind. :)
 

Copperhead

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And another thing for those who think can't can't work out a key pad on the door or something, then you need to revoke their license and take their keys, if they are that out of touch with reality that they can't work out how to open a door and go to their room. I think we give people too little credit. Sure some need hand holding, but if there is no hand, there is no holding..
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
.
Morticia said:
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
I couldn't agree more. And what we see, at least for our locale, is that the people who are really into the b&b "experience" (as opposed to the area/location, etc.) are the ones who are always here as soon as check-in starts anyway. They want the full experience and so plan their day around getting here as soon as we'll let 'em in!
.
I basically agree with the self-check-in, but I've had the opposite experience with the traditional B&B guests. They have been the ones that expect to be greeted personally and want more interaction, especially at check-in. We had a VERY negative experience where a guest was left a very explicit note at the door, a phone number to call, etc. They let themselves in, went to their room, used the bathroom, then left. They left a note saying they felt "lost and abandoned", in all their years staying at b&bs had never not been greeted personally and they were not staying (3 night stay). He later demanded his deposit back and refused to pay for his early departure. It was a very bad experience for us. We did finally convince him we were keeping his deposit, but wouldn't charge for the remainder of his stay.
.
BD, sorry you had such a negative experience and I am glad you brought this up. Let us all learn from this bad experience! So a few of questions:
Were these guests late arrivals?
If so, had they told you in advance or were they just arriving in their due time?
Had you told them in advance that it would be a self check-in? Or after a certain time that it would be?
Have you changed your polices since this?
 

Samster

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Ahhh the old recycle bins check in...not good...not good at all. That s/b an innkeeping mantra right there! In other words, the world will come to an end if we don't show the guests the recycle bins. Lighten up, comes to mind. :).
And did I mention that you would have to be blind without a seeing eye dog to miss those recycle bins? All of that after I had apologized AGAIN for having to stop to have tire checked out and had to wait for service, of course, and drove over 4 hours mostly in a torrential rain.
The key is to be tuned into the guest! There are innkeepers here on this forum that EXCEL at that. My hat's off to y'all!!
 

Don Draper

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And another thing for those who think can't can't work out a key pad on the door or something, then you need to revoke their license and take their keys, if they are that out of touch with reality that they can't work out how to open a door and go to their room. I think we give people too little credit. Sure some need hand holding, but if there is no hand, there is no holding..
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
.
Morticia said:
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
I couldn't agree more. And what we see, at least for our locale, is that the people who are really into the b&b "experience" (as opposed to the area/location, etc.) are the ones who are always here as soon as check-in starts anyway. They want the full experience and so plan their day around getting here as soon as we'll let 'em in!
.
I basically agree with the self-check-in, but I've had the opposite experience with the traditional B&B guests. They have been the ones that expect to be greeted personally and want more interaction, especially at check-in. We had a VERY negative experience where a guest was left a very explicit note at the door, a phone number to call, etc. They let themselves in, went to their room, used the bathroom, then left. They left a note saying they felt "lost and abandoned", in all their years staying at b&bs had never not been greeted personally and they were not staying (3 night stay). He later demanded his deposit back and refused to pay for his early departure. It was a very bad experience for us. We did finally convince him we were keeping his deposit, but wouldn't charge for the remainder of his stay.
.
Yuck. Had they told you they would be late? If so, then I guess I could see "expecting" a welcome...but not past 8 pm (who exactly do they think prepares those wonderful breakfasts they eat, the Keebler Elves? We need sleep people, and we get up EARLY).
It sounds to me like they were hyper-demanding and likely would have been for the entire 3 days. The review stinks, but honestly as a potential guest if I read that I would immediately think the writer was bizarre.
 

Copperhead

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BD that guest would have been bad news all the way any, for someone to say that I would think PITA would be a fitting term for the duration of the stay.
I want to say this, people are booking a room at your inn, they are not, booking you. I know an innkeeper who feels SHE IS THE INN, and if she is tired or under the weather and can't do the entire song and dance then she has failed. This is wrong, they don't know you before they stay with you. You promote the inn, not you, we are not hired entertainment, personal assistants or worse yet slaves.
We cannot be all things to all men. We cannot be on 24 hours a day we are human. God forbid we have a health or family emergency. Then what? What is more important then? Is that what it takes for some of us to stop giving more than we should? (I say this to myself as well as the forum).
A note for a late arrival is not okay? We have stipulated check in times, if you are not here, then you get a note, it is not rocket science, it is a nice easy way to allow access for the guests. Innkeepers here give 110%, and then leave nothing for THEMSELVES. You can't provide the best for the guests if you are running low....
Joey Bloggs said:
BD that guest would have been bad news all the way any, for someone to say that I would think PITA would be a fitting term for the duration of the stay.
I want to say this, people are booking a room at your inn, they are not, booking you. I know an innkeeper who feels SHE IS THE INN, and if she is tired or under the weather and can't do the entire song and dance then she has failed. This is wrong, they don't know you before they stay with you. You promote the inn, not you, we are not hired entertainment, personal assistants or worse yet slaves.
We cannot be all things to all men. We cannot be on 24 hours a day we are human. God forbid we have a health or family emergency. Then what? What is more important then? Is that what it takes for some of us to stop giving more than we should? (I say this to myself as well as the forum).
A note for a late arrival is not okay? We have stipulated check in times, if you are not here, then you get a note, it is not rocket science, it is a nice easy way to allow access for the guests. Innkeepers here give 110%, and then leave nothing for THEMSELVES. You can't provide the best for the guests if you are running low...
JB - I respectfully disagree. While I do think they are booking a room, not booking us, our reviews state otherwise. There are very few reviews of our B&B that do not mention us in some form or fashion and while OUR website does not promote our place that way - the reviews do. So who's to say that it is not the innkeeper's reputation that is not producing the booking in these cases? And the first time that we had a relief innkeeper here, we did receive several notes providing rave reviews to the relief innkeeper but stating that they were disapointed in not meeting us... I had never thought of it to be that big of deal, but from then on, if WE were not going to be here, I provided that info to the guest at booking.
Edited to add - This is said as I know that we ALL go out of our way in some form or fashion for our guests and I am sure that we ALL have been given a 'that-a-boy' in review. We ARE part of the B&B experience and at least partially the reason people book.
 

Morticia

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And another thing for those who think can't can't work out a key pad on the door or something, then you need to revoke their license and take their keys, if they are that out of touch with reality that they can't work out how to open a door and go to their room. I think we give people too little credit. Sure some need hand holding, but if there is no hand, there is no holding..
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
.
Morticia said:
I do have to say that, of the guests who have mentioned it, the idea of letting themselves in and not bothering us was very well-received. This is on the phone when they make the rez, day of when they find themselves stranded in an airport or find they really need to stop and eat before they get here, have a family event that takes precedence, or those who just don't 'get' the idea of a B&B being a small property without front desk services, etc.
Really, all that is needed is a system that works for the property in question. And we've listed off a lot of them that work in a variety of locations.
But, we know some innkeepers who must control every movement their guests make for whom this just does not work. But that's a whole 'nother story.
I couldn't agree more. And what we see, at least for our locale, is that the people who are really into the b&b "experience" (as opposed to the area/location, etc.) are the ones who are always here as soon as check-in starts anyway. They want the full experience and so plan their day around getting here as soon as we'll let 'em in!
.
I basically agree with the self-check-in, but I've had the opposite experience with the traditional B&B guests. They have been the ones that expect to be greeted personally and want more interaction, especially at check-in. We had a VERY negative experience where a guest was left a very explicit note at the door, a phone number to call, etc. They let themselves in, went to their room, used the bathroom, then left. They left a note saying they felt "lost and abandoned", in all their years staying at b&bs had never not been greeted personally and they were not staying (3 night stay). He later demanded his deposit back and refused to pay for his early departure. It was a very bad experience for us. We did finally convince him we were keeping his deposit, but wouldn't charge for the remainder of his stay.
.
That was a PITA putting the blame on you for not being his personal slave and entertainment. Maybe if he wanted to be personally greeted everywhere he went he should plan better or at least get in contact prior to arrival to understand what would be waiting for him.
 
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